爱上海,上海419论坛,上海龙凤419 – Powered by Brooklynn Wilbert!

UK at work

Posted on by

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. UK at workOn 22 May 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Asnapshot of UK employees’ attitudes to work seems to suggest companies arefailing to address some of their basic grievances and risk losing skilledstaff. Complacent employers beware, findings by the Aon Loyalty Institute andPersonnel Today may shock. Jane Lewis reportsBritishemployers are homing in on the wrong priorities in the drive to attract andretain talent, according to the Aon Loyalty Institute and Personnel Today’s annualstudy of workplace commitment, UK @ Work 2001. The message is that companiesare still not listening to what their staff really want, with many ignoringbasic needs in favour of what might be termed the bells and whistles of companylife.Inthe rush to prove their fashionable credentials as enlightened employers,companies are concentrating too much on issues like work-life balance, says thereport. Many are so preoccupied with the minutiae of achieving the rightworkplace utopia and dreaming up ever-more imaginative benefits, that they’vetaken their eye off the main ball. Fundamental issues such as improving payrates, keeping job security strong and reducing stress, have been relegated tothe sidelines.Yetit is clear from the responses of the 1,507 employees canvassed – across age,employment sector and position – that these basic needs remain their mainpriority at work. And the failure to meet them could have some fairly drasticconsequences for employers. Certainly, the survey – which above all aims toreveal the perspective of the employee – demonstrates surprising levels ofapathy, if not outright discontent, with companies. Only four out of 10 of thepeople canvassed would recommend their organisation as the best place to work.And over half give their company a “failing grade” when assessingbenefit and pay programme terms. Roughly the same percentage would happily swapsome of their fancy new benefits for more take-home pay. Loyalty, it seems, isa cheap commodity. Two-thirds of those polled would quit their job without asecond thought for a pay rise of 10-20 per cent or less elsewhere.Thepicture painted by the survey will clearly worry employers – particularly giventhe current economic backdrop of high employment rates and skills shortages,which 70 per cent of companies say are causing them major headaches. It’s timefor employers to get back to basics, says Aon. Forget the fancy stuff and startworking on what really counts. “First companies must create organisationsin which employees are safe, secure and as stress free as possible,” saysmanaging consultant, Craig Lydiate. “Then they must enhance this byproviding pay and benefits that are competitive and meet employee needs.”Becausethe survey shows a wide disparity between the levels of contentment shown bydifferent employee groups – men, on the whole, were chaffing at the bit farmore than women – Aon suggests that employers start evaluating the needs ofthose most “at risk” of defecting. Then they must act quickly to putin place the right plans to assuage these malcontents.Noone needs reminding of the importance of becoming a properly responsiveemployer. “Organisations that listen to their employees’ collective voicewill gain the information to manage human capital risks more effectively,”says the survey. And what that means in practice is competitive advantage.”By getting back to basics, organisations can attract and retain committedemployees and ensure their success in an uncertain future.”1.Investigating commitmentThisyear’s survey builds on the Workforce Commitment Index developed by Aon lastyear. The 2000 baseline index was created by combining six component questionsinto a single measure with a possible score of 100. The nearer the score is to100 – or even beyond – the higher level of commitment. In 2001 the overallindex fell slightly to 99 – “indicating very little change in overallcommitment”. But that’s no reason for companies to rest on their laurels.Thisfigure stands out in marked contrast to the much more positive 70 per cent whorated their organisation’s products and services highly – indicating that whileUK workers are proud of what they produce, they are far less enamoured with theenvironment in which they do it. And although the vast majority is not activelylooking to jump ship, they would be easily persuaded to do so for a slight payincrease. Nearly two-thirds say they would move if offered a similar job with aslightly higher salary.Butlevels of commitment vary widely according to different demographic andgeographical factors. Unsurprisingly, those organisations perceived to be onthe up (perhaps having undergone a recent expansion) can expect much higherlevels of commitment from staff than those engaged in downsizing. Insecurity isclearly the most effective recipe for disloyalty. And size does count. Whileorganisations with a head count larger than 1,000 staff scored commitmentpoints above the 100 level, and small companies achieved a respectable 98,those in the middle, the SMEs with a head count of between 500-1,000, scoredway below average on 94.Oneof the most optimistic findings for Britain as a society was that the muchput-upon workers in education, healthcare and the public sector as a whole,continued to display the highest commitment levels of all. The lowest were tobe found in manufacturing, the service industries and transportation,communications, and utilities – no doubt reflecting a greater sense of uneasewith future prospects in these increasingly troubled sectors.Unsurprisingly,the higher up staff are in an organisation, the