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Arts Quarter surveys cultural organisations’ income

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first_img Tagged with: Giving/Philanthropy recession Research / statistics Arts and not-for-profit sector specialists Arts Quarter has released the findings of its Fundraising and Revenue Generation Survey.It reveals what Arts Quarter describe as “a mixed picture”. While many cultural and other not-for-profit organisations reported declines in many areas of fundraising, others are reporting an increase in their wider revenue generation, comparing their results on the previous year.The survey was conducted over January and February 2009 and attracted responses from 306 organisations across the UK.A number of respondents also provided insights into a range of ways in which they are seeking to address any potential shortfalls in the medium term which we have included within the full report.Arts Quarter were able to use the data to compare the situation in cultural sector organisations against that for the wider charity sector.They found that the cultural sector had suffered marginally more from a drop in corporate support than the wider charitable community. Organisations were typically either having to demonstrate even greater value to their sponsors than before, or were reporting that companies had completely withdrawn their support.In contrast, cultural organisations were faring better than the wider charitable sector in terms of retaining funding from grantmaking trusts.Cultural organisations were suffering a higher rate of decline than other charities in individual giving of gifts of less than £1,000.They survey enabled Arts Quarter to compare organisations in London with those elsewhere in the UK.The survey confirmed that both cultural and other charitable organisations outside London were suffering greater declines in corporate giving than those in London. However, London-based organisations reported a greater decline in support from Trusts for both project support and core funding than those based elsewhere in the UK. Similarly, levels of individual giving were also stronger outside London.A copy of the full report is available at no charge from Arts Quarter.www.artsquarter.co.uk/news.html AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 13 March 2009 | News Arts Quarter surveys cultural organisations’ income  36 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Sugar the main health target of 2014

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first_imgA group of health experts and academics have pledged to tackle rising obesity by combating sugar.The new group, called ‘Action on Sugar’, claims that sugar has become as dangerous as alcohol or tobacco.Action on Sugar has been set up by the team behind Consensus Action on Salt and Health (CASH), which has pushed for cuts to salt intake since the 1990s. The campaign has called on food producers to dramatically reduce levels of sugar in everyday products.They are also asking companies to stop advertising sugary drinks and snacks to children.Action on Sugar chairman Graham MacGregor, who is Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at the Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine and set up CASH in 1996, said: “We must now tackle the obesity epidemic both in the UK and worldwide.“This is a simple plan, which gives a level playing field to the food industry and must be adopted by the Department of Health to reduce the completely unnecessary and very large amounts of sugar the food and soft drinks industry is currently adding to our foods.”Simon Capewell, Professor of Clinical Epidemiology at the University of Liverpool, UK, said: “Sugar is the new tobacco.“Everywhere, sugary drinks and junk foods are now pressed on unsuspecting parents and children by a cynical industry focused on profit not health.“The obesity epidemic is already generating a huge burden of disease and death.”last_img read more

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Chan School study estimates higher death toll in Puerto Rico from hurricane

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first_imgThe mortality rate in Puerto Rico rose by 62 percent [95 percent confidence interval (CI) 11 percent to 114 percent] after Hurricane Maria, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study was conducted in January and February 2018, in collaboration with colleagues from Carlos Albizu University in Puerto Rico and the University of Colorado School of Medicine.The researchers concluded that the original estimate of 64 excess deaths due to Hurricane Maria is likely to be a substantial underestimate. The study estimates a death rate of 14.3 deaths per 1,000 [95 percent CI 9.8 to 18.9] between Sept. 20 and Dec. 31, 2017, up from a rate of 8.8 deaths per thousand at the same time in 2016. About one-third of the reported deaths in the households surveyed in the study were attributed to delayed or prevented access to medical care.The study was published online May 29, 2018 in the New England Journal of Medicine.Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico on Sept. 20, 2017, inflicting approximately $90 billion worth of damage and displacing thousands of residents. The storm disrupted medical services across the island, and many households were left for weeks without water, electricity, or cell phone coverage.As with any major natural disaster, assessing the loss of life caused by Hurricane Maria was difficult and contentious. For disaster-related deaths to be confirmed in Puerto Rico, bodies must be transported to San Juan or a medical examiner must travel to the region to verify the death. This makes it difficult to log deaths that were caused by delays in treatment or chronic conditions that worsened in the aftermath of the storm. In December 2017, media reports suggested that the official death toll was significantly underestimated.To produce an independent estimate of lives lost as a result of the storm, the researchers surveyed 3,299 randomly chosen households across Puerto Rico. Participants were asked about infrastructure damage, displacement, and deaths. Results from the survey showed that there were an estimated 14.3 deaths per 1,000 people between Maria’s landfall and the end of 2017. By comparing this post-hurricane mortality rate with the same time period in 2016, the researchers estimated that there were 4,645 [95 percent CI, 793 to 8498] additional deaths in the three-month period following Hurricane Maria.In addition to a significantly higher death toll, the study showed that the average household went approximately 41 days without cell phone service, 68 days without water, and 84 days without electricity following the storm. More than 30 percent of surveyed households reported interruptions to medical care, with trouble accessing medications and powering respiratory equipment being the most frequently cited challenges.Household-based surveys such as these are well studied in the scientific literature and offer a cost-effective, rapid approach in the aftermath of a disaster. The researchers have made all of their anonymized data, analysis, and code publicly available for review.Support for the study came from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Section of Wilderness and Environmental Medicine. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Heart Health

