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Archives for: January 26, 2021

Study classifies depression risk factor as contagious

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first_imgThings that are contagious: laughter, yawning, sneezing, the common cold. And now somewhere on that list you’ll find cognitive vulnerability. A recent study by Notre Dame psychology professor Gerald Haeffel, published in the journal Clinical Psychological Science, found that a risk factor for depression known as ‘cognitive vulnerability’ can be passed from one individual to another. Haeffel said cognitive vulnerability is essentially a style of thinking about events and personal reflection, not to be confused with the mood of depression itself. Cognitive vulnerability can be a powerful predictor of future depressive episodes, he said. “To give an example, say two people both fail a test here. The college student who is at risk for depression will think, ‘This means I’m stupid, or worthless, I’m never going to get into grad school now,’ and when they’re sad, they just focus on this,” Haeffel said. “They’re stuck on ‘I feel so sad, why do I feel so miserable, what’s wrong with me?’ That’s the person who’s at risk for depression.” Haeffel said.   “Whereas another student who gets the same failing grade might think ‘I didn’t work hard enough, I’ll work harder on the next one. I’ll catch up, I’ll be fine, I’ll still get into grad school,’” he said.  “And when they feel sad, they go and play basketball or go play a sport or do whatever. That person’s not at risk for depression.” Haeffel said conventional wisdom in the psychology field has held that cognitive vulnerability in individuals remains relatively stable throughout life, past adolescence. “We thought that there were going to be times when it might change. These would be times during major life transitions, times when you go into a new social environment where you’re surrounded by new people who have all new ways of thinking,” Haeffel said. “We thought that [in these times] it might rub off and actually be contagious.” To investigate this hypothesis, Haeffel said he and Jennifer Hames, a 2009 graduate of Notre Dame, conducted a study on 103 pairs of randomly assigned freshman roommates at the University. Haeffel surveyed the students on the two aspects of cognitive vulnerability – event interpretation and self-reflection – when the freshmen first arrived, three months later, and at the end of the academic year, six months later. Haeffel found that those who had a roommate with a negative way of thinking about the world caught some of that style and became more negative in their own thinking. At the final survey, those who had their cognitive vulnerability adversely influenced were at a significantly greater risk for depression. “This is the first study to show that these can change more easily than you thought,” Haeffel said. “In three months, we saw changes in vulnerability that then actually meant something for future depressive symptoms.” Haeffel emphasized that these findings on the relative malleability of cognitive vulnerability have implications in treatment of depression. He said those suffering from the disorder could benefit greatly from a treatment such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, which focuses on how individuals think about events and themselves. “If people are struggling with depression, we always hear on the news that the best treatments are medication,” Haeffel said. “But this therapy is as effective as medication and it’s time-limited so you don’t have to take it your whole life. It also has a relapse-prevention effect, unlike medication. “You learn the skills and it keeps you safe from depression in the future, which tends to be highly recurrent.” Contact Henry Gens at [email protected]last_img read more

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SMC students attend People’s Climate March in NYC