greater their sense of buy-in.While executives scored a whopping 112 on the commitment stakes, manuallabourers repaid their comparatively lowly status with a nonchalant 90.8.Thesurvey shows that issues like age, gender and geographical location can alsohave a big effect on how employees see their companies. If companies are aftera really loyal workforce, they need to be in either Wales (104.5), or to theEast Midlands (104.1). Predictably enough, London-based workers are some of theleast reliable in terms of overall commitment. But the real flibbertigibbetsare to be found in Yorkshire and Humberside (93.3). When it comes to stayingpower, the group most at risk of defection is males under 30 who have alreadybeen with the company between six and 10 years. If this group makes up the bulkof your workforce, start worrying.2.Workplace practicesWhatreally drives the commitment of your employees and how good is yourorganisation at matching these needs? To assess this, Aon and Personnel Todayidentified five conditions or factors which impact on commitment – safety andsecurity (physical and psychological); rewards (remuneration and benefits);affiliation (the extent to which employees feel “part of the team”);growth (the opportunities for learning and gaining experience) and finallywork-life balance.Althougha high percentage (70-80 per cent) scored their companies well in terms ofensuring job security and a safe environment in which to work, companies felldown when it came to managing stress levels. In fact nearly 40 per cent ofthose canvassed reported “they had problems” with this over the pastyear, with most citing overwork, long hours and poor management as underlyingcauses.Inother words, nearly half of UK employees feel they are not being adequatelyrecompensed for their labours. And between 26 and 29 per cent claimed theirbenefits’ packages are below both their expectations and what they and theirfamilies needed. Given that the overwhelming majority believe that a goodpackage is an important factor preventing them from looking for a jobelsewhere, this rising groundswell of discontent is clearly significant.Andit is equally clear that employers frequently get the wrong end of the stickwhen it comes to assessing the right balance of pay and benefits. Over half ofrespondents would rather forgo some of their current benefits in exchange formore pay. Thegood news for employers is that internal company division over pay is not areal issue – most people surveyed believed they were fairly paid compared toothers in their organisations. But a larger number remained convinced that thegrass is nonetheless greener elsewhere. Nearly a third believe the same jobwould pay more in a different company. “Beingpart of something larger than oneself has been understood as part of humanpsychology for decades,” states the survey. “UK employees want to bepart of a team. They want to have input in making changes.” But although ahigh percentage (83 per cent) are convinced their organisation trusts them todo what is right for the company, nearly half feel they hadn’t had theopportunity to prove themselves in a change situation. Another tranche ofrespondents (nearly a third) claimed their organisation wasn’t doing enough toencourage a sense of company spirit and pride. The overall picture appears tobe one of frustration – employees feel they are neither sufficiently inspired,nor empowered to work for the good of the company.Despitepersonal gripes about lack of action, the survey showed most employees thinktheir companies are heading in the right direction – embracing change andcommunicating and managing it effectively.Evenmore reassuringly, a high percentage (85 per cent) are impressed with theirmanagement’s commitment to continuously improve products and services. But onceagain, this rosy picture of successful company life begins to fade whenemployees start considering their personal growth opportunities. Nearlyone-third report their expectations aren’t being met, and a similar numberclaim they are not being well enough informed about opportunities fordevelopment within the company.Thehard work many companies have put in to help employees strike the rightwork-life balance appears to be paying off – in part. In fact, respondents aresplit on this point. Just as many claim their management’s attitude to theirpersonal concerns falls below expectations. What is clear, says the survey, isthat a little more give and take is needed. “Committed employees arewilling to ‘go the extra mile’ for their organisation. Employers mustunderstand that committed employees still need to manage their personallives.” The majority of respondents are much more positive about the day-to-dayhelp they got from their peers with over 83 per cent claiming they enjoy goodsupport “as a person, not just as a worker”.3.ConclusionsUKworkers are only moderately committed to their workplaces, despite the factthat most think their organisation is performing well. At the root of theproblem is their poor perception about what they are getting out of companiesas individuals. Many clearly think they should be paid more, and a large numberbelieve their talents remain unexploited – both in terms of developing newskills and progressing within the company. The fact that so many complained ofa lack of spirit and pride in their companies is equally damaging.Ultimately,concludes the survey, the solution lies in a return to first priorities. Unlessthe basic needs of employees are met, “further investment in the areas ofwork-life balance and strategic organisational development will not achieve theexpected return on investment.” So it’s back to basics, then.last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

