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Daily abuses suffered by Nigeria’s journalists

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first_imgBefore April ended with the twin newspaper bombings in Abuja and Kaduna, there were two suspicious deaths of journalists. Reporters Without Borders is unable to determine whether they were linked to the victims’ work. On 16 April, Chuks Ogu, a journalist with the station Independent Television, was shot dead by a gunman who burst into the apartment of a couple whose wedding he had been filming and opened fire. The circumstances of the murder are still unclear and it is not know whether the journalist was the target or simply an innocent victim.  On 3 April, the body of Ibrahim Muhammed, a film editor with the commercial TV station African Independent Television, was found in a pool of blood in his apartment in Kaduna. According to his family, he had been followed home on two occasions by unidentified people. An investigation was opened on 4 April, but there have been no serious efforts to find those responsible.Photo: Newspapers’ readers in Kano, Northern Nigeria (AFP/Seyllou Diallo) Receive email alerts NigeriaAfrica Follow the news on Nigeria Nigerian news site deliberately blocked, expert report confirms NigeriaAfrica June 10, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information May 7, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Daily abuses suffered by Nigeria’s journalists RSF_en January 28, 2021 Find out more to go further Organisation February 8, 2021 Find out more Twitter blocked, journalism threatened in Nigeria News Nigerian investigative journalist forced to flee after massacre disclosures News News News Following World Press Freedom Day on May 3, Reporters Without Borders takes a look at the breaches of freedom of news and information in Nigeria during the first quarter of 2012, turning the spotlight on one of the most dangerous countries in Africa for journalists. For the first time, it has included the Islamist militia Boko Haram in its latest list of Predators of Freedom of Information, just published.The press freedom organization outlines all breaches of freedom of information recorded between 24 December and 24 March. It highlights the almost daily arrests and assault of journalists and the obstruction of access to, and distribution of, information, and describes the insidious atmosphere in which journalists have to carry out their work.During the period in question, Reporters Without Borders recorded: the murder of one journalist, the killing of another with no proof that it was linked to the victim’s work, nine assaults, seven arrests, three journalists threatened, four instances of seizure of equipment or deletion of files, three cases of access to information being cut off, three court cases against journalists and news organisations, the closure of a press centre and a media outlet’s premises vandalised.The report also covers disturbances in April when there were bomb attacks on the offices of two newspapers, in Abuja and Kaduna.Whether these abuses  – obstruction of information and control of the government’s image, or gratuitous violence and threats – were carried out by the government or private organizations using armed groups, they confirm the authorities’ desire to silence journalists who try to report on the instability now gripping the country.   Nigeria embodies a paradox. On the one hand, it is a country where freedom of news and information is effective so far as the pluralism and vitality of the media are concerned, and on the other, it has one of Africa’s worst records for infringements of press freedom and a worrying level of danger for journalists.   Murder, threats and violenceSince 14 March, when it became known that talks were taking place between Boko Haram and the government, the freelance journalist Ahmad Salkida has received several anonymous telephone threats. The reporter, who has covered the activities of Boko Haram for several years, was accused among other things of being a member of the Islamist group and of being the instigator of the talks. He was also told that he and the group “are not supposed to exist”. The next day, he was followed by a white Lagos-registered 4×4 for several hours in Abuja.In July last year he was forced to move away from the northern city of Maiduguri after receiving threats from people claiming to belong to Boko Haram. The threats followed the publication in the magazine Blueprint of an article he wrote on the Islamist group’s first suicide bomber.On 11 March, Boko Haram threatened to take action against three newspapers, National Accord, Vanguard and Tribune, in a tele-conference in Maiduguri, capital of Borno state. The group said the newspapers attributed statements to the group which were not made by its members and showed bias against it in their reports. It said they portrayed the group in a negative light while praising government forces.On 9 March, Boko Haram had threatened to “take care of” any journalist that misrepresented its views in an article. The Nigerian Tribune and Vanguard Newspapers were among those mentioned specifically by the group’s spokesman, Abul Qaqa.On 13 February, six journalists from the New Nigerian, Blueprint, Aminiya, Voice of Nigeria, Hausa Service and the Nigerian Standard, and a Nigerian Television Authority cameraman were attacked by a dozen unidentified assailants in Katami village in the Silame local government area of Sokoto State, where they were covering the election campaign of the All Nigeria Peoples Party’s candidate for the state governorship, Alhaji Yusha’u Ahmed. The bus in which they were travelling was attacked by men armed with machetes, knives, cutlasses and sticks.On 7 February, Akinola Ariyo, a photojournalist for the New Nigerian, was threatened by an officer who aimed his weapon at him and ordered him to leave while he was accompanying a group of people trying to negotiate the reopening of the press centre at Murtala Mohammed airport in Lagos, closed by the airport authorities in early February.On 1 February, three security guards assaulted Hassan Adebayo, marketing executive with the Port Harcourt newspaper Daily Trust and Sani Musa, the driver of the company’s distribution vehicle, as the pair were delivering copies of that day’s edition to vendors in the area.  The attackers, in a white Toyota Hilux with the registration number RV 96 AO1, first attacked the driver, who managed to escape, then vandalised the vehicle, smashing its side mirrors.  On 20 January, Enenche Godwin Akogwu, 31, the Kano correspondent of Channels TV, was shot dead while trying to cover Boko Haram suicide bombings, which killed at least 185 people earlier that day.  The journalist was interviewing victims outside the Farm central police station, which was a target of one of the attacks, when an unidentified gunman fired several shots at him.The body of radio reporter Nansok Silas, who worked for Highland FM, was found on 19 January in a stream under a bridge on the Zaramagada-Rayfield road, 200 metres from a military checkpoint, in Jos, northeast of Abuja. Nothing of value was taken from him and colleagues suspect  he was the victim of a targeted murder, but the cause of death and possible motive are still unknown.Originally from the Langtang North area in Plateau state, he had worked for Highland FM for three years and hosted a programme called “Highland Profile”. He had not received any threats. Reporters Without Borders has called on the authorities to carry out a thorough investigation and to do their utmost to shed light on his death, and to consider the possibility that it was linked to his work.On 3 January, the Kano office of the Daily Trust was invaded by vandals who tried to smash up the premises and assault staff.  Only one person involved in the failed attempt was arrested. He was charged with criminal conspiracy, assault, criminal trespass and mischief by fire. Obstructing access to information and controlling the state’s imageThere was glaring evidence during the first quarter of 2012 of the Nigerian authorities’ desire to control the country’s image and monitor what the media publish or broadcast.  The government demonstrated its resolve to hide the real extent of the population’s demonstrations of dissatisfaction, as well as the threat presented by Boko Haram. It seems as if the obstruction of access to information, seizures of newspaper print runs and equipment, as well as threats and lawsuits against journalists are aimed at allowing the government to play down its own weakness and the difficulties faced by the country, On 13 March, police and troops manhandled several journalists covering a visit to Ibadan, the capital of Oyo State, by the first lady, Patience Jonathan. Dare Fasuba, of The Vanguard, Akinwale Aboluade of The Punch, Gbenro Adesina of The News/PM NEWS, and Sola Adeyemo of Compass Newspapers were prevented from entering Lekan Salami Stadium, while others such as Bisi Oladele of The Nation were beaten when they tried to exercise their right to cover the event.A few days earlier, Jude Obiemenyego, a journalist with the newspaper Zion Nationale, was arrested by an officer of the State Security Service, for having exposed a case of corruption involving the ex-wife of the former government of Delta State.  He was arrested in the woman’s office and threatened with a gun before being taken to police headquarters where he was held for several days. Since his release, he has received telephone death threats from unidentified callers.On 7 March, an unidentified journalist was assaulted by police officers deployed to break up protests by youths at the Stubb Creek oilfield in the southern state of Akwa Ibom. The journalist fled to escape further violence. On 23 February, Misbahu Bashir, a reporter for the Daily Trust, was refused access to the headquarters of the Aguryi Ironsi brigade in Abuja and was forced to stay in his car for three hours by soldiers outside the building. The journalist was seeking information about the arrest by brigade troops of 99 passengers travelling in a truck that had been stopped on the Kaduna-Abuja highway.He said he was detained after asking to see the brigade commander instead of the public relations officer, a captain, with whom he had originally requested a meeting.The reporter was allowed to leave after he was made to write down his name, address and vehicle registration number.    