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first_imgFive Saint Mary’s students and one professor boarded the Amtrak shortly after midnight on Friday to join more than 300,000 people in New York City for the People’s Climate March. After a 20-hour train ride, the women met up with five more Saint Mary’s students who traveled by car or by plane to attend Climate Convergence workshops hosted throughout Manhattan.Photo courtesy of Eleanor Jones “This is the biggest climate march in the history of climate marches,” senior Katelyn Durning said.Sonalini Sapra, assistant professor of political science and gender and women studies, organized the Saint Mary’s students’ involvement in the historical demonstration.“When I heard about the march I said, ‘I’m definitely going,’ and I said I would love to bring some students with me,” Sapra said.Sapra said she emailed environmental studies students, global studies majors and some students she thought would have a general interest in attending the Climate March. After an encouraging response from the initial recipients, Sapra succeeded in requesting funds through the Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership (CWIL).Mikhala Kaseweter, a sophomore and Saint Mary’s first environmental science major, said she was elated to be included as one of the seven students whose travel expenses CWIL covered.“I was glad to partake in the biggest public display of the values in which I believe,” Kaseweter said.Kaseweter, who read Rachel Carson’s ‘Silent Spring’ — a book exploring the detrimental effects of pesticide on the environment — when she was in fifth grade, said she was impressed with people’s dedication to climate justice.“My favorite part was probably seeing the passion of all the other people at the rally because I thought I was into it, and then I got there and realized that there are actually way cooler people out there who have devoted their whole lives to [the cause],” Kaseweter said.Eleanor Jones, a junior global studies major, said she was most impressed to see these advocates for climate change demonstrate their passion together.“My favorite part was the moment of silence that everybody gave at the same time and then hearing the roar of people from the very back sweep across the whole audience of the march,” Jones said. “It really showed the unity of the people. They were unified in their silence and then they were also unified in their celebration of the event.”Sapra said about a minute of silence was offered for the victims of climate change and shortly thereafter, the crowd used another minute to shout support for effective action on this issue.Jones said the College’s location in Indiana enhanced the significance of having representatives contribute to the march.“I think that in particular people in the Midwest need to show their support for causes like this that mainly draw attention to either coast,” she said.Kasewater said her attendance and that of her Saint Mary’s peers at the People’s Climate March coincided with the College’s move towards a more eco-friendly campus.“I think it’s a clear demonstration of the focus on sustainability that the sisters of the Holy Cross have incorporated into their mission,” she said.“Catholic colleges, particularly colleges like Saint Mary’s, have a strong social justice component to their mission,” Sapra said. “I think it’s really important that students at the College understand what a big issue this is. This is the big issue of your generation.“I think environmental issues, issues around climate justice, get talked about in very muted ways on our campus. I think in putting this group together, my thinking was … this is a great way for you guys to get connected with other groups working nationally and internationally and it sounds like [the students] did a lot of that interacting with other youth, people from other organizations.”The People’s Climate March organizers originally estimated 100,000 participants would attend the march; 400,000 people shattered that expectation by showing up Sunday, according to the March’s website. There were numerous reports of Leonardo DiCaprio, Ban Ki-moon, Jane Goodall, Al Gore and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio being in attendance.Sapra said this issue will most directly affect the lives of Generation X and onward but noted that activists of all ages have gotten involved.“I liked the sign that was right behind us when we assembled — ‘Women Elders Concerned about Climate Change’ — and the whole ‘gray-to-green,’ ‘Grandmas for climate change,’ ‘Grandmas for climate justice,’” she said. “I think it was great to see such a cross-sectional range of people — plenty of young people, but plenty of people in their seventies and eighties as well, and it’s pretty interesting because they were marching for their grandkids and their great grandkids. They want to leave the planet a better place, and I thought that was very inspiring.“There are so many other moments you know people being in solidarity with each other, is a really powerful thing to see.”Ellyn Milan, a junior global studies said she chose to go the march to learn more about the cause. She said she connected with other groups and students who participated in the Climate Convergence and the March itself.“I’ve always been aware of the different environmental issues, but I’ve ever looked in depth at what is out there and what can be done about it the different support groups that fight for different causes,” Milan said. “… I really liked the different speakers we heard on Saturday because there were a lot of things that I could agree with and relate with and different issues that I wasn’t aware of now want to investigate further and try to do my part.“… The march itself was just incredible. Seeing all the people come out from New York, from around the country, around the world — each fighting for their own cause but at the same time, united in purpose.”Sapra said she hopes the students who traveled to New York will be inspired enough not only to rethink their own commitments to sustainability, but also to spread that awareness to their classmates.“My hope is also that [the students] come back to campus and … do something to raise issues about sustainability, climate justice, environmental justice at Saint Mary’s because I think our campus has a long way to go in meeting sustainability,” Sapra said. “That’s also seeded in the community of South Bend — it has a long way to go.”“I think in our campus, it’s only when students ask for things that things get done and so if students are not pushing for this then the Saint Mary’s administration doesn’t take it seriously,” Sapra said.Tags: Al Gore, Ban Ki-moon, Bill de Blasio, Climate change, Climate Convergence, Climate Justice, Jane Goodall, Leonardo DiCaprio, Manhattan, New York City, PCM, People’s Climate March, People’s Climate March 2014, sustainabilitylast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s concludes supply drive for Ebola patients

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first_imgSaint Mary’s assistant professor of nursing Juliana Mwose, the Sisters of Nefertiti and Belles for Africa concluded their supply drive for the Ebola outbreak Wednesday. They placed bins in Spes Unica Hall to collect supplies to send to African countries that would help prevent the spread of the virus, including hand sanitizers, thermometers, gloves, surface wipes and masks.Associate professor of nursing Ella Harmeyer said she encourages people to stay calm and approach the Ebola virus in a sensible manner.“Ebola has been around for over 30 years,” she said. “Currently the numbers in western African, in a small number of countries, have risen significantly. We should not ignore it, but we should also not become hysterical.”She said it is important to donate items because many affected countries have populations who live in rural areas without access to the resources they need. Due to poor healthcare, any illnesses impoverished people in Africa face have the potential to be life-threatening, Harmeyer said.“Already, of the seven cases treated in the US, only one person has died,” she said. “That is a much lower level of mortality than the disease has in western Africa.”She said influenza will be more of a problem for Americans over the next few months or so.“Real influenza, not the common cold which is sometimes referred to as ‘the flu,’ will cause death in a number of people over the next four months,” she said. “But we ‘know’ the flu, and therefore we don’t panic.”She said Ebola transmission is not airborne and requires contact with body fluids.“Sitting next to someone on a plane is not going to transmit this virus,” she said.Harmeyer said there are only three countries in Africa that are experiencing this epidemic, not the whole continent of 58 countries.“We tend to fear those things that are new and different,” she said. “We do need to make sensible decisions based on the facts.”Assistant professor of nursing Juliana Mwose said although Ebola is not a new disease, this happens to be the largest and most complex Ebola outbreak since 1976 when it was first discovered.“This time around, Ebola has claimed more lives and spread across land boarders and abroad,” Mwose said. “I think the best way to deal with this disease right now is to try and contain it and restrict its spread while the scientific world figures out a vaccine.“We have eradicated many other serious diseases, and I think this is not an exception. But in the meantime, we need to do all we can to get education about the disease and keep it contained. That is why I think the simple method of using hygiene will go along way into fighting the disease.”She said as a country, it is important for Americans to keep up with news to know what is happening, and also to get the truth about the disease and educate families and communities on how to prevent the spread of the virus.As a college community, Mwose said the most important contribution students and faculty can have on helping the Ebola crisis is donating basic yet necessary supplies needed to fight the disease.Sophomore Mairead Zigulich said in the Saint Mary’s community, it may not seem like students are making a major impact just by donating supplies because Ebola is such a huge problem, but every little bit counts.“If everyone gave just a little, that has the power to make a major difference,” she said.Students interested in donating money or supplies can contact Diane Fox at [email protected]: Belles for Africa, Ebola, Ella Harmeyer, juliana mwose, Sisters of Nefertitilast_img read more

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Notre Dame community remembers Karabo Moleah