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first_imgBy Connie CrawleyUniversity of Georgia Every year we try to convince ourselves to adopt healthy habits that will reduce our risk of heart disease. Even though we understand the importance of making these changes, our American lifestyle makes it hard to do. Weight control is one of the main ways to reduce the risk of heart disease. Over 60 percent of Americans are overweight or obese. Much of the problem is due to physical inactivity, large portion sizes and eating out too often. Sadly, we are passing these habits on to our children, who are likely to develop heart disease even sooner than their older relatives. Portion control can be difficult. Most of us clean our plates no matter how much we are served. Research shows that if people are given larger portions, they eat one-third more no matter how hungry they are. A good strategy at home is to use the smallest plate, bowl or cup available.Serving sizes at restaurants have exploded in the last 15 years. To cut back, share a meal with someone else. You will save calories and money. If half an entrée is not enough, order an additional vegetable soup made with broth or a salad with light dressing on the side. If you are alone and cannot share, take the extra food home to eat the next day. If you ask, some restaurants will serve smaller lunch portions at supper. At fast-food restaurants, order the junior sizes and ask for those special sauces, which usually add 100 to 200 calories and lots of fat, to be left off. To quickly estimate your portion, think of a deck of cards. This is equal to about four ounces or half of a cup. A serving of meat, chicken or poultry or a portion of rice, potatoes or pasta should be about this size. No matter where you eat, fill your plate with streamed vegetables and fresh fruits. Replace red meat with salmon, tuna, trout or other fish (not fried) at least twice a week. Also have nonfat and reduced-fat milk, yogurt and cheese. These are the best foods for your heart. Eat more non-starchy vegetables like green beans, broccoli, spinach, tomatoes, carrots and salad greens. To add flavor to vegetables, season them with herbs and spices or lemon juice instead of salt and sprinkle on a little olive or canola oil. If you have high triglycerides, eat less bread, potatoes, white rice and pasta. When you do eat bread, choose whole-wheat. Make sure whole-wheat flour is first on the ingredient list. Wheat flour or enriched wheat flour are not the same as whole-wheat flour. Use fruit for dessert and snacks. It is the original fast food and can be taken anywhere and easily carried in a purse, pocket or insulated lunch bag. You will be less tempted to have dessert if you know you have fruit readily available. Keep fruit portions to the size of a baseball. Again, larger servings may increase carbohydrate levels too much in those with triglyceride problems. Eating right is important, but so is being active.Walking briskly for 30 minutes a day reduces heart disease risk by about 32 percent. Increasing daily exercise to 60 minutes is even better for weight control. Consider both planned exercise, like riding an exercise bike or doing water aerobics, and activities of daily living like taking the stairs, doing yard work, walking to errands or washing the car. (Connie Crawley is a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension nutritionist with the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences.)last_img read more

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Governor Shumlin announces additional assistance package for towns