60-Year-Old Man Dies From COVID-19 In Chautauqua County

Posted on by

first_imgWNY News Now / MGN Stock Image.MAYVILLE – A 60-year-old Chautauqua County man with underlying health conditions has died after being sickened with COVID-19.County Health officials reported the news on Tuesday.This is the third COVID-19 related death reported this week, with 13 people dying from the virus since the outbreak started.Three new cases of infection were also reported on Tuesday, all residents living in Dunkirk. There are now 48 active cases, with 295 people under quarantine or isolation orders by the Public Health Director.Not all of those being monitored are confirmed to have COVID-19 but have either shown symptoms, are awaiting results, or have risk factors.Three people are hospitalized with the virus in the county.To date there have been 701 confirmed cases of the virus with 640 recovering. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , .

Russian police detain footballers facing ‘lifetime ban’ over assault on officials

Posted on by

first_imgThey are also facing a possible five-year jail term after video footage caught them attacking two Russian trade ministry officials in an upscale Moscow cafe. Police said the players have been detained as suspects under criminal investigation.“Pavel Mamaev has been detained according to the criminal code for 48 hours. He is suspected of hooliganism,” police spokeswoman Irina Volk told TASS state news agency.Around an hour later, police told Russian news agencies that Kokorin had also been detained as a suspect for the same time period.The footage showed one of the officials, Denis Pak, an ethnic Korean, being hit with a chair while eating a meal. Now the former Russian international players, who have courted controversy in the past, could be banned for life from playing in Russia.“This case is unusual in terms of our football and the league has addressed a request to the ethics committee of the Russian Football Union to impose a lifetime ban on Mamaev and Kokorin,” Premier League spokesman Sergei Alekseyev said Wednesday. Although they have not yet been formally charged, the pair have been named by police as suspects in a criminal probe over hooliganism.Responding to a police summons, Mamaev arrived at Moscow’s police’s central investigation department on Wednesday afternoon for questioning. Kokorin then missed a 6pm deadline to appear for questioning, but police later confirmed he had arrived. Neither player was seen by waiting journalists.Krasnodar has pledged to terminate Mamaev’s contract while Zenit has condemned Kokorin’s role as “disgusting”. The Saint Petersburg club removed all t-shirts bearing his name following reports of the attack.Pak’s lawyer Gennadiy Udunyan earlier told Russian state television: “They started to mock (Pak’s) ethnicity”. The players then allegedly assaulted Pak when he made a critical comment.He added: “He has a concussion.”Before the cafe assault the footballers attacked the driver of a television host and damaged her Mercedes in a separate incident on Monday.The driver was hospitalised with injuries and a criminal probe was opened.On Tuesday, Russian President Vladimir Putin’s spokesman Dmitry Peskov said the Kremlin — “just like the whole country” — was aware of the incident and described the video as “rather unpleasant”.– ‘Lowlifes who went berserk’ –Krasnodar forward Pavel Mamaev in action against Nolito of Spanish side Sevilla. © AFP/File / STRINGERCommentators, meanwhile, were keen to underline the players were not part of the Russia team that punched above its weight to reach the quarter-finals as hosts of the World Cup this summer. “We should specify that those two…are not currently members of the national squad,” Igor Rabiner, a columnist for the Russian daily newspaper Sport Express, told AFP.Kokorin last played for the national side in late 2017, while Mamaev was last selected in 2016.Rabiner added: “The players who represented Russia at the World Cup dramatically changed the country’s attitude to the game with their successful performance and that is diametrically opposed to this pair’s deeds.”For Alexei Lebedev, chief sports writer at Moskovsky Komsomolets daily, the ugly incident following the World Cup euphoria “has already transformed the image of Russian football and, unfortunately, not in the right direction.”“Fortunately, however, those responsible for Russian football and the Russian Premier League have understood this well,” he said. “They reacted strongly.”It is not the first time the players’ behaviour has raised eyebrows.The RFU suspended the pair in July 2016 after a video emerged from a Monte Carlo nightclub in which Mamaev and Kokorin allegedly spent $296,000 (258,000 euros) on a champagne-fuelled party following Euro 2016, where Russia flopped.Kokorin, who sat out this year’s World Cup with a knee injury, later apologised for his behaviour and was welcomed back into the national team. Mamaev last played for Russia at Euro 2016.“Now they’re just lowlifes who went berserk,” Rabiner added. “Just ill-bred people who went crazy on the huge money that they receive from their clubs.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Russian footballer Alexander Kokorin in action for Zenit Saint Petersburg against Slavia Prague. © AFP/File / Olga MALTSEVAMoscow, Russian Federation, Oct 10 – Russian police on Wednesday evening detained disgraced footballers Pavel Mamaev and Alexander Kokorin for 48 hours as suspects in a criminal probe following an unprovoked attack on two government officials.Premier League chiefs have requested a lifetime ban for Krasnodar midfielder Mamaev and Zenit Saint Petersburg forward Kokorin.last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