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first_imgKarabo Moleah had a way of making others feel special, third-year law student Caroline Shoemaker said.“You didn’t have to try to fit this prestigious law school mold with Karabo,” she said. “He celebrated all of our differences. He loved what made us different, and he made us love our differences too.“I was unapologetically me when I was with him. We were all unapologetically ourselves when we were with Karabo.”Mosupatsela Karabo V. Moleah, 26, died March 31 in Philadelphia. Moleah was a third-year law student participating in Notre Dame Law School’s Washington program this semester.Moleah was born in Delaware, but moved to South Africa — his parents’ homeland — when he was five years old. At age 10, Moleah’s family moved to Austria, where his father was appointed South Africa’s ambassador. Moleah later returned to South Africa to attend boarding school and then earned his undergraduate degree in criminal justice at Temple University.“Karabo, I am confident to say, was the most interesting person in all of Notre Dame,” third-year law student Eddy Panchernikov said at a reception following a memorial Mass held in Moleah’s honor last Tuesday.“At this point, I am not even sure I have his full story right — and that’s his fault. He would never talk about himself, that was just who he was,” Panchernikov said. “When you were with him it was always about you, he wanted to know you, about your background, why you thought the way you thought, why you were saying the things you were saying.”Mack Watson, a third-year law student and friend of Moleah’s, said Moleah was a gifted speaker and communicator, who loved to challenge others’ positions and be challenged himself.“He spoke in a manner that resembled poetic verse, weaving legal concepts together with black colloquialisms and frequent analogies to structure not an argument — but a truism — on issues such as history, race, sex, violence, men, women, politics and religion. He lacked any sort of fear of the so-called offensive but rather embraced honesty fully, regardless of social stigma or consequences.”Bruce Huber, associate professor of law, said Moleah helped create a stimulating academic environment, in and out of the classroom.“I’m also sure that as I got to know him, I gained the privilege of speaking with a thoughtful, motivated, curious man with a remarkable background and unique outlook on life,” he said.Moleah’s intellect surfaced in every aspect of his life, Panchernikov said.“Karabo’s every saying, every quick quip, was a philosopher’s poem, bursting with significance and consequence, knowable only to him and revealable only at his pleasure,” he said. “Karabo’s intellect however, was matched by his humor and wit. Many times taking one of our jokes an elevating it far beyond anything we intended in terms of humor.”Moleah took fashion seriously and always looked “swaggy,” third-year law student Colin McArthur said, which helped showcase “his individuality and magnetism — his sheer confidence, intensity and completely unique approach to everything.”“Karabo was always memorable. Always.” McArthur said.Moleah’s laugh was also memorable and captivating, third-year law student Courtney Laidlaw said.“He made you feel like a million dollars,” he said. “You’d say something and he would laugh — and it was a genuine laugh. He was a pleasure to be around, always.”Nell Newton, Joseph A. Matson Dean and professor of law, said Moleah left an indelible mark on his classmates, friends and faculty during his time at Notre Dame.“He commanded attention in any space or classroom because of his confident demeanor, yet unlike many who stand out in a crowd, his focus was always on others,” she said. “He challenged the status quo in a way that made you listen, whether you were a classmate or the dean of the law school.”Jimmy Gurulé, a professor of law who taught Moleah’s first-year criminal law class, said he thinks Moleah would have made a great impact on the justice system.“He would have brought a unique perspective and diverse life experiences to the practice of criminal law,” he said. “His guiding light would have been the pursuit of justice. In the process, he would have touched and uplifted the lives of everyone with whom he came into contact, just the way he did at Notre Dame.”Newton said Moleah’s fellow students have said after talking to him, they often felt “lighter and better about themselves and their place in the world.”“He had an aura of friendly energy — like a gravitational field pulling others into his orbit,” Watson said.Tags: Karabo Moleah, Law studentlast_img read more

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Invisible Illness Awareness Day panel debunks ailment stereotypes