On 18 February, Iyatse Joshua, of the radio station City FM, was arrested by Lagos police while he was covering a procession organized by human rights activists and organizations in remembrance of those killed by security forces a during the week-long nationwide strike and mass protest against the abolition in January of fuel subsidies. He and a number of activists were taken to the offices of the Special Anti-Robbery Squad. All were released several hours later on the orders of the chief of police. On 14 February, Suleiman Isah, a reporter with the Daily Champion, was barred from entering the Niger State government headquarters by members of the State Security Service, despite having appropriate accreditation. The security officers threatened him before he was allowed to leave the premises.Earlier, a Voice of America reporter was manhandled by security men in similar circumstances outside the Justice Idris Legbo Conference Centre, a few metres from the government building. On 13 February, journalists from The Nation, ThisDay, The Punch, The Guardian and Nigerian Tribune were forced to leave by soldiers posted at the entrance to a hospital next door to the government headquarters in the northern city of Kaduna. They were reporting on an attack by some of the governor’s guards on an information ministry official, whom they mistook for a member of Boko Haram. On 9 February, Isa Sa’idu, the Kaduna bureau chief of the Daily Trust, was threatened by Lieutenant-Colonel Abubakar Edun, spokesman of the army’s First Mechanised Division,  for having reported that soldiers had manhandled journalists trying to cover the bombing of a division barracks in Kaduna on 7 February. His equipment was seized. On the same day at the same location, Umar Uthman a cameraman with the private station African Independent Television and a colleague from government-run Katuna State Television both had their cameras confiscated.On 7 February, agents of the State Security Service raided the offices of the Nigerian Television Authority in Abuja in search of video recordings that showed members of Boko Haram nominated to take part in talks with the government. The cassettes were taken away by the agents, who said they were acting on government orders.On 5 February, the French journalist Jérémie Drieu, a reporter for the channel TF1, and a local colleague Ahmad Salkida, were arrested by soldiers in the city of Jos in Plateau State. They were forced to show all the material they had filmed before being forced to pack and leave the state at nightfall. They were apprehended when it emerged that a documentary on which they were working would be critical of the government.On 4 February, the press centre at Murtala Mohammed International Airport in Lagos, opened 30 years ago, was closed by the Nigerian authorities on the orders of the head of the protocol department attached to the airport’s presidential wing, Alofabi Oduniyi. He was reported to have accused journalists accredited to the centre of writing articles that were negative and prejudicial to the interests of the president. More than 60 journalists have been prevented from recovering their equipment locked inside the centre. Martins Ayola, general director of the station Adaba FM, which broadcasts in Ondo State, said there was a price on the head of some of its senior staff for broadcasting critical programmes and they were being hunted by contract killers. One of the station’s programmes, ‘Oja-Oro’, was ordered off air by the Nigeria Broadcasting Corporation for allegedly trying to turn listeners against the governor, Olusegun Mimiko.On 1 February, Kayode Akinmade, the commissioner for information and strategy, launched a petition against the programme that succeeded ‘Oja-Oro’, entitled “Ela Oro”, alleging it was broadcasting negative perceptions of the government. Also on 1 February, Goke Famadewa, a journalist for The Punch newspaper, was manhandled by police attached to the Lagos office of Shell Nigeria. The journalist, who was reporting on a dispute inside the company, was beaten up for taking photographs of the premises. The police officers deleted all his photos before releasing him after two hours.     On 25 January, newspaper vendors Okwudili Nnadi, Tochukwu Onuigbo, Ugwu Stephen and Martha Agbedo – who had her five-month-old baby with her – were arrested by state police in Nsukka, in Enugu state. All copies of newspapers in their possession were seized based on the argument that they stirred up popular unrest because they contained photos of the victims of Boko Haram attacks. They were released after several hours but they were unable to recover the confiscated copies.Again on 25 January, Stanley Mijah, a journalist for The Scope published in Adamawa State, was indicted by a court in Yola for having in his possession sensitive articles which, if published, might disturb public order.Abdullahi Adamu Kanoma, a journalist with Zamfara State Radio, was charged with   criminal conspiracy, inciting public disturbance, illegal assembly and mischief by fire. He was arrested while on his way to the police headquarters to interview the commissioner after the fuel price protests of recent months. He was approached by police officers and told his name was a list of people to be arrested for taking part in the marches. His trial began on 6 February before the Zamfara State Sharia court.Problems persist in April, two more suspicious deathslast_img read more

