爱上海,上海419论坛,上海龙凤419 – Powered by Brooklynn Wilbert!

Archives for: December 31, 2020

California, New York and Virginia Restate Commitment to Federal Emission Rules

Posted on by

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Annalee Grant for SNL:Some states, however, restated their commitment to complying with the Clean Power Plan, expressing disappointment in the high court’s decision. California Governor Jerry Brown had harsh words for the Supreme Court justices who voted in favor of granting the unprecedented stay.“As the world gets hotter and closer to irreversible climate change, these justices appear tone-deaf as they fiddle with procedural niceties,” Brown said in a Feb. 9 statement. “This arbitrary roadblock does incalculable damage and undermines America’s climate leadership. But make no mistake, this won’t stop California from continuing to do its part under the Clean Power Plan.”New York Governor Andrew Cuomo in a statement posted to his official Twitter account reaffirmed his state’s commitment to moving forward with “actions to protect the environment and public health.” Cuomo called the stay “a disappointing setback in the nation’s efforts to address climate change.”Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe also vowed to “stay the course” and continue working toward a compliance strategy.Full article ($): Carbon rule planning ends in some states, as others plan to stay the course California, New York and Virginia Restate Commitment to Federal Emission Ruleslast_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , .

Coal Industry Paid Lavish Executive Bonuses as Companies Collapsed

Posted on by

first_imgCoal Industry Paid Lavish Executive Bonuses as Companies Collapsed FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Benjamin Storrow for the Casper (Wyo.) Star Tribune:In 2011, the coal industry went on a shopping spree. China’s economy was humming, and there seemed no limit to the amount of coal the country’s steel mills could consume. America’s coal companies, sensing an opportunity, rushed to acquire mines that produced the metallurgical coal essential to steel fabrication.Arch Coal paid $3.4 billion cash for the International Coal Group. Peabody Energy plunked down $5 billion for a majority stake in Australia’s MacArthur Coal. And Alpha Natural Resources shelled out $7.1 billion for Massey Energy, a metallurgical miner based in Appalachia.Executives at the three firms were handsomely rewarded in the following years. The three companies paid their respective management teams a combined $186 million in stock awards, incentives and other forms of compensation between 2012 and 2014, according to a Star-Tribune review of the firms’ financial filings.Their companies did not benefit to the same degree. Alpha, Arch and Peabody have failed to record an annual profit since 2011. Two of the firms, Alpha and Arch, are now in bankruptcy, and Peabody may soon join them.The story of their demise is now well-known. Chinese demand faltered, metallurgical coal prices collapsed and American mining firms watched as the domestic market for thermal coal contracted, decimated by cheap natural gas.But executives’ lavish pay packages, and the acquisitions that preceded them, are now drawing increased criticism as mining firms move to cut payroll, reduce retiree benefits and unload old debts.Peabody and Arch laid off a total of 460 miners at their North Antelope Rochelle and Black Thunder mines on the same day last month. The companies have not said how much the cuts will save. But based on the average annual coal miner’s wage of $82,000, the layoffs would save the pair around $37 million in annual wages, or 84 percent of the $44 million Peabody and Arch paid their executives teams in 2014.Alpha is seeking to cut retiree benefits for some 4,580 nonunion miners and their spouses. That move is expected to save $3 million annually, or about 14 percent of the $20.8 million Alpha paid its management in 2014.“The behavior of these executives seems to me pretty outrageous. They could see the handwriting on the wall,” said Gary Hufbauer, a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington, D.C. “The numbers are there. They started paying themselves out way back in 2012 or early 2013 when the numbers were turning.”The coal industry is hardly alone in offering its executives generous compensation. CEO pay at America’s largest firms grew by 997 percent, adjusting for inflation, between 1978 and 2014, according to data compiled by the Economic Policy Institute, a think tank.But the nature of the coal industry sets the compensation industry executives received apart, observers say. The mining sector is cyclical. Fortunes rise and fall with commodity prices. And coal executives should have recognized they were entering a metallurgical market at or near its height, critics argue.Peabody paid its top executive accordingly. Boyce’s total compensation was $9.5 million in 2012, $10.8 million in 2013 and almost $11 million in 2014, according to filings with the U.S Securities and Exchange Commission.Arch, like Peabody, has continued to hand out bonuses to its executives in recent months. Seven Arch executives, including Eaves, Drexler and Lang, received about $8 million in bonuses three days before the company filed for bankruptcy in January, according to the Wall Street Journal. Eaves received $2.78 million on Jan. 8, while Lang and Drexler collected $1.75 million and $1.17 million respectively.Alpha Natural Resource in January submitted a request in bankruptcy court to pay its executive team up to $14.8 million in bonuses. The additional compensation, which is contingent on Alpha’s financial performance, was needed to address a decrease in executive pay and to navigate a complexities of bankruptcy, the company said.Alpha later reduced the request to $11.9 million — an amount ultimately approved by a federal bankruptcy judge. Alpha has recorded the biggest losses of the three firms analyzed for this story. The company lost $4.4 billion between 2012 and 2014. Bankruptcy filings for 2015 put its losses for that year at $1.3 billion.And like its peers, Alpha rewarded its executives handsomely since its $7.1 billion purchase of Massey Energy. The company paid its management team about $62 million between 2012 and 2014. The value of the company, meanwhile, plummeted. When Alpha released its restructuring plan last month, it set a minimum bid for the sale of its most productive mines. The sum was $500 million.As coal company profits fell, mining firms rewarded executives handsomelylast_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , .

Best Strength Building Exercises for Every Sport

Posted on by

first_imgAdventure sports like running, hiking, and biking demand such high levels of endurance that athletes tend to forget about training for strength building exercises. “Most riders think they have to put in more time on the bike to get faster, but incorporating strength training will deliver greater results,” says pro mountain bike trainer James Wilson. Wilson, who trains downhill pros, singlespeed champions, and back of the packers alike, developed the MTB Strength Training System, a guide for bikers that puts an emphasis on full-body strength building exercises. “Strength equals technical ability on a bike, pure and simple,” Wilson says.Most pro coaches from all endurance sports now incorporate strength training in their athletes’ routines. We’ve found some of the best strength training exercises geared to specific adventure athletes. Use the plan below to get stronger for your favorite sport, or combine the exercises for a full body shake down.THE RUNNERSingle-leg squats: Bend your right knee slightly and raise your left foot off the ground in front of you so you’re standing only on your right leg. Bend your leg, trying to keep your back straight and left foot in front of you, so you drop into a squat. Go as low as you can, and return to a standing position. Repeat 10 times with each leg. Works: Quads and glutes“Some runners overlook strength training,” says running coach Jennifer Gill. “But strength training prevents injuries by providing running economy and keeping your form true when you get tired.”Side Plank: From a push up position, pull your right hand off the ground while twisting your torso, and extend your right arm perpendicular to your body. Your entire body should be supported by your left arm and left leg. Keep your torso straight. Hold for 10 seconds and repeat on the other side. Works: abs, lower back, shoulders THE BIKERBulgarian Squats: Rest the top of your foot on a bench behind you, your other foot stretched in front of you. Drop down so your back knee touches the ground, then explode back up. That’s one rep. Do ten on each side and repeat. Works: Quads, calves, and hips Split Squats: Holding light dumbbells in each hand, stand with your feet split wide, one in front, one in back. Bend your front knee, lowering your body toward the ground, keeping your spine straight, and the heel of your front foot planted on the ground. When your back knee touches the ground, rise up. That’s one rep. Do 20 reps, then switch your front foot and do 20 more. Works: Quads, glutes, coreTHE PADDLERBoat Pose: Sit on the floor holding a rock or weight away from your chest. Lean back and raise your legs so your entire body is balanced on your sitting bones (your body should look like the bottom of a boat). Holding this pose alone should activate your core. Next, rotate the weight to your right side, trying to touch it to the ground. Then rotate left. That’s one rep. Do 15, rest, and do 15 more. Works: Core and shoulders Side Press: Standing straight, with a dumbbell in each hand resting at your shoulders, bend your upper body to the left while pushing your right hip out. At the same time, press the right dumbbell toward the ceiling. Lower and return to an erect position. That’s one rep. Do ten on each side, rest, and do ten more.Works: Core and shoulders THE CLIMBERAngled Pole Climb: On a playground, sit at the base of an angled swingset pole. Wrap your ankles around the base of the pole and grip the pole with your hands at eye level. Pull yourself to the top, then lower back down. Do 5 repeats. Works: Core and shoulders, back, handsSwingset Push Ups: On the same playground, get in a push-up position with your toes resting on the seat of a swing. Do a push up, then pull your knees into your chest, hold, then extend them again. That’s one rep. Do 10 reps, rest, then do 10 more. Works: Chest, core, shoulders, hipsELEMENTARY SCHOOL WORKOUTWant to see serious gains in your endurance and strength and have fun in the process? Work out like an eight-year-old. Some of the classic gym-class exercises you dreaded as a kid employ key principles of functional fitness.“The older you are, the better your school PE was,” says Dan MacDougald, owner of Crossfit Atlanta. Crossfit training uses a variety of basic movements, many of which are familiar to athletes from their school days. “There’s a lot of worth to the exercises we used to do in PE. Physical education has been dumbed down in recent years, but at one time, kids got a good workout.”Try these three “old school” exercises for a full body shakedown.Rope ClimbThe dreaded rope climb engages all of the workhorse muscles in your upper body, and builds muscle endurance as well as strength, which is key in succeeding at adventure sports like climbing, paddling, and mountain biking. Try five rope repeats, and gradually rely less on your legs to move up the rope. Can’t find a gym rope? Climb a tree instead.Jumping Rope10 minutes of jumping rope will burn as many calories as jogging for 10 minutes at eight-minutes-per-mile pace. For a simple workout, try jump intervals. Jump as many times as you can in 30 seconds, then rest for 30. Next, jump swinging the rope backwards for 30 seconds, and rest for 30. Do 10 minutes of intervals and build from there.Shuttle RunThis gym-class staple builds speed, agility, and endurance. Place two blocks (in school we used erasers) or rocks 30 feet from your starting point. Sprint from the starting line to the first block, pick it up and sprint back to the line, set the block down and sprint back to the second block, picking it up and sprinting back to the start. Time yourself. In 1985, an eight-year-old had to finish the run in 11.1 seconds to be considered for the Presidential Fitness Award.last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , .

Ringing in the New Year

Posted on by

first_imgAnne on course during a 2010 24-hour run.This year, I chose an unusual way to spend New Year’s Eve. While my friends were at parties or celebrating at home cozied up next to the fire with a DVD, I was running laps around the almost one-mile loop at Morganton’s Freedom Park. One hundred and forty-two of them, to be exact. Why, in heaven’s name, you might ask, would I partake in something so mind-numbing, so exhausting, so absurd? I asked myself that same question many times that night, and I guess the best answer was “because it was there.”Believe it or not, this activity that I participated in was an organized event, The Freedom Park New Year’s Ultra Run. I chose the 24 hour option and thirty-five other brave souls made the same brave — or foolish?– decision.Many people, runners and non-runners alike, have asked me why I compete in 24-hour races. Yes, races plural. Last week’s event was the third of this type for me. Each time I’ve sworn to myself “never again”, because it is a pretty miserable experience in a lot of ways. I guess the best answer is that I have a deep inner need to challenge myself, and at this point in my running career and my life, this feels like a good way to do that. In the weeks after finishing an event, I find myself thinking about ways I could improve upon that performance, things I could do differently next time, and before I know it, I’ve taken the plunge and sent in an entry form.I decided to run this race back in September, and in the months leading up to the event, my training was going well and I was super motivated. Then the holidays hit, and with them, the dreaded taper. I found myself completely out of my training routine and shoulder-deep in holiday treats – sugar cookies, fudge, cheesecake. By the time the 31st rolled around, I felt like a giant walking ball of sugar. Running for 24 hours straight was the last thing I wanted to do, but since I had already paid my entry fee, I figured I might as well go ahead with it.For those of you who haven’t run or watched this type of race, let me be the first to tell you that it’s not an exciting event. It’s all about patience. For the first twelve hours, not a lot happens. For the runners, however, it’s a pretty important portion of the race. Races aren’t won in the first twelve hours, but they can sure be lost. I had my game plan, which was to run three laps, followed by a four-minute walk break. It was a challenge to walk that early in the race, especially as my competition was not. It can be demoralizing to be lapped, over and over again, yet I knew that if I was going to stick it out for the long haul, this is how I had to do it. One fellow competitor even remarked that he had confused me for someone fast until he saw me walking and realized that he must have been mistaken.So that’s how it went – run for twenty-five minutes or so, walk for four. Over and over and over. The race began at eight a.m. and by mid afternoon, I was feeling tired and bored. Ready for the finish and knowing that a long cold night was between me and that finish line. The whining commenced. Each time I circled the track and returned to my husband, who, by the way, had to stay up all night enduring the cold and fatigue without any endorphins to lighten his mood, I would whisper in a baby voice, I’m not sure I can do this. Being the compassionate soul that he is, he would refuse to allow me to indulge in self-pity, instead giving me a little shove indicating that it was time to begin another lap.By the time darkness fell, I knew that he wasn’t going to allow me to quit. And I knew in my heart that I would continue, no matter how much it sucked. I promised myself that this would be my last 24-hour race – actually, my last race ever – and if I could only finish, I would live out my remaining years as a couch potato. I grabbed my iPod and powered it up to the page-turning audiobook that I had downloaded the week before. And a miraculous thing happened – I began to feel good. Okay, not good, but at least not like I was at death’s door. I churned out the laps, one by one, cheering on my fellow crazies – err, competitors. Before I knew it, the faint glow of the sunrise emerged from the east and a new day – and year – was dawning.I finished the race with a good attitude, helped in part by a shiny new PR. What a way to welcome in the new year! I have thanked my husband multiple times for forcing me to forge on when I felt I could not. As is always the case, I’m glad that I persevered, even though it was quite a challenge at times. As for my promise to never do this again? The competitor within me is already contemplating ways I could go just a little further next time…Editor’s Note: Though she is too humble to mention it, Anne Lundblad won overall at the Freedom Park Ultra, set the course record, and turned in the fourth best performance ever by a North American woman. Lundblad covered 140 miles in 24 hours.last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , .

Legends of Ohiopyle

Posted on by

first_imgNestled among the rugged Laurel Highlands of Pennsylvania lies an old logging town with an international renown that far outweighs its scant population of 59.That town is Ohiopyle, a sleepy little place with a few old buildings and one main road that runs through town uninterrupted by stop sign or traffic light. But what it lacks in appearances it makes up for in one thing. Whitewater.Picture this: a one-mile class III “Loop” on the Lower Youghiogheny (Yough) in your front yard, the natural bend of the river making a shuttle unnecessary; a half-hour-drive to the put-in of the class IV+ Upper Yough; another 45-minute drive to any of the Yough’s steep class V tributaries along with countless other runs in the area like Big Sandy and the Cheat River Canyon; and, of course, a killer Thursday night yoga class by Yogi Wade paired with brews, foods, and tunes at the local Falls City Pub. That sleepy little town doesn’t seem so drowsy anymore, right?It’s a diamond in the rough no doubt, yet one whose reputation for world-class whitewater, and whitewater paddlers, is incomparable. Rewind 30-some years to the late ‘70s and ‘80s, to an era that saw the rebirthing of whitewater paddling and a boom in the industry right on the waters of the Yough. Whether raft guide, entrepreneur, or downright gutsy kayaker, you can’t tell the history of paddling in the ‘Pyle without mentioning the following five individuals.ERIC MARTINOwner •Wilderness VoyageursEric Martin never anticipated taking over the family rafting business. His father, Lance Martin, had started one of the first rafting companies in Ohiopyle, Wilderness Voyageurs, with his wife in 1964. Although Martin worked for his parents during the season, in his eyes, that job was merely a means to an end.“I worked as a raft guide to earn money to go kayaking somewhere else,” Martin says. “I was on the water twice a day, every day, year-round.”Inspired by other world-class kayakers like Jon Lugbill and Kent Ford who also frequented the Yough, Martin took his passion for paddling to a competitive level. In 1983, he began slalom racing and would continue to do so for over a decade, placing second in the junior world championships and making it all the way to the team trials for the Olympic games in 1996.“There were no boat companies sponsoring athletes in the ‘70s and ‘80s,” Martin recalls, “but when you’re talking and paddling with U.S. team members who are traveling around the world going kayaking, that seems like a pretty good idea at 14 years old.”But, as life would have it, the year 1991 saw a turn of events that sent Martin from his competitive tour around the world back to his hometown to take over Wilderness Voyageurs. Martin has kept the business going strong and the company is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, making it the oldest rafting outfitter in the East. Although Martin no longer has the flexibility to get out on the water “twice a day, every day, year round,” the outfitter is conveniently located across the train tracks from the Lower Yough take-out.“We’re in the crucible of whitewater in this country,” Martin says. “Whether it’s a flatwater workout or ramping it up and running class Vs, it’s all available. That’s a lot of quality of life right there.”KARA WELDCo-owner •Immersion ResearchAlthough Kara Weld grew up on the banks of the Yough, she was born and raised not in Ohiopyle but in Confluence, just a short 30-minute drive over the mountain. Her father was an avid outdoorsman, and together, the two learned to kayak.“We were the biggest geeks on the river,” Weld remembers. “I’m pretty sure I had a big football helmet on.”As Weld grew older, so too did her love of kayaking. Although Ohiopyle had a crew of older guys who paddled daily, Weld was just a kid still. More than that, Weld was a girl, and women paddlers in the ‘80s were far and few between. When a new kayaking school opened in town and the owner started a kid’s group, Weld immediately signed up. In less than a year, she was racing at her first slalom event.From the Lower Yough to the Ocoee River, Weld was on the water nearly every weekend, either training or competing. In 1984, Weld earned a spot on the U.S. junior team, which launched her kayaking career. Suddenly she was no longer dinking around on the Middle Yough with her dad and her beater gear; she was paddling some of the most difficult runs in the world.“I think I swam in every country I visited,” Weld says. “I was very timid in harder whitewater.”Keep in mind that Weld was just a teenager at the time. Eventually, she would move up the ranks, becoming a three-time U.S. National Women’s Champion who competed on the U.S. team for 20 years. In 1995 she married her husband John and two years later, made the decision to quit the competition scene. That same year, Weld returned to her hometown of Confluence to embark on a new adventure.“My husband said, ‘We should make kayaking gear.’ I told him, ‘You’re insane.’”Thus Immersion Research (IR) was born, a kayaking gear manufacturer based out of Confluence that made its splash onto the marketplace by making rash guards and surf trunks, the labor taking place in the Weld family basement. Now, IR produces everything from base layers to dry suits, a staple brand among Ohiopyle’s many raft guides and paddlers.JESS WHITTEMOREChief engineer • Immersion Research“It was like a renaissance of kayaking.”That’s how Jess Whittemore describes the whitewater scene in Ohiopyle during the late ‘70s and early ‘80s, a time of change and innovation, when awkwardly long composite boats were the industry standard and the slickest, sickest moves entailed twirling your paddle around your neck. For Whittemore, who moved to the area from Albright, W.Va., to raft guide for another outfitter in town, the ‘80s in particular brought about one of the greatest changes of all, a development he was largely responsible for: the introduction of three-dimensional boating.