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first_imgA group of Notre Dame students officially known as “the Invisilillies” conducted a panel recognizing the University’s first “Invisible Illness Awareness Day.”The panelists described how these ailments affect their daily lives and debunked the myths associated with the appearance of being sick.Senior Francie Fitzgerald was diagnosed with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) — an autoimmune disease that causes her body’s immune system to attack healthy cells — as a sophomore in high school. One of the disease’s many symptoms is compromised blood and oxygen flow to her brain and extremities.Because of this problem, Fitzgerald said, “many POTS patients pass out each time they speak,” and the array of challenges Fitzgerald’s condition has caused led to her getting a service dog named Paddy in her sophomore year at Notre Dame to assist her in her daily life.Each panelist acknowledged a myth or stereotype of invisible illness they proved wrong. One thing common misconception Fitzgerald cited is that because she looks healthy, her “dog must be a comfort animal or psychiatric service dog.” Those kinds of service dogs play important roles too, Fitzgerald said, but this comment causes people to overlook her illness because it is not visible.Senior Lauren Janek has several invisible illnesses, including Crohn’s disease and fibromyalgia. For her and the other 12 Invisilillies, she said, hearing the statement “but you don’t look or act sick” has been frustrating.“What are sick people supposed to look like?” Janek said. “Most of the time when I’m not feeling well, it’s behind closed doors. So yes, we look perfectly fine when you see us in class or see us out, which is really confusing. This disease isn’t our defining characteristic, but it would be nice for people to know.”Diagnosed during the summer before her freshman year at Notre Dame, sophomore Rose Ashley has chronic fatigue syndrome and a rare disease called IGA Vasculitis, which causes bleeding beneath the skin as the body attacks small blood vessels. Ashley said people often contribute her fatigue to being a typical college student.“My exhaustion is debilitating; it’s not just something I can get over,” she said. “Yes, I’m a college student, and yes, I’m tired, but that is not necessarily a causal relationship.”Sophomore Claire Marks has endured similar criticism in dealing with her illness. Diagnosed with Fibromyalgia and Hypothyroidism at 15, Marks said, people often tell her she is “too young to be sick.”“Being told you don’t understand pain and you’re too young to be sick is really frustrating,” she said. “Just because an illness is invisible to everyone doesn’t mean it’s not there.”Senior Jackie Johnson suffers from cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease that causes a thick mucus buildup in the lungs and other organs. The effects of CF on her daily life include taking pills before meals and using a respiratory machine for an hour each day to clean her lungs. Because CF is a common genetic disease, Johnson said, people often try to compare her predicament with someone else they know who has the disease.“Every condition is so different with every person, and each person has different levels of openness when it comes to their illness,” she said.Sophomore Amy Mansfield spoke about her struggles with Type 1 Diabetes, which forces Mansfield to check her blood sugar five to eight times a day due to the risk of it fluctuating too high or too low.“Every day is different, so I’m just trying to find a perfect balance between food, insulin, stress, activity and whatever else life throws at me,” Mansfield said.While many people believe all her daily routine consists of is pricking her finger and using her pump, Mansfield said this is not true. Mansfield’s diabetes now prevents her body from telling her when her blood sugar is too low. To compensate for this, Mansfield now has a service dog, Juniper, who is able to detect an indicating chemical through smell when Mansfield’s blood sugar has dipped too low, and then pokes at Mansfield’s leg with her nose or paw to remind her to check her blood sugar.“She has likely saved my life countless times,” Mansfield said.Diagnosed with Crohn’s disease in high school, Keenan Hall rector Noel Terranova said his illness has played an important role in his life, as in college he became so sick he could not complete his semester abroad, and in his first year as rector, his disease flared up and led to a three week hospitalization. Following this incident, Terranova said he was inspired by how the Notre Dame community rallied around him.“People were able to know and understand the invisible illness that I had,” he said. “Keenan residents and other students came forward to me about their invisible illnesses.”As the group of of Invisililies is all female, Terranova also spoke specifically about the stigma of facing invisible illness as a man. Quite often, he said, he would “pretend that it didn’t exist and just be tougher.” That mentality as a man “can be a lie we tell ourselves,” he said, and called upon men of the Notre Dame community suffering from illness to develop networks of support with each other, with rectors and with the housing department, who is accommodates students with a variety of needs.“It’s really important to have networks of support, for people in your community to know what you’re going through,” said Terranova.Gabriela Leskur, a fifth-year who suffers from a blood clotting disorder, was recognized  for her honors thesis on invisible pain. Her work, a series of three films detailing people’s personal experiences with invisible illness, is on display from April 7 until May 21 in the Snite Museum.Dr. Anselma Dolcich-Ashley, an assistant professional specialist in the Glynn Family Honors program and the mother of panelist Rose Ashley, closed by thanking the panelists for their bravery, and recognized the importance of their shared stories.“You guys are teaching us to how to be empathetic, because we don’t know what to ask,” she said.Tags: invisible illness, Invisible Illness Awareness Day, Invisililieslast_img read more

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Notre Dame students discuss stereotyping on campus

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first_imgMary Steurer | The Observer Several campus organizations sponsored a panel discussion Thursday evening titled “What Sport Do you Play?” Eric Love moderated the discussion between Khalid Kareem, Jalen Elliott and Trebor Goodall.Kareem said he had a similar experience when he was approached by a stranger in public.“This guy — I don’t believe it — he walks up to me and he says, ‘Me and my manager were trying to figure out what sport you play. Where are you at school?’” he said. “I was like, ‘I play football, I go to Notre Dame, but what made you think I play sports?’”Elliott said these judgements extend into the classroom, where his peers often underestimate student-athletes’ academic ability.“I definitely think that you do hear those — ‘Oh the curve’s going to be great, I heard the curve is good,’ and it’s kind of like, ‘Why is the curve going to be good?’” he said. “But I think it gives us a certain drive to kind of go and seek the help we have.”Elliott does not define himself as a football player, but rather as someone who strives for success in all areas of his life, he added.“Yes, it is because of football that I got here, but now that I’m here, I want to excel in everything I do,” he said. “And so, once I got here, it was important to me to work as hard as possible — not just in football, but academically as well.”Kareem called on the Notre Dame community to be more empathetic towards student-athletes and mindful of the pressures their work puts on them.“At times it feels like the student body kind of goes against you, but when we’re good, everybody’s crazy — just keep it consistent,” he said.A Gates Millennium scholar and a student manager for the Notre Dame athletics department, Goodall said he actively works to combat assumptions made about African-American students.“Just me constantly being involved on campus and letting them know that black men are more than just what we can contribute physically, I think I’ve been doing a great job at that,” he said.Elliott said that encouraging conversation between student-athletes and non-athletes will help combat these stereotypes.“I think the biggest thing on just on both sides is just being there to talk to one another,” Elliot said. “ … Just because you never know if someone really might want to get to know you as a person.”Being inclusive towards students-athletes is another way to bridge the divide, Goodall said.“One of the things that I’ve tried to stay consistent in doing these four years is not assuming that the athletes don’t have time to come to stuff,” he said. “… Don’t be afraid to invite them to things, don’t be afraid to talk to them.”“[There’s] more to us than just football,” Kareem echoed. “We have so much more to offer besides that if you take the time to get to know us.”Tags: Black Student Association, sports, Walk the Walk Week, What sport do you play Members of the Notre Dame community came together to discuss the stereotyping of African-American students in a panel discussion titled “What Sport Do You Play?” in Visitation Hall. A part of Walk the Walk Week, the event was sponsored by student government, the Alliance for Catholic Education and several other campus organizations.Panelists included senior Trebor Goodall, president of the Notre Dame Black Student Association and Notre Dame football players senior Khalid Kareem and junior Jalen Elliott.The panel was moderated by Eric Love, director of staff diversity and inclusion.Love began the discussion by asking the panelists to think of a moment when others have made assumptions about them.Goodall recalled the first time he met his freshman year roommate.“His parents asked me, ‘Just curious, are you on scholarship or are you a student athlete here?’ And I was like, ‘No, I just came here to do school,’” he said.last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s alumna named assistant director of campus ministry

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first_imgCampus Ministry at Saint Mary’s welcomed a new addition to the department at the beginning of this year when Liz Palmer was named assistant director.Palmer is a Saint Mary’s alumna from the class of 2013. She was a biology and psychology double major and landed her dream job in Campus Ministry, she said.“I get to give back to the place that invited me to know my faith more deeply,” Palmer said.Some of the components of Palmer’s work with Campus Ministry are organizing retreats, leading pilgrimages both locally and internationally and organizing work with Catholic Relief Services (CRS).“[CRS is] making global issues more local, and being advocates on campus for topics like immigration, climate change [and] global hunger,” she said.Palmer is also focused on the social media side of Campus Ministry to advertise for different events through their various platforms.“We do want to invite people into conversation into worship spaces and just empower women on campus,” she said.She is using the presence of social media to promote her “I Found” campaign. Palmer reached out to a number of students and asked them to answer the question, “I have found [blank]” with the hashtag #throughfaithoncampus, she said.“It has been a way to share with others … if they have found faith on campus through extracurriculars, relationships with mentors or through the aesthetic beauty of the College,” Palmer said.One of Palmer’s goals as she kicks off the year is to cultivate relationships with students.“I want my office to be a welcoming environment for students to come in,” she said.She wants to also be able to expand outside of her office and interact with students all around campus. Palmer said students can get involved with Campus Ministry through the club Friends with Sisters. Students will be paired up with Sisters of the Holy Cross to connect with each other and their own faith.As the year progresses, Palmer said she is very excited for her fall break pilgrimage to Brazil to visit Sisters of the Holy Cross. She is also organizing a pilgrimage to Chicago’s Pilsen neighborhood on Sept. 20 to focus on Our Lady of Guadalupe.“[Participating students will] go beyond the walls of Saint Mary’s to a Pilsen neighborhood and see different murals, talk about the history and talk about living faith,” Palmer said.Palmer said there will be an opportunity for the tri-campus community to connect through Catholic Relief Services Ambassador Training on Sunday. This will offer networking between campuses and an opportunity to be an ambassador since it is a national program.“We’re going to be learning about advocacy training and how to tangibly bring ideas to campus,” she said.Palmer said she has many ideas she looks forward to sharing with the campus community. She wants to keep her door open, she said, to anyone interested in Campus Ministry to participate in the work she fell in love with while attending Saint Mary’s as a student.Tags: Campus Ministry, liz palmer, Sisters of the Holy Crosslast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s alumnae share how study abroad experiences impacted their lives in virtual panel