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Why Fury split with trainer Ben Davison ahead of Wilder rematch

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first_imgTHERE would be no lucrative rematch with WBC champion Deontay Wilder for Tyson Fury were it not for Ben Davison. There may not even have been an initial bout between the two giants with claims to the heavyweight throne were it not for Davison.Davison revealed on social media on Sunday that he’d split from Fury and would no longer train the lineal heavyweight champion, who fights Wilder in a rematch of their memorable 2018 bout on February 22 in Las Vegas. On Monday, Fury announced that SugarHill Steward, the nephew of the late Hall of Fame trainer Emanuel Steward, would be in his corner for Wilder.Fury was more than 400 pounds and not far away from a suicide attempt when he’d hooked up with Davison. With Davison’s guidance, he dropped 140 pounds, fought Wilder to a controversial draw and signed a big-dollar co-promotional agreement with Top Rank to fight in the U.S.Davison was far more than a trainer; and actually working on strategy and teaching Fury technique were the least of his contributions. He is the guy who, quite literally, brought Fury back to life.He was there as much for the way he could help Fury with his mental health problems as he was for his boxing knowledge. Davison is 27 and doesn’t have the years of experience that someone like Freddie Roach brings to the corner. He is a perfectly competent trainer, but there are hundreds, if not thousands, of perfectly competent trainers.Davison was the Fury whisperer, a guy who was there for Fury during the many rough patches in his life. Fury has been public with his mental health demons, and Davison is one of the key figures who helped him through that.It’s going to be something Fury has to fight all of his life, but he’s in a far better place now than he was in those dark days after he’d beaten Wladimir Klitschko in 2015 to become unified champion and began to think of taking his own life.He speaks publicly about his issues in a bid to help others face their problems. People are often reluctant to admit they have problems and need help, and Fury has tried to remove the stigma that surrounds them. One isn’t “nuts” simply because he/she suffers from depression or some other form of mental illness.Davison was there to support Fury and be an understanding voice and a watchful eye. He was the perfect trainer at the perfect spot in Fury’s life.But as Fury has improved in that regard, he’s not in need of as much help as he was, and he’ll have former middleweight champion Andy Lee in his camp to serve that role.Obviously it’s not gonna stop until there’s an answer. Tyson and myself had to both make decisions for our careers, which resulted in our working relationship coming to an end, However, we remain friends and he will smash the dosser!!Fury trained at the Kronk Gym in Detroit when Emanuel Steward was alive and got to know SugarHill there. With his fight with Wilder essentially determining who is the world’s No.1 heavyweight, it’s incumbent upon Fury to put together the best team possible.He would have liked to have had Davison remain on as a No. 2, but Davison wasn’t interested in that. Davison is training Billy Joe Saunders and can now commit all of his attention to Saunders, who is in the running to be Canelo Alvarez’s next opponent.Fury out-boxed Wilder when they met on December 1, 2018, in Los Angeles in a fight that ended as a split draw. One judge favoured Fury, another had Wilder and the third had it even. Wilder’s knockdowns in the ninth and 12th rounds were what got him the points to earn the draw.If Fury stays off the deck in the rematch, he’s almost certain to win by a wide margin. Fury is by far the better pure boxer and can win the fight by keeping a jab in Wilder’s face and keeping him at a distance where he can’t close the gap and land his powerful right.Wilder is arguably the hardest puncher in boxing history, and is riding a wave of confidence heading into the rematch. He figures to be more dangerous in February than he was in 2018, so Fury needs to be comfortable that he’s doing all he can to be prepared to defuse those bombs headed in his direction.If he feels Steward gives him the best chance to do that rather than Davison, then he needs Steward in his corner. The decision has nothing to do with Davison’s ability to train and all to do with Fury’s comfort.Davison will go down in boxing lore for what he did with Fury, even if they never work together again. Bringing Fury back from the brink of death to within a single punch of the WBC belt is a monstrous achievement that won’t ever be forgotten.He was that man for that time. SugarHill Steward is the man for the present.Fury made the move that made the most sense for where he stands in his career at this stage, and no one should have a complaint or a second-guess about what he’s done. (Yahoo Sport)last_img read more

