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Reporters Without Borders and VERA Files present Media Ownership Monitor the Philippines: Duopoly in the Philippine media

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first_img These are some of the main findings of the Media Ownership Monitor (MOM), a research and advocacy project carried out in the Philippines by VERA Files and Reporters Without Borders (RSF) over the past three months and presented in Manila today. The detailed results of the three-month study are now available to the public on the MOM website at http://philippines.mom-rsf.org in English, and soon in Tagalog.“Even though there might be little political control being openly exerted over Philippine media right now, the subtle yet strong ties between business interests and political power plays, found in almost all media companies, limit the media’s independency”, said Christian Mihr, executive director of RSF Germany. “The current legal framework does neither effectively promote transparency in the market nor takes into account conflict of interests hidden in the media’s ownership structure. The Media Ownership Monitor aims to be a starting point for a discussion on more effective, independent media-specific regulation. The Philippine media business community on all levels should work on better mechanisms for media ownership and transparency.” VERA Files President Ellen T. Tordesillas added: “The power of media lies in its role as a vehicle of information to the public. An informed public is an empowered citizenry. It is, therefore, important to let the public know who is behind their sources of media, and what kind of political and businesses affiliations the owners have. Thus they can better evaluate the quality and credibility of news being dished out by the media outlets.”High market concentration across media sectors The two media networks dominating the market economically are ABS-CBN Corporation and GMA Network Inc. They together gather a market share of 79.44%, considering the revenue of the 29 biggest media companies. Even if advertising budgets were not available for all media companies, the trend shows that especially the two big media networks benefit from selling advertising space, with TV getting the lion’s share.Both ABS-CBN Corp. and GMA Network Inc. operate across media sectors and offer the most watched, most listened to and most clicked content. Together, they reach 80.72% of the audience through their TV channels ABS-CBN2 / ABS-CBN Sports and Action and GMA/GNTV, as well as 47.2% of the FM radio listenership via DZMM 630 (ABS-CBN Corp.) and DZBB 594 (GMA Network, Inc.). Considering that TV and radio are the type of media mostly used, and TV by far the most trusted source of political information in the Philippines, they likely have an impact on public opinion. Both media networks also offer popular online news websites, which are gaining in relevance and strengthen their cross-media presence. The print market is more evenly distributed among players due to a diversity of tabloid and broadsheet titles, with the entertainment-focused tabloid newspapers being read more compared to broadsheets.Media ownership is an enclave of politico-economic elite Five families in the Forbes List of 2016 Philippines’ 50 Richest are in the media industry, four of which made their money predominantly from media. The Lopez family tops the list of media billionaires: Oscar M. Lopez is the second son of Lopez Group founder and ABS-CBN Corporation’s Eugenio H. Lopez. Eugenio “Geny” Lopez Sr. was the son of former Iloilo governor Benito Lopez and the elder brother of former Vice President Fernando Lopez. Regina Paz “Gina” Lopez does not hold a management position in the media company but is the current Department of Environment and Natural Resources Secretary, a cabinet position to which she was appointed by President Rodrigo Duterte.The triumvirate of former congressman Gilberto Duavit, Menardo Jimenez and Felipe Gozon controls the media group GMA Network. Duavit’s son Gilberto Jr. runs the network operations, while Duavit’s younger son Michael left his the board to focus on a political career. Duavit’s brother in-law, Menardo Jimenez, former GMA Network’s president, still holds considerable shares while serving as consultant at investment bank First Metro Investment. Advertising dollars from political ads during the 2016 presidential elections helped bring in a reported 150% increase in profits for the network in quarter one. The Yap family, who build their wealth in banking, owns Manila Bulletin Publishing, which is responsible for the most popular broadsheet Manila Bulletin as well as the tabloids Balita and Tempo. Even though the political and economic elite are interweaved, those links have not led to targeted discriminatory actions in the recent past, with in general little political control being openly exerted. It poses, however, a potential risk to media as soon as the political elite start to exploit the vulnerability of media owners.Transparency only on the surface Companies registered in the Philippines have to disclose their ownership structures to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), where information needs to be purchased. This does not prevent the practice of layering company structures to obscure ultimate beneficial owners to the public. While those complex structures are legal and theoretically can be delayered, this requires immense investigative research for each media company.“In the course of our research, we realized that even as media demands transparency from the government and other sources, the industry is not as transparent as it should be,” said VERA Files President, Ellen T. Tordesillas. The ultimate motives for establishing and frequently changing the corporate structures are questionable. One motive could be disguising foreign ownership, as it seems to be true for example for Manuel V. Pangilinan’s cross-media and telecommunication empire, which can be traced back to an Indonesian investor.Legal framework Media-specific legal safeguards that prevent media ownership concentration do not exist. A new anti-trust body has been established by the Fair Competition Act in 2014 – the Philippine Competition Commission (PCC) – which still has to show that it also monitors, and prevents or otherwise breakups media monopolies.The role of religious mediaThe involvement of religious organizations, such as the Catholic Church (Radyo Veritas) and Philippine-based Iglesia ni Cristo (INC TV), in the media market is unique for the Philippines. Officially, the Philippines is a secular nation, with the constitution guaranteeing separation of church and state. However, the Iglesias ni Cristo, led by Eduardo V. Manalo, practice bloc voting and their representatives endorsed appointees to key government positions.***The Media Ownership Monitor Philippines was carried out by Reporters Without Borders in partnership with VERA Files between August and November 2016. The project studied the legal environment, media concentration and ownership structures of the country’s 46 most popular national media outlets. VERA Files is a non-profit media organization composed of veteran journalists, committed to advance excellence in journalism by engaging in research-intensive, high-impact reports in multiple formats and providing training, particularly mentoring of journalists.MOM is an international project launched by the international press freedom watchdog Reporters Without Borders. It is or is being carried out in eight countries worldwide, including Turkey, Tunisia, Colombia and Cambodia. It applies a generic methodology for all countries as it looks at ownership and media concentration of the most relevant audio-visual, print and online outlets, which are selected based on audience share. The Project is funded by the German Ministry for Economic Development and Cooperation (BMZ). News Mass international solidarity campaign launched in support of Maria Ressa PhilippinesAsia – Pacific Reports and statisticsMedia independence Conflicts of interest November 17, 2016 – Updated on August 23, 2019 Reporters Without Borders and VERA Files present Media Ownership Monitor the Philippines: Duopoly in the Philippine media News Filipina journalist still held although court dismissed case eleven days ago to go further Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts Organisation News PhilippinesAsia – Pacific Reports and statisticsMedia independence Conflicts of interest June 1, 2021 Find out more Philippines: RSF and the #HoldTheLine Coalition welcome reprieve for Maria Ressa, demand all other charges and cases be dropped Despite a high number of media outlets and being described as one of the most freewheeling media systems in the region, Philippine media continue to be owned by and to depend on the economic and political elite. Two giant broadcast networks dominate the Philippine media industry both in terms of economic market power and audience reach, which gives them a major potential to shape public opinion. Ownership structures are legal on the surface but the practice of corporate layering leads to legal contraventions related to foreign ownership and taxation. News May 3, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Philippines RSF_en February 16, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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The changing role of the HR institute

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first_img Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. The changing role of the HR instituteOn 4 Mar 2003 in Personnel Today Duncan Brown and Ralph Tribe discuss the value that the Chartered Instituteof Personnel and Development provides to the professionDuncan Brown, assistant director-general of the CIPDIn 31 Songs, Nick Hornby says it is far easier to write about thingsyou don’t like than those you do. Maybe this is what motivates the occasionalcritics of the CIPD who appear in the pages of Personnel Today. The CIPD is not perfect – far from it. But we offer good value for our £96annual membership fee. And most of our 117,000 members agree. Our latestindependent research found that three-quarters of members “value thestatus [their] CIPD membership carries”; two-thirds feel the CIPD hashelped their career development and provides thought leadership; and 88 percent agree that it speaks with authority on professional issues. It isn’t just an internal love-in, either. Membership has grown by 56 percent since 1995. Usage of our website has risen by 17 per cent in the past yearto 150,000 user sessions and seven million hits a month – half of which are bynon-members. So what have the modern day Romans of the people management and developmentprofession ever done for you? The CIPD has more than 35,000 students. A quarter study through the flexiblelearning route, and 4,700 graduated last year. And we have just finishedre-accrediting hundreds of our qualification providers against a new set ofprofessional