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Christian Aid Week 2017 focuses on refugee crisis

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first_img Christian Aid Week, the charity’s annual major fundraising campaign, focused again this year on the refugee crisis, the largest since the Second World War.Working with GOOD Agency, the charity highlighted its work with refugees in Greece and their ongoing need for support.In particular the agency supported Christian Aid improve its digital fundraising, community event recruitment, inserts and direct marketing.Longest running fundraising event Christian Aid Week is the UK’s longest running fundraising event. It involves over 20,000 churches whose congregations deliver 8 million donation elements across the UK.The week was established in 1945 to generate support for refugees in the wake of the Second World War. This year’s campaign not surprisingly played on the charity’s long heritage and continued commitment to helping refugees.This year it began on 15 May.Big BrekkieNew this year for the campaign week is the Big Brekkie, an effort to attract support from the growing numbers of younger, urban, more dynamic church congregations with no traditional connection to Christian Aid.It is a social and fun community fundraising product designed to sit alongside the continued envelope collection in Christian Aid Week.Having produced the creative guidelines and participant pack for Big Brekkie last year, this year GOOD worked with Christian Aid on digital recruitment ads across Spotify, social channels, display and Christian social influencers.Pete Grant, Lead Planner at GOOD Agency, explained: “Christian Aid have responded to the biggest refugee crisis in our memory by being braver than ever. They bought our bravest concepts, invested boldly in new channels and product innovation. It’s been a pleasure working together and we have no doubt their bravery will be rewarded with a new generation of Christian aid supporters and a reinvigorated network of volunteers.”GOOD Agency also brought to life the story of a refugee mother, Nejebar, stranded with her children in Greece having fled bullets and bombs in Afghanistan.   Advertisement Early resultsThe campaign’s inserts and warm direct mail letters landed in the week beginning 17th May. Timed to arrive alongside envelope collections, they featured a line in Farsi asking “will you help us break bread together?”They focused on the story of a refugee mother, Nejebar, stranded with her children in Greece having fled fighting in Afghanistan.After two weeks online donations surpassed expectations. GOOD Agency expected 791 donations through digital advertising, but in fact secured 3,200 donations worth a total of more than £180,000. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis15 About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 11 July 2017 | Newscenter_img  237 total views,  1 views today Christian Aid Week 2017 focuses on refugee crisis Tagged with: Christian Aid Research / statistics The Good Agency  238 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis15last_img read more

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Students occupy, strike against white supremacy at Syracuse University

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first_imgFeb. 24 — With Black students leading, the #NotAgainSU coalition has occupied Syracuse University’s admissions building since Feb. 17.Over 100 supporters gather outside Syracuse University admissions building in solidarity with Black student-led occupation Feb. 18. [Credit: WRVO]They are protesting Chancellor Kent Syverud’s inaction in dealing with anti-Black, anti-Asian, anti-Indigenous, anti-Semitic and homophobic incidents.At least 29 such physical assaults, verbal threats — including death threats — and graffiti on and near campus have occurred since Nov. 7, the latest on Feb. 21. (See timeline at tinyurl.com/s5es5w6/.)#NotAgainSU launched protests in November, when multiple instances of racist graffiti and violent vandalism first appeared in dormitories and classroom buildings. After the lack of any response from the administration, the coalition occupied the Barnes Center at The Arch for eight days. Finally, a crowd of 1,000 people marched on Syverud’s house, demanding his resignation.After a standoff, the chancellor agreed to meet coalition demands that his administration act to end the attacks and make systemic changes to fight discrimination. But racist incidents have continued unabated, while administration actions have been so slow as to be only “window-dressing.”Students occupy to get actionThe spring semester began with a homophobic physical assault and more racist graffiti. After an unproductive appeal to the SU Board of Trustees, #NotAgainSU occupied Crouse-Hinds Hall, the admissions building, on Feb. 17.The coalition’s renewed list of demands includes punishment, up to expulsion, for those promoting or initiating hate crimes; mandatory diversity training for incoming faculty and administrators; curriculum reform on diversity; changed housing procedures to minimize impact of prejudice; more hiring of staff of “marginalized identities,” including resident advisors and counselors; and the designation and funding of a separate Multicultural Center.” (Detailed demands at tinyurl.com/tgv3aw)On Feb. 18, Syverud and his administration immediately took an aggressively hard line against the protest and issued suspensions of 30 student occupiers. Armed university guards turned back food, medical supplies and any supporters who came to offer assistance to the students.The racist bias of the administration was quickly unmasked when four suspended students came forward to prove they had never been present in the Crouse-Hinds occupation. All four women were Black students.On Feb. 19, #NotAgainSU issued a statement: “The administration has not appropriately addressed the 25+ hate crimes that have occurred … and they have not addressed student protesters in any way that is reflective of a commitment to equal safety and support.”Student workers strike in solidarityImmediately after the SU administration imposed the suspensions, 100 graduate students of color and international students announced a labor strike in solidarity with the occupiers. (tinyurl.com/wan3uwc)They were quickly joined by other grad student workers also calling for a strike action and pledging to withhold their labor from the university. Over 150 had signed the separate solidarity strike statement by the evening of Feb. 19. (tinyurl.com/qpnohk7)In addition to supporting the demands of the occupiers, the statement declared the strike would continue until suspensions of all #NotAgainSU organizers and student activists were lifted and their records cleared.With the power of student-worker solidarity accelerating, an immediate victory was won. Chancellor Syverud was forced to lift all suspensions on the occupiers by the afternoon of Feb. 19. He did not, however, address any of the student demands.A group of SU professors issued a statement denouncing the administration’s lockdown and isolation of protesting students; denial of food, medical supplies and visitors; imposition of suspensions; use of armed guards and threats of arrest. The statement said in closing: “The use of war crime tactics against our students must be renounced.” (Daily Orange, Feb. 24)Student workers on strike had these words of fighting wisdom to offer: “A number of BIPOC [Black, Indigenous and People of Color] and international graduate students have received threats of retaliation from their respective departments — including threats of termination and revocation of funding. To you all, we say the only protection for us lies in our collective numbers. … Our strike has already seen a win with the suspensions being lifted. This speaks to our collective power. But wins are never a time to concede; wins are always times to sustain pressure.” (“Labor Strike” statement, tinyurl.com/wan3uwc)FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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