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FB : Cohen: Win over perennial power USC would cement SU’s status as elite Big East team

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first_img Published on September 14, 2011 at 12:00 pm Contact Michael: [email protected] | @Michael_Cohen13 Comments Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Doug Marrone knows the feeling. It’s that supreme level of confidence that more than crosses into cockiness every time you step on the field.You know you’re going to win because, well, you’re not in the same class as the other team.‘When I was at Tennessee, we played some teams, and we knew we were going to win,’ Marrone said. ‘I don’t know if that’s arrogance or what. But we had some unbelievable players that are still playing in the NFL today. My point is, we’re not there.’In other words, one team polishes its Pinstripe Bowl trophy — the only bowl win for the program since 2001 — and the other needs a whole crew to spit-shine the hardware from two national championships and four Rose Bowl titles in that same time period.Those two programs are, of course, Syracuse and Southern California. And that’s exactly why a win for the Orange on Saturday would elevate SU to the top tier of the Big East. Both are storied programs rich in tradition and history, but the Trojans were the best team in college football during the last decade, regardless of the wins they had to vacate. Syracuse was not.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSaturday is a chance to turn a corner for the SU program. It’s more than a singular nonconference game in the third week of the season. It’s a checkpoint for Marrone as he continues to ‘change the culture,’ as former quarterback Greg Paulus put it.‘This would be one of those career games,’ Syracuse linebacker Dan Vaughan said. ‘One of those games that you think about 20 years from now you’re like, ‘Wow, I played in that game.’ We’re hoping to go out there and make it special.’A win would be special because of how many miles apart SU and Southern California have been on the college football spectrum since the turn of the century. It’s more than the 2,681 miles separating Los Angeles from the city of Syracuse.USC had seven seasons where it lost two or fewer games. The Orange had two seasons in which it won two or fewer games.The Trojans had Matt Leinart, Reggie Bush and Steve Smith. Syracuse had Perry Patterson, Damien Rhodes and Rice Moss.‘We’re talking about USC, which is arguably, since 2003, maybe the best program in college football, and they’re still an excellent program,’ Marrone said. ‘I don’t think anything can get you prepared to play such a storied program such as USC.’Yet it’s the same grandeur, splendor and dominance exhibited by Southern California that makes Saturday’s game so intriguing for Syracuse. It pulls to the forefront questions like: ‘What if SU pulls the upset?’ and ‘What would that mean for the program?’It would be the biggest win for Orange since 2002, when a team that finished 4-8 knocked off then-No. 8 Virginia Tech 50-42 in triple overtime in the Carrier Dome.It would mean that Marrone is miles ahead of schedule on his plan to restore Syracuse to its glory-day form.Beat Southern California on the road to start the season 3-0 in just his third year at the helm? That’s a signature win that doesn’t deserve to be penned with the same ink as his so-called signature win against then-No. 20 West Virginia last year.‘For this year’s team to get to 3-0 with some quality wins against an ACC team and a Pac-12 team — a team that’s arguably one of the most dominant teams of the last decade — I think that would make a statement to the country,’ Paulus said.Let’s take that statement and apply it to the Big East.While Syracuse struggled with Rhode Island last week, Louisville lost to Florida International, Pittsburgh snuck by Maine and Tennessee clobbered Cincinnati.If SU finds a way to stun the Trojans and win this game, the Orange has to be looked at as the best team in the conference.So that’s why Saturday is huge for the culture of Syracuse football. Marrone and his staff have certainly improved the team by leaps and bounds, but a win over Southern California on the road would be a landmark victory.It means the culture has officially changed.Said Vaughan: ‘I’ve gone through in my head all week what it’s going to be like if we win, and I really can’t put it into words.’Michael Cohen is the sports editor at The Daily Orange, where his column appears occasionally. He can be reached at [email protected] or on Twitter at @Michael_Cohen13. last_img read more

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