standards. We have introduced innovative certified programmes, such as our advancede-learning certificate. Around 12,000 delegates took part in CIPD trainingevents and courses last year, while HRD week in April is the premier event inEurope for training professionals. The institute has also led the way in demonstrating links between HRpractices and organisation performance. We will release case studies on makingthese relationships happen at a public sector conference with the CabinetOffice in March, and in May, we will publish results from our two-year studyinto organisations such as Jaguar, Tesco and Nationwide. We draw many senior professionals into our work, with an influential groupof vice-presidents and policy panels. Those who have recently been involved onour information and consultation taskforce include the HR directors of Corus,Granada, and the Prison Service, while the HR/organisation design directors ofM&S, Cadbury Schweppes and Oxfam were part of our ‘Organising for Success’group. More than 500 CEOs and HR directors took part in this latter study. Our annual conference and exhibition in Harrogate attracts more than 7,000visitors, including leading thinkers such as Gary Hamel, Charles Handy andMichael Porter. We also offer a huge range of information and advice on practical issues. Werun a dozen surveys of trends and practices each year, with 5,000 copiesdownloaded for free each month. As many as 14,000 people a month view the QuickFacts section on our website, and 3,500 people use our library and legaltelephone helplines each month. Our specialist forums have 6,000 members andhold 40 events a year, and our 48 branches host more than 300. But are we influential? Last year, the CIPD’s media coverage doubled, with200 mentions a month in the press. Examples include our absence survey andpensions work on BBC Business Breakfast, and features in the FinancialTimes on organisation design and human capital research. We have strengthened our relationships with the Government to betterrepresent our members’ views. For example, we helped the DTI host discussiongroups on information and consultation, and chaired the Department of Work andPension’s working party on age diversity. Contributing to the public good is also an important objective. Our work onemploying ex-offenders has drawn this issue to national attention. More than40,000 free copies of the findings have been distributed. Along with Businessin the Community, we are researching the effects of corporate social responsibilityon career decisions, and producing free member guides on CSR and pensions. The challenges facing the profession are rapidly shifting, and the CIPDneeds to continually improve its response. Plans for the next year includeadopting chartered individual membership status, redesigning the website, freemember toolkits, implementing new member communications and further enhancingour conferences and courses. We would welcome feedback from the HR community, but remember: Rome was notbuilt in a day. center_img Comments are closed. Ralph Tribe, CIPD member and vice-president of HR for a global media companyWhen will the CIPD will stop telling the HR profession how relevant it isand how much value it creates, and start asking us? When people – particularly senior members – talk about the CIPD, they almostinvariably express a huge frustration with its inability to demonstratetangible value. The CIPD clearly has an obligation to address this perception.Yet disappointingly, its leadership has consistently chosen to ignore ordispute this feedback, arrogantly dismissing it as a marginal view, rather thana mainstream one. The organisation draws significant revenues from membership fees and othercommercial activities (nearly £30m per annum), but seems largely incapable ofredistributing that value in any measurable or meaningful way to its members orto the profession – which presumably is the sole reason for its existence. HRprofessionals are entering an era where failure to demonstrate measurable valueis no longer an option. Yet the leaders of our professional institute seemunwilling to respond thoughtfully or constructively to this challengethemselves – it feels like a case of ‘do as I say, not as I do’. No doubt the CIPD will respond to my opinions with protestations that itdoes offer value for money to its members, through its support of strategic HR,its achievement of chartered status, its educational efforts, and the ‘valuefor money’ products and services it provides. But such assertions are questionable. Its lack of strategic impact isblindingly obvious to anyone remotely interested in seeing tangible results. Itis likely that the CIPD has spent millions over the years on research that islargely unknown or inaccessible, and which therefore fails to educate orinfluence. Ask yourself: what specific piece of CIPD research has genuinelymade any difference to you or your organisation? I assume the silence isdeafening. With regard to chartered status, the CIPD apparently fails to see thehypocrisy in trying to create a closed shop within a profession where most ofus want to make it easier for good people from other disciplines to move intoHR, not harder. On education, surely most of the credit has to go to theinstitutions providing it, rather than the institute. And in terms of products and services, the CIPD doesn’t provide anythingthat other commercial organisations couldn’t deliver to us – often at lower orzero cost. For example, two of the three main publications in the HR market arefree to readers, and yet our own institute effectively charges us via ourmembership fees for receiving the third. It advertises this as an importantbenefit of paid membership. Should we really feel grateful? Similarly, we are apparently lucky enough to receive a discounted rate forthe Harrogate conference. Yet, among others, Richmond Events (which runssomething comparable on the Oriana) provides free access for delegates –commercial exhibitors fully subsidise delegates, effectively paying for theright to talk to us. The CIPD charges HR vendors to talk to us, but in contrast, it also chargesus for the privilege. Anyone who has seen its palatial surroundings in Wimbledon, or noticed thedirector-general Geoff Armstrong’s compensation package – which comfortablyexceeds £300,000 a year – has to wonder whether the creation of member value isthe absolute priority it should be for this leadership team. Where is the valuethat the CIPD’s significant revenues should be delivering? If the CIPD is to avoid a crisis, Armstrong and his colleagues need to wakeup to the fact that their membership is increasingly disenfranchised oralienated to the point where, if there were a credible alternative professionalbody for HR professionals, a frighteningly high proportion of us would probablydefect without a backward glance. The CIPD must start listening. If it can’t deliver a more compelling valueproposition for our membership, then it doesn’t deserve our loyalty, and wewill have to go it alone. last_img read more

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Homestead Stables Equestrian Center Pauses Operations

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first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) WNY News Now File Image.GERRY — Homestead Stables, a local horse center offering inter-generational equestrian opportunities, boarding, training, lessons, and a therapeutic riding program, will pause operations starting Sept. 1.Lisa Haglund, Heritage President and CEO, said the Homestead Stables Equestrian Center will pause all operations and will, while shut down, conduct a feasibility study, competitive analysis, and due diligence to determine what the Center’s future might look like, or when operations may resume.“Heritage has always been committed to putting the safety and well-being of all God’s creatures we’ve been entrusted to care for as our top priority, including those who called the Homestead Stables their home. It is with sincere gratitude that we thank our community for their patience and understanding as we work through the many challenges of this global pandemic,” Haglund said.“Throughout the pandemic, we have been forced to suspend stables events, lessons, and clinics. The heavy financial burden of this pandemic has also forced us to make many difficult decisions across all of Heritage,” she went on to say. last_img read more

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Miami forum discusses public funding of judicial campaigns

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first_img Miami forum discusses public funding of judicial campaigns Miami forum discusses public funding of judicial campaigns May 15, 2002 Regular Newscenter_img The idea of public financing of judicial campaigns is gaining momentum nationwide as well as in Florida, according to Edith Osman of Miami, a former president of The Florida Bar and a member of the ABA Standing Committee on Judicial Independence.“It is incumbent on the legal profession to find ways to better the current system of judicial selection,” Osman said. “Although Florida voters last year rejected merit retention for trial judges, a great many people think the time is ripe to re-evaluate judicial selection because so many people are uncomfortable with current methods of financing judicial campaigns.”Two leaders of the ABA’s effort to enhance judicial independence, D. Dudley Oldham of Houston and Edward Madeira, Jr., of Philadelphia, met with Florida and Dade bar leaders recently to discuss judicial qualifications and public financing of judicial campaigns.“The American Bar Association is providing a variety of solutions to problems that plague judicial selection and threaten the independence of the judiciary,” said Oldham, chair of the ABA Standing Committee on Judicial Independence.“Public financing of judicial campaigns is another option recently recommended by the ABA. It is important to remember that regardless of the selection method used in individual states, Americans want fair and impartial judges. Respect for the rule of law is what sets our country apart and makes our system of government an example for all.”He said that North Carolina, Wisconsin, Texas, and several other states are giving serious consideration to public financing proposals.Miami bar leaders, even those on opposite sides of the merit selection issue when it appeared on the ballot in the November 2000 election, expressed support for public financing of judicial campaigns. They said judges should be removed from a process that requires them to raise large amounts of campaign money, and one proponent said public financing of judicial campaigns in Dade County would cost only $1.5 million, according to Oldham.Stephen Zack, a Miami lawyer who serves as chair of the ABA Standing Committee on Bar Activities and Services, told the gathering that it would be “fabulous” if public financing could be enacted for $1.5 million, but he said perhaps the cost would be higher.Proponents said they hoped Florida legislators would approve a “local option” on public financing allowing each county to decide whether to finance judicial campaigns with public money.Madeira, chair of the ABA Commission on State Judicial Selection Standards, said people across America are concerned about the qualifications of judges, and that proposed judicial eligibility panel could evaluate judicial candidates’ qualifications.“The standards adopted by the ABA are intended to be consistent with merit-based selection of judges, and in states such as Florida, where the voters have chosen to continue electing trial court judges, the standards can be used as a basis to improve public confidence that qualified judges are being elected,” Madeira said.last_img read more