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first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Career Crossings Office and Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership co-sponsored an alumnae panel discussion on the impact of studying abroad through Zoom, Thursday night. Two alumnae, Jungquie Guan (’11) and Nellie Petlick (’16), shared stories about their times at Saint Mary’s, their study abroad experiences and the impact studying abroad had on their career paths and lives as a whole. Guan is originally from Chengdu, China, and studied abroad at Saint Mary’s while majoring in economics and French. While at Saint Mary’s, she studied abroad in France for a semester her sophomore year. Her unique “double” study abroad experience opened her eyes to an entirely new world, Guan said. She realized her love for dancing, especially ballet, while taking a dance class offered by Saint Mary’s. “Dance became a vehicle for me to make French friends while abroad,” she said.Guan also met one of her best friends while abroad in France. In the trips to Europe following her study abroad experience, Guan visited her life-long friend, and still communicates with her often.After graduating from Saint Mary’s, Guan earned her masters in International Education Policy from Harvard University and an MFA in Dance Performance at the University of Iowa. She is currently working on her doctorate in Culture and Performance at University of California Los Angeles. Petlick studied in Rome in the spring of 2014, and shared some of her experiences in the Zoom panel. She was a history and theater double major at Saint Mary’s, so traveling to Rome encompassed all of her interests, she said. From the time of her commitment to attend Saint Mary’s, Petlick knew she wanted to study abroad, and she was set on going to Rome. She said she did not necessarily think of going to Rome as a tool to help her future career, but she wanted to focus on her history major and knew Rome was the place to be. Petlick said her time in Rome challenged her American ethnocentrism and pushed her outside of her daily way of thinking and living.“It was just humbling to be in another country where I was the outsider,” Petlick said. “[I] realized America was not the center of the world … I began to view things as not right or wrong but just different.” Her time in Rome exposed her to things she would have never experienced otherwise, she added, and influenced her to be open to situations where the impact might be different from what she was expecting.After graduating from Saint Mary’s, Petlick strayed from her intended career path, entered the Peace Corps and moved to Ukraine from 2016 to 2018. During that time, she worked in Ukraine at the State Department for EducationUSA, where she talked with international students about her time at Saint Mary’s. She now attends Yale University, where she is pursuing her master’s of Public Policy. After graduating in 2022, Petlick hopes to join the U.S. Foreign Service as a diplomat. Both Guan and Petlick encouraged students to study abroad while in college, an experience that offers the unique opportunity to live and immerse yourself in a culture for an extended period of time. Both women said their study abroad experiences and their years at Saint Mary’s empowered them in unimaginable ways, and opened up doors they did not know even existed.Tags: Career Crossings Office, culture, Peace Corps, SMC alumnae, study abroadlast_img read more

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Homestead Stables Equestrian Center Pauses Operations

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first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) WNY News Now File Image.GERRY — Homestead Stables, a local horse center offering inter-generational equestrian opportunities, boarding, training, lessons, and a therapeutic riding program, will pause operations starting Sept. 1.Lisa Haglund, Heritage President and CEO, said the Homestead Stables Equestrian Center will pause all operations and will, while shut down, conduct a feasibility study, competitive analysis, and due diligence to determine what the Center’s future might look like, or when operations may resume.“Heritage has always been committed to putting the safety and well-being of all God’s creatures we’ve been entrusted to care for as our top priority, including those who called the Homestead Stables their home. It is with sincere gratitude that we thank our community for their patience and understanding as we work through the many challenges of this global pandemic,” Haglund said.“Throughout the pandemic, we have been forced to suspend stables events, lessons, and clinics. The heavy financial burden of this pandemic has also forced us to make many difficult decisions across all of Heritage,” she went on to say. last_img read more

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60-Year-Old Man Dies From COVID-19 In Chautauqua County

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first_imgWNY News Now / MGN Stock Image.MAYVILLE – A 60-year-old Chautauqua County man with underlying health conditions has died after being sickened with COVID-19.County Health officials reported the news on Tuesday.This is the third COVID-19 related death reported this week, with 13 people dying from the virus since the outbreak started.Three new cases of infection were also reported on Tuesday, all residents living in Dunkirk. There are now 48 active cases, with 295 people under quarantine or isolation orders by the Public Health Director.Not all of those being monitored are confirmed to have COVID-19 but have either shown symptoms, are awaiting results, or have risk factors.Three people are hospitalized with the virus in the county.To date there have been 701 confirmed cases of the virus with 640 recovering. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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