Rearranging Deck Chairs on Sinking Planet Theories

Posted on by

first_imgSupernovas come in handy as theory rescue devices.Fortified iron: Here’s a puzzle: moon rocks have measurable levels of iron-60, Space.com says. But they shouldn’t. Iron-60 has a half-life of 2.6 million years, far too short to have been there billions of years ago when the moon supposedly formed. To keep the moon old, astronomers propose the following auxiliary hypothesis:Now, scientists have discovered unusually high levels of iron-60 in moon rocks gathered during Apollo missions 12, 15 and 16 between 1969 and 1972. This finding suggests that debris from a nearby supernova sprayed Earth and the rest of the solar system in the past few million years.Have they thought through the consequences on life if a supernova sprayed the Earth between 1.7 and 2.6 million years ago, when human ancestors were roaming Africa in the evolutionary scheme?Magnetic magic: One thing we do know is that Earth is better off with its moon. A sun-like star named Kappa Ceti is showing astronomers that a magnetic field is critical for life, Astrobiology Magazine says. Space.com points out that a magnetic field would have been crucial when the Earth formed to keep it from getting sterilized by the superflares that young suns are prone to. Now, PhysOrg adds that the moon–among its many benefits for life—now appears to “play a major role in maintaining Earth’s magnetic field.” Actually, this proposal turns out to be a theory rescue device for another problem:To maintain this magnetic field until the present day, the classical model required the Earth’s core to have cooled by around 3,000° C over the past 4.3 billion years. Now, a team of researchers from CNRS and Université Blaise Pascal suggests that, on the contrary, its temperature has fallen by only 300° C. The action of the moon, overlooked until now, is thought to have compensated for this difference and kept the geodynamo active.Blasting gold: Where does gold come from? Science Daily proposes that it comes from supernovas, but “At this time, no one knows the answer.” The puzzle goes for other heavy elements, too. A downstream problem is how it arrived in sufficient quantities on the surface of Earth to cover the tomb of Tutankhamen and other ancient works of art (see 10/20/15 and 3/17/13).Missing dwarfs: Is it dwarfs or dwarves? Whichever, they’re missing. Science Daily tells about “the missing brown dwarfs” that are too large to be planets but too small to be stars. They should be all over the place, but the sky turned up empty in a search. It’s crisis time again. Planets are supposed to be composed of heavy elements that formed in supernovas. Now, the supernova deficit impinges on a star-formation deficit.The scientists concluded that there should be many more brown dwarfs in the solar neighbourhood that are yet to be discovered and that will fill the observed gap. If they are right, this would mean that star formation fails significantly more often than previously thought, producing one brown dwarf for every four stars. In any case, it appears, the established picture of the solar neighbourhood and of its brown dwarf population will have to be rethought.Rearrange the chairs again: The problems reported above are subsumed in a bigger problem reported by New Scientist. The headline, “How two tiny dots defy the history of life and the solar system,” indicates that zircons from Australia’s Jack Hills formation are throwing theories into a tizzy, and along with that, the notions of a Late Heavy Bombardment so trendy in solar system formation models. “When it came to explaining how these things all got started, we thought we had it more or less worked out,” Colin Stuart writes, indicating that prior confidence was unwarranted. “It was a nice story,” he laments. His chart shows how these zircons require scrapping the LHB, moving planetary migration half a billion years earlier, and moving the origin of life 300 million years earlier. But with those corrections, other things stretch and break. How did the Earth cool so fast? How did life get started so quickly? When were the large impact basins on the moon formed? “Future work” will be required to put the new pieces together without breaking something else.Modern science marches on. Aren’t you glad we have such wise and competent wizards to explain reality? The reality of the 1970s, of course, never was reality to begin with. Today’s reality may be tomorrow’s fiction. There are an infinite number of ways to rearrange the deck chairs, so these adjustments are likely to continue far past our lifetimes. Each generation will be presented with a comforting picture of reality to keep the funding flowing to the scientific wizards. Occasional anomalies are good for this system; it keeps them looking busy. If they ever figured everything out, there would be nothing more to do but keep climbing, until they reach the summit, where the theologians have been sitting for centuries. (Visited 22 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , .

Zika cases in Rajasthan monitored

Posted on by

last_img

Tagged: , , , , , , , .