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first_imgGovernor Shumlin was joined by Treasurer Beth Pearce and other state leaders today to announce an Irene recovery package for municipalities struggling with the effects of the tropical storm. ‘We recognize that the disaster is putting a strain on local governments,’ Shumlin said.  ‘This assistance package will help ensure that they have the support they need to emerge stronger than before the storm hit.’The financial package includes: ·         $24 million in advanced State payments: To assist towns struggling with immediate cash flow needs, the State will advance payments of key state and federal programs.   $6.2 million in town highway funds have been delivered this week instead of on October 15.  $12.3 million in Current Use payments will be advanced this week rather than on November 15.  $5.8 million in Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILOT) payments will be delivered shortly, instead of by October 31.  This is not new revenue to municipalities, but faster revenue, and will help ease short-term cash needs. ·         Local bank loans:  Vermont’s local banks will be offering loans to communities in need with favorable terms.  ·         Municipal Bond Bank loans: The Municipal Bond Bank has initiated a program to assist towns with low-interest loans to finance response and recovery efforts.  In the short term, the Bond Bank will provide stop-gap funding to local banks as needed and may provide direct loans in the future. ·         FEMA Community Disaster Loan (CDL): The State has requested that FEMA initiate its CDL program to assist towns with low-interest loans. ‘The assistance we are announcing today will help the municipalities hard hit by Tropical Storm Irene,’ said Treasurer Beth Pearce.  ‘This package provides a series of options for communities; they can opt for all, none or part of the options beginning with short-term financing all the way through long-term bonding. The banks are on the ground providing short-term financing and the State is advancing payments to municipalities to provide some relief for their short-term cash needs.’ Towns are also struggling with the massive impact that Irene had on the municipal transportation infrastructure.  During the first week of Irene Emergency Response Vermont officials at VTrans realized the extent of damage to local roads and mobilized additional resources to aid towns.  VTrans reached out to the Regional Planning Commissions and the Vermont League of Cities and Towns for assistance.  Vermont’s 11 regional planning commissions (RPCs) formed a State Resource Coordination Center with the mission of helping towns with not only local highway recovery, but also other forms of storm-related assistance. Regional Commission staff have been assessing damage to the local system and today report that Irene washed away more than 1950 local roadway segments, undermined more than 917 culverts, and damaged more than 200 bridges owned by municipalities.   Today, 184 roads and 94 bridges, within the municipal system remain closed.  The regional commissions launched their emergency efforts in coordination with VTrans with the goal of helping towns get the majority of their roads open, safe and passable by winter. ‘The goal of our efforts is to work with towns face that continued stress and mobility challenges, and to help them get back on their feet and establish access through emergency repairs,’ said VTrans Secretary Brian Searles. Road assistance for towns includes: ·         Unmet Emergency Needs Assessment: VTrans has asked towns to request assistance for any unmet emergency needs.  Unmet emergency needs include closed bridges, failed roads, and impassable roads that need to be made safe and passable before winter.  Towns should submit that information to the Regional Commissions as soon as possible and VTrans will work to coordinate additional resources to help towns. ·         VTrans has found that there is a shortage of bridge parts nationwide due to the tremendous need brought on by weather all over the country.  To ensure that towns receive the temporary bridges they need before winter, VTrans will serve as a clearinghouse and source of information on bridge acquisition and a resource for ordering these structures and parts where needed. ·         VTrans and the RPCs will create and update town maps depicting open and closed town roads so the traveling public can plan accordingly. These maps are being used by customer service representatives at VTrans’ Irene Storm Call Center, which can be reached at 1-800-VERMONT. They are also available to the general public at the agency’s website at www.aot.state.vt.us(link is external). To view them, users should activate the ‘local roads and bridges’ section of the Google map.  Smart phone applications of the Google map are also accessible on the Vtrans website. ·         Associated General Contractors (AGC) Clearinghouse: AGC is coordinating Vermont contractors available to help towns repair damaged roads and bridges. This is the principal resource for towns that need outside contracting for rebuilding. ·         Public Assistance (PA) Teams: State & FEMA PA teams are on the ground assisting communities with paperwork needed to obtain reimbursement for FEMA-eligible costs. ‘Vermonters have responded to this disaster with determination, tenacity and hard work,’ said Governor Shumlin.  ‘It is in large part due to the indomitable spirit of Vermonters that our recovery is going so well.  All recovery is local and this package will help ensure that our communities have the support they need.’ ###last_img read more

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Christmas guides Orange to come-from-behind win

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first_imgOne week after playing what Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim called his worst half of the year, center Rakeem Christmas helped deliver the Orange a victory in its first Atlantic Coast Conference game as a member school.Christmas shined in the paint to keep the otherwise offensively lifeless Orange in the game during the second half before igniting the team’s comeback run with a big block on Hurricanes 7-foot center Tonye Jekiri.“He’s worked hard in practice,” Boeheim said. “I think there’s some opportunities for us to get him (the ball) there. We need to work on that and get better at that. I think he is certainly capable of scoring around the basket.”’Christmas finished with eight points and seven rebounds in No. 2 SU’s 49-44 win over the Hurricanes on Saturday. He missed a couple easy shots and lost a handful of close rebounds, but was arguably the determining factor down the stretch as SU rebounded from a six-point deficit with 12:23 to play. In a season where he’s received more wrath from Boeheim than any other player in games, it was finally Christmas’ turn to shine.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“We got down and I just wanted to go back in there, get strong and make big plays,” Christmas said. “And it got our team going.”He put back a C.J. Fair miss in traffic with 7:19 left and backed down Jekiri two possessions later for a close-range hook.While Trevor Cooney went 2-for-12 from beyond the arc and C.J. Fair failed to score for a 17-minute, 33-second stretch, Christmas stepped up offensively. Then he carried that momentum to the defensive side of the court, where he has struggled throughout the start of the year.Christmas made the defensive play of the game, turning away Jekiri. A rejection that Fair said got the Orange over the hump.“Rakeem made the key play when he went back and got that lob,” Boeheim said. “He made a huge play there.”With sophomore center DaJuan Coleman hampered by a left leg contusion, Christmas’ improved play will be crucial for Syracuse as it continues into conference play.If the offense that developed early in the season is joined by consistent rebounding and defensive efficiency, he’ll be a force to be reckoned with late in games.“We just come together as a team,” Christmas said. “We want to play hard when the game’s close like that.” Comments Published on January 4, 2014 at 8:12 pm Contact Stephen: [email protected] | @Stephen_Bailey1 Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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