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MBB : WALKING THE WALK: Behind Walker’s 33 points, UConn beats SU in overtime in Big East semifinal

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first_imgNEW YORK — Just when it appeared Syracuse might shift the momentum in its direction in overtime Friday, Kemba Walker reminded everybody why some consider him the best player in the country. His coach, Connecticut’s Jim Calhoun, declared it himself.Walker scored four of the Huskies’ eight points in overtime, and carried UConn all evening to a 76-71 victory over No. 11 Syracuse (26-7) in front of a sold out crowd of 19,375 at Madison Square Garden. The Connecticut star and a National Player of the Year candidate willed his team to victory by scoring 33 points to go along with 12 rebounds, six steals and five assists. Walker had as many or more in each of those categories than anyone else on the floor for either team.And his 111 points during the Big East Tournament sets a league record. He’s only six points away from breaking the record for points in any conference tournament.‘MVP in America, bar none,’ Calhoun said. ‘You cannot question it.’Prior to the tournament, some apparently had. Though selected first team All-Big East, one league coach didn’t place a first team vote for Walker, who leads the league in scoring. Walker subsequently finished second in Big East Player of the Year voting.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBut he played like the league’s best player Friday. Syracuse had no answer for Walker, as he shot 9-of-18 from the field and 13-of-14 from the line.After Walker willed the No. 19 Huskies (25-9) to their fourth win in as many days, Calhoun took issue with those who may have been skeptical of Walker’s value.‘I think he’s the MVP of any college basketball team in America,’ Calhoun said. ‘And I’m going to keep saying that because you’ve got a chance to witness what we’ve witnessed over the past 30-somewhat games.’Scoop Jardine, who drilled back-to-back 3s to send the game into overtime, missed a 3-pointer at the top of the key with 14.2 seconds remaining in overtime that would have tied the game at 74.Walker made two free throws on the other end to secure the win. It was just a small glimpse into what did all game, slicing through SU’s 2-3 zone and either finishing or finding and open teammate when the defense collapsed.Walker didn’t make his first field goal attempt until 7:29 left in the first half, but he worked at drawing the defense’s focus and opened things up for his teammates.In the second half, he caught fire. Walker scored 23 points in the second half and overtime.‘We let Kemba get too much penetration,’ Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim said. ‘We tried to double him every chance we could but he’s very difficult. He’s as good a player as there is in college basketball right now.’He did it all in his fourth game in four days. In Thursday’s game against Pittsburgh and Friday’s against SU, Walker never sat, playing all 85 minutes.Syracuse still had its chances, and with eight minutes and change to go in the second half, the Orange jumped out in front. After a horrific shooting performance in the first half, SU rattled off an 11-2 run in the middle of the second half to take a 55-52 lead. Kris Joseph made the rare 4-point play — knocking down a 3 from the top of the arc while being fouled by Walker — to put SU in front.SU finished the second half shooting 52 percent, including 6-of-11 from downtown.Despite all that, Walker’s gigantic performance proved too much to overcome.‘It’s the Big East,’ Jardine said. ‘Kemba Walker is one of the best players in the country, and it’s exciting to play against him and it brings the best out of you.’With Walker leading the way, the Huskies answered back and stole back any positive momentum SU had remaining. Jeremy Lamb nailed a jumper off a Walker assist and UConn reclaimed the lead with six minutes to play.Syracuse forced overtime, but never led, as Walker scored the first two points of the extra period. And he scored the last two points, the two free throws that sealed game after Jardine’s missed game-tying 3-point attempt.UConn now advances to the Big East title game. While Syracuse heads home to prepare for the NCAA Tournament, Walker and the Huskies will try to win their fifth game in five days against Louisville, winners of the second semifinal.‘We’re playing hard and together and good things are happening for us,’ Walker said. ‘The bright lights are on and it’s time to shine. Everybody said we couldn’t do this and we’re just shocking the world.’[email protected] Comments Published on March 10, 2011 at 12:00 pmcenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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