“I discovered pillow squirting and blasting holes and it really revolutionized the sport,” Whittemore says. “It eventually turned into present-day play boating and it’s fantastic what they’re doing now, things I never dreamed of.”With fellow paddler and friend Jon Lugbill, Whittemore continued to challenge himself to invent different moves. As he continued to push, he began to tap into the currents that not only flow on the water’s surface but also beneath and around the features. In opening up this entirely unexplored realm of possibilities, Whittemore realized that the boat styles at that time could not perform the moves he knew were possible.“I designed my first kayak right there in the garage,” Whittemore says. “I called it the Millennium Falcon. It was the first squirt boat really, although I didn’t know it then.”Whittemore was one of a few other paddlers in town who were beginning to design their own boats, the most prominent of those being Jim Snyder who began specifically crafting squirt boats. Whittemore continued to build boats throughout his paddling career, working in the shop when he wasn’t on the water.“I was the quintessential kayak bum,” he says. “I was so busy barely making money by making boats that my full and complete attention was really just to be a great kayaker.”Whittemore eventually took his creative outlet to Immersion Research where he continues to work as the chief engineer. He designs everything from dry tops to spray skirts, and although his paddling heyday has simmered down a bit, he remains active in the paddling community by fighting for recreational boating dam releases in the area.PHIL COLEMANRaft guide • Wilderness VoyageursAlthough the commercial rafting scene in Ohiopyle mostly centers on running the Yough and the nearby Cheat River Canyon, a select few of the area’s boaters in the late 1970s were hungry for more. Phil Coleman was at the forefront of that group, a raft guide by day and kayaker by night.“There were a lot of egos flying around back then,” Coleman says. “The highest concentration of kayakers pushing the envelope in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s were located in Ohiopyle. The sport was going through a true revolution.”Like most paddlers in town, Coleman was on the water nearly every day and had been raft guiding for the local outfitters since high school. He joined names like Dean Tomko, Roger Zbel, and the Snyder brothers on the water, and soon Coleman was part of an elite paddling posse that was running some of the steepest creeks around. In 1978, Coleman, accompanied by Jim Snyder and Mike Fentress, set a record in the paddling community, knocking off a first descent of the infamous Quarry Run.“There were lots of smash ups and pins and broken boats and near close calls, but that was definitely one of my greater accomplishments at the time,” Coleman says, failing to mention that he was the near close call. Now, over 30 years since that record-setting first descent, Coleman is still an active boater and member of the paddling community.“Maybe something’s wrong with me, but I love it. It’s just plain fun,” he says.Coleman splits his time between Albright, W.Va., Ohiopyle, Penn., and Costa Rica so that he can be on or around the water year-round. In Costa Rica, he started his own eco-tourism adventure outfitter called RainForest World and regularly guides tourists down everything from class IV+ whitewater to scenic float trips.TOM LOVEOwner • Airtight InflatablesIf you don’t know who Tom Love is, you’ve likely seen boaters taking his brainchild down rivers around the world, or maybe you even own one yourself. The shredder, an inflatable river craft, was one of those inventions that came out of that whitewater renaissance of the ‘80s. Prior to crafting the shredder, Love had not only been an avid paddler and raft guide, but also a boat repairman.“For awhile, every company that built boats had me as their warranty center,” Love says. “Finally I said, ‘Well gee whiz, these people are building screwed-up boats. I can screw up boats just as easy as they can.’”In 1978, Love quit the business of repairing other companies’ boats to focus his energy on crafting his own line of inflatable rafts. Already an iconic figure in the rafting industry around Ohiopyle, Love was easily able to strike deals with local outfitters and made just enough money to continue experimenting with boat designs while supporting himself. The idea for the shredder came about in the mid-1980s when a friend of Love came to him with a request. He needed a boat that was faster than traditional rafts so he could get ahead of commercial trips and shoot video, the early predecessor of a video boater.“If not for huge video cameras, these shredders would have never been built,” Love says.That first prototype looks much like the present-day shredder, and it wasn’t long before Love abandoned producing traditional oval rafts to exclusively making shredders.“For a while I was only making demos, but I kept selling the sons-o’-bitches,” he says, a testament to the cutting-edge-inflatable’s increasing popularity. Since then, other raft manufacturing companies have tried their hand at producing similar crafts; however, Love’s base in Ohiopyle and his connections in the region ensure that the shredder craze will live on.last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , .

Tour of the James to Capture 360-Degree View of the James River

Posted on by

first_imgThe James River Association (JRA) and Richmond-based Outside Ventures, LLC, have embarked on a digital filming project to capture the scenery of the James River in a completely new way.For the first time, online viewers will be able to explore the entire 340-mile length of the James River through high-resolution, 360-degree panoramic images. The Tour of the James will be the first comprehensive photo documentary of an entire river and will allow viewers to travel from the headwaters of the James to its mouth at the Chesapeake Bay.Six cameras mounted on a stainless steel housing 10 feet above the water’s surface will capture panoramic photos every 30 feet from a custom-made pontoon raft floating down river. These high-resolution photos will then be stitched together to create a 360-degree augmented reality map of the river corridor.james-river-project-panoThe Tour of the James was initiated as a result of Envision the James, a collaborative effort between National Geographic, the Chesapeake Conservancy and JRA. It is the hope that the Tour of the James will share the river experience with a wider audience, empowering Virginians to further explore the wild beauty of the James River.The project will include a virtual and interactive interpretation of natural, recreational and historic features in the river corridor, such as notable rapids, boat ramps and Civil War sites.“The project is going well, though slower than anticipated due to lower water in the James. In deeper sections, we can use the 2.5-horsepower gas motor, and we make really good time. But with the lack of rain throughout the watershed, we’re scraping the bottom a bunch and we can’t use that more powerful motor,” said Outside Venture’s Andy Thompson.“It’s important for a couple of different reasons,” said Thompson. “First, it’ll be the first entire river mapped in this way. Google did about 200 miles of the Colorado River. We’re doing the whole James — 340-ish miles — and we’re doing it with better cameras and higher-resolution images. Second, the finished tour will be like a base map that will allow us to create what we call “augmented reality” maps of the river. Imagine a regular 2D map with clickable waypoints (that give you more information/images/video about a given sight) but in 3D. So, for instance, you could use our tours to create a panoramic image map of bald eagle nests in the tidal James River. Or a map of historical sites, boat ramps, fishing holes, etc. The tour of the river and all the sections that we break it up into will be cool, but the really neat aspect of all this going forward will be the maps we can create with those panoramic scenes.”Follow along with the trip via Twitter (#mapJR and #EnvisionTheJames) and Instagram at @Terrain360. To see examples of Outside Ventures’ other 360-degree tours, visit www.terrain360.com.last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , .

Beer For Gear

Posted on by

first_imgIt’s been just over a year now since I wrote an article on My Fellow Millennials, a piece dedicated to denouncing the stereotypes made about the Millennial generation. By putting the spotlight on seven regional twenty-somethings who are doing cool things, my mission was to showcase that Millennials are not narcissistic, lazy, uncreative, and as addicted to technology as the older generations let themselves believe. Actually, the Millennial generation as I know it has proven time and again to be quite the opposite.Fearless. Patient. Radical. Inspirational. Tough. Grounded. Ambitious.After those eight interviews with ultrarunners, environmental economists, Montessori guides, and farmers, these were the words that came to mind about my generation. Now, a year later, I still feel very passionately that hope for our future lies in the Millennials’ hands. If anything, our older generations should not look on us with doubt and criticism – they should be proud at what we have managed to accomplish so far in the face of international turmoil and environmental crises. They should look not at statistics and sweeping generalizations about twenty-somethings, but at the twenty-somethings themselves who are actively carving out a lifestyle that incorporates passion with doing good, whether it’s on the community front or the international scale.That’s where Theresia Hinton comes into play.I met Theresia through my road ramblings this past summer. Based out of Asheville, N.C., Theresia is a Millennial who works long hours at the ER at Mission Health as an Emergency Department Tech. While she loves hiking and biking in and around Asheville, her true passion lies in helping others. As the volunteer Outreach and Fundraising Director for the non-profit MedicForce, Theresia was tasked with the duty of creating a fundraiser to help raise awareness and money for building a health clinic in Kenya. Her idea? Tap into the outdoor recreation community in western North Carolina and host an event that no adventure nut can turn down – Beer For Gear.“We’ve seen an incredible response,” Theresia says on the subject of reaching out to outdoor brands for donations. “The fact that we’ve had local companies donate gear or items to us who don’t know anything about MedicForce is amazing.”From SylvanSport to Watershed Drybags, Pyranha Kayaks, Astral Designs, Threshold Provisions, Adventure Technology Paddles, ENO, and Catawba Brewing (just to name a few), Theresia’s not kidding about that impressive response.1422467_835207869831780_7655148472260435250_nThe idea of Beer For Gear is simple. Show up to Catawba Brewing in Asheville, Thursday night at 5:30pm, bring a piece of new or used gear to donate to MedicForce, and you get a free beer (and who doesn’t love free beer). Those items will then be placed on a table for direct purchase – name your price, pay up, and the gear is yours. What’s more, that money you spend will go directly to the construction of that health clinic in Kenya (so treat yourself, and shop big). In addition to this yard sale of sorts, Theresia will be putting on both a silent auction and a raffle for the products donated by the above-mentioned (and many more) brands.Paddles, PFDs, drysuits, drybags, a 60-minute massage, a free WFR course, even a few kayaks! Thus far, Theresia has secured over 20 items to be included in the raffle and silent auction. From local artisans and coffee roasters to internationally recognized outdoor brands, it seems that everyone everywhere has been more than willing to support the cause.Attachment-1For those of you that don’t know anything about MedicForce, look ’em up. Theresia first got involved with the organization after taking her EMT course at the NOC, where she met the head of MedicForce and hopped on board a trip to Belize. For nearly two weeks, she traveled with the organization from village to village teaching women in particular about their bodies, cervical cancer, and basic health education and first aid.“A lot of people don’t know this, but the healthcare workers in these villages are oftentimes either voted in or they volunteer despite having no medical experience,” Theresia says. “Our goal is to go in and see what they know, what kind of access to natural medicines they have, what they want to know, and then to stay there as long as they need us. Compared to other charities, we don’t want to just throw medical supplies at them and say ‘we fixed you’ and leave. We want to let them teach us, create a sustainable healthcare system, and then work from there.”That trip to Belize was life-changing for Theresia. She returned to the States with a newfound appreciation for the life she led here, but with an itch to do more. Though she has been the sole organizer for this fundraiser, a task that has eaten up nearly every hour she’s not sleeping or working a 12-hour shift at the ER, Theresia says she is more than happy to help with a cause she feels so passionately about.“After Belize, just seeing the smiles on people’s faces and the gratitude for what we were doing, that made it all worth it,” she says. “I’d say for people who want to do good but feel like they can’t, go after something you love and nothing else will really matter. Money isn’t a factor in donating to a cause. There are so many other ways you can help organizations.”If you’re in the Asheville area this Thursday (or even if you’re not) come out to Catawba Brewing to support the cause and walk away with some awesome gear. Even if you don’t end the evening with a new Pyranha kayak or AT paddle in hand, you’ll be supporting a good cause and drinking a good beer (or three) in the company of good people. What more could you ask for? Raffle tickets are cheap too – 1 for $5 and 5 for $20.Check out the Facebook event here for more information on the raffle and silent auction items as well as updates on the fundraiser.last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , .

Move East Young Brewer: Stone Ruination Double IPA 2.0

Posted on by

first_imgBy now you’ve probably heard the rumor that Deschutes Brewery is scoping out Asheville as the future home of their new East Coast distribution hub.Asheville is one of a number of sites Deschutes is looking at, but all of the sites listed in the original Citizen Times article are here in the Southern Appalachians.Which means another kickass brewery is probably coming to town. By my latest tally, that means that roughly, well, a lot of the West’s most lauded craft breweries are now setting up shop here in our humble mountains. Oskar Blues and Sierra Nevada are already here, New Belgium is building out their massive brewery, Green Flash and Stone are moving to Virginia…and now Deschutes is looking for real estate.I don’t want to think about what would happen to the economy in a town like Asheville if the craft beer market tanks. Like, if everyone in America wakes up one day and goes, “you know what? I’ll just have a Bud. Or Sangria.”We’d be screwed.But I’m a glass half full kind of guy, so I’m not going to think about that. Instead, I’m going to think about all the great beer that’s going to be produced here in our hills and readily available in local markets. Beer like this: Stone Brewing Co.’s Ruination Double IPA.If you’re not a fan of the IPA, then just move on. Don’t bother reading anymore, because this is a beast of an IPA. Pop the cap and you can smell the hops from across the room. Dank and fruity and earthy.You might expect Ruination to be a bitter bomb like the IPAs of the past that were so caught up with tipping the IBU scale, that most other aspects of the beer were sacrificed at the Altar of the Hop. But the beauty of big IPAs these days, is that they’re not just bitter bombs. Thanks to new hop strains and more refined brewing practices, we can now have a monstrous IPA like Ruination that’s sweet and tangy as well as hoppy. Think of it like a seven layer dip. Individually, each layer is pretty good. Put them all together, and those layers make a party.last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , .

Trail Mix | March 2017

Posted on by

first_img 3:15 Just To Watch Maria Dance (Unreleased Writer Demo) Guy Clark American Cinematography Cindy Lee Berryhill Copy and paste this code to your site to embed. 2:39 3:23 Better Bad Idea Sunny Sweeney 3:33 Chains Rose Cousins Pick Up The Pieces Curse Of Lono 3:08 Shadows Through A Canyon Fort Defiance Count Me Out Toma 4:04 A Brand New Deal Bill Scorzari All With You Ha Ha Tonka Knock-Kneed Ballerina The Kernal 3:13 Take Five Ned Luberecki What You Did To The Boy Aint Right Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band Embed 3:13 Eight More Miles To Louisville Danny Barnes Predator Will Johnson 3:16 Please, don’t be the kid that kills Colin Hay.It might be hard to believe that I offered those very words to my oldest son, but it’s absolutely true. It was sage advive given to John Patrick, four years ago, when he was tasked with driving a golf cart carrying Colin Hay, singer of Australian rock icons Men At Work, from one stage to another during a music festival we were working.Be careful. Get him there safely. You don’t want to be the kid who killed Colin Hay.John Patrick drove well for a thirteen year old, Colin was delivered safely, and his second set went off without a hitch. Now, Hay is set to release Fierce Mercy, his thirteenth solo record.I am thrilled to include “A Thousand Million Reasons” on this month’s edition of Trail Mix.Another track that is particularly exciting this month is “Take Five” from banjo master Ned Luberecki. Dave Brubeck’s piano driven masterpiece of the same name has long been one of my favorite jazz tunes, and Luberecki’s rendition is stellar.This month’s mix features the return of a couple of Trail Mix favorites, including banjo savant Danny Barnes, and Guy Clark, one of my favorite songwriters, who passed away last year. This month, Dualtone is releasing a compilation of Clark’s best recordings during his time with the label. Showcased on the mix is an intimate, previously unreleased demo of “Just To Watch Maria Dance.”Dig deep into this month’s mix and check out brand new tunes from Toma, Cindy Lee Berryhill, The Kernal, Will Johnson, Fort Defiance, Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors, Bill Scorzari, Curse Of Lono, Rose Cousins, Sunny Sweeney, Taarka, The Cairo Gang, and Natalie Cressman.Lots of great stuff in store on the Trail Mix blog this month, too. Be looking for chats with Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band, Ha Ha Tonka, Ryan Montbleau, and a visit to the Carter Family Fold in Hiltons, Virginia.And, of course, my monthly plea . . . . get out and buy some of this music. Go see these artists when they come through town. Visit your local record shop and grab a disc or two. These fabulous artists would appreciate it.You can download this March edition of Trail Mix here. Bright Side Ryan Montbleau What Can You Do? The Cairo Gang 5:01 Athena Taarka 4:01 3:12 3:25 Audio PlayerCindy Lee BerryhillAmerican CinematographyUse Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.00:000:00 / 3:23 2:13 3:13 4:03 A Thousand Million Reasons Colin Hay Fight for Love Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors 3:08 3:39 3:49 3:48 Radio Silence Natalie Cressmanlast_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , .

Trail Mix – The Maggie Valley Band

Posted on by

first_imgBeing in a touring band can make one pine for home.Good remedy for that? Name your band after your hometown and bring those good feelings and memories on the road with you.That’s exactly what Caroline and Whitney Miller, the sister duo behind Western North Carolina’s Maggie Valley Band, have done. The sisters took the name of their hometown for their band and, after being raised in a house full of music after dabbling with busking, have hit the road.The Maggie Valley Band recently released their debut record, The Hardest Thing, which features harmonies that only sisters can make together and noted guitarist and songwriter David Mayfield in the production booth.I recently touched based with the Miller sisters to chat about the new record, working with Mayfield, and the best things about their hometown.BRO – Let’s go opposite the record title. What’s the easiest thing about making music with your sister?CM – When it comes to the actual music, we never disagree. It’s incredible we don’t have differing opinions on whether it should be softer of more aggressive. She’s my best friend, she’s the only one I don’t have to impress or fear losing.WM – She’s always got my back on stage! We both have the same passion and same level of commitment. I never have to second guess her commitment and work ethic for the band. It really helps to have the same philosophy.BRO – I am very familiar with David Mayfield as a songwriter and a performer. How was it working with him as a producer?WM – It was absolutely amazing. He had so many great ideas, but he was always careful to make sure we got our say on it. The entire time we were recording was so much fun and such a positive experience. I don’t think there is a nicer or more humble person out there.BRO – Favorite sister band?CM – Rising Appalachia.WM – The Lewis Family comes to mind.BRO – “The Hardest Thing” is a featured track on this month’s Trail Mix. What’s the story behind the song?WM – Well, it definitely started with a relationship I hated to see go, but it’s about doing the right thing even when it’s hardest. That might be leaving a relationship, depending on the level of commitment or if it’s truly the best for someone, or retiring from a career if it’s the right time. Sometimes, doing the right thing has no immediate pay off until so much later and it’s hard to see.BRO – I love it when a band pays homage to its hometown in the band’s name. If I end up in Maggie Valley, where is my can’t miss/have to visit spot?CM – Thanks so much. We wanted to give back to the valley that raised us. We’ve lost a lot in the valley in the last couple of years, but for me it would be Raymond Fairchild’s Maggie Valley Opry. Where else can you pay $5 and see a national banjo champion four times a week?WM – Yes, and I would add The Stompin’ Ground to join in on the clogging tradition. It opened in 1982 and has held square dances about every weekend since.Caroline and Whitney have a pretty quiet tour schedule for the rest of February, but they will be all over North Carolina come March. For more information on the band, the new record, or when they will hit a stage near you, please check out the band’s website.Be sure to check out “The Hardest Thing,” along with tunes from Caleb Caudle, Morgan Wade & The Stepbrothers, The Oh Hellos, and many more on this month’s Trail Mix.last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , .