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Mister F Shares “Everything You Say” Video With Supercut From February Tour

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first_imgAlbany, NY group Mister F has released a new video for their song “Everything You Say,” a selection off of 2014 album The F Stands Four. This latest video from the prog-fusion quartet is a supercut edited together from live footage of their shows – a single ‘FauxPro’ camera placed differently each night – throughout their 15 shows this past February. The live audio source is a multitrack recording from their show at Aisle 5 in Atlanta, GA on February 12th, 2017, provided by Ben Gartenstein.The full recording of that show can also be streamed below.Mister F has been challenging themselves by committing to learning a different TV show theme for every show this year, and opening their set with it in an effort to encourage people to come out early and see what potentially beloved or recognizable theme song they’ll open with next. They have so far covered favorites such as That 70’s Show, The Office, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, The Walking Dead, Trailer Park Boys, X-Men, and many more.You can catch the band on tour supporting Fort Wayne, IN-based progressive rock jam band Earphorik in the Midwest over the next two weeks, as well as a support slot for Kung Fu at Buffalo Iron Works on 3/22, and in the Northeast during the weeks ahead. Keep track of all their upcoming dates on their official website, and see the poster below.Mister F is comprised of Scott Hannay (keyboards/vocals), brothers Matt (drums/lead vocals on this song) and Ben (bass) Pickering, and Colin Shore (guitar/vocals).last_img read more

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PREMIERE: MLIMA Shows Off Their Patented Mountain Groove On Disco-Funk Single “Sunshine”

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first_imgEmerging from Denver, Colorado, rising funk-jam-rock ensemble MLIMA (pronounced-Mmm-Lee-Ma) has established itself at the forefront of the ever-emerging music scene of the Rocky Mountains. “MLIMA” is the Swahili word for Mountain, and the music has been referred to as “Mountain Groove.” Since their conception in 2012, the 6-piece has built a local fan-base through a relentless live schedule including headlining Denver’s Bluebird Theatre and Boulder’s Fiske Planetarium. MLIMA played the main stage at Arise Music Festival 2016, and the group has opened for well-known live acts like Shpongle and The Disco Biscuits at Colorado’s Red Rocks Amphitheater, as well as Praang (members of SCI), Nigel Hall (Lettuce), and more.This coming September, MLIMA will release a new EP, comprised of  7 tracks worth of original music written, recorded, and produced by the band. The album features the core band roster (comprised of vocalist Jessica Jones, saxophonist and vocalist Zach Simms, guitarist Jeph Kennedy, bassist Ryan Thrush, percussionist Jack Breitenbach, and drummer Lance Croucher) as well as Ben Rafferty on keyboards. The new MLIMA EP has been over a year in the making, featuring a unique style and sound that incorporates roots in funk, rock, jazz, soul, Afro-beat, jam, and popular culture, and compels even the most stubborn of wallflowers to head to the dance floor and bust a move. Today, Live For Live Music is excited to debut the horn-driven disco-funk grooves of MLIMA’s new single from their forthcoming EP, “Sunshine.” Comments Simms of the track, “Let it grow. Like sunshine on the radio. A song about new love and new life. Remember that even with the fear and crippling self doubt, together we can make something beautiful. Let it grow.” Check it out below:MLIMA’s upcoming EP, due out September 29th as a self-release. This is the band’s first proper release. For more information on MLIMA, head to their website.MLIMA Tour:Aug. 11 – Boulder, CO – Be On Key ^Aug. 17 – Denver, CO – Your Mom’s HouseAug. 19 – Denver, CO – South by Southeast FestivalSep. 7 – Boulder, CO – Lazy DogSep. 10 – Guffey, CO – Black Mountain FestSep. 15 – Idaho Springs, CO – Tommyknocker BrewerySep. 21 – Denver, CO – Ophelia’s *Nov. 3 – Longmont, CO – Crossroads^ w/ Melvin Seals and JGB* notes Record Release Show[Photo Credit: Alan Westman]last_img read more

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Agreeing to disagree

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first_imgBreyer’s book examines how U.S. courts should respond to the new reality of interdependence that globalization has ushered into areas previously thought to be immune, like the law. He encourages judges to become more attuned to legal thinking outside the country and to be more considerate both of the implications of American legal decisions on foreign nations in areas like national security and trade, and of how such international experiences might inform better American legal decisions.Discussing his disagreement with Justice Clarence Thomas over whether it is appropriate for the U.S. Supreme Court to consider and cite decisions made by courts outside this country, Breyer said he understands Thomas’ view that measuring the United States against the standards of other nations ultimately undermines our sovereignty. “He sees this as protecting certain American values.”But unlike Europe, which has much more homogenous roots that can withstand a more narrowly tailored legal view, this “experiment” known as American democracy is best protected by drawing from a far wider scope of ideas, Breyer argued.“We are a very motley group of people, everybody under the sun,” he said. “The whole point of this thing is to say, ‘Please go look at what concretely this interdependence has meant for our institution and now make a decision: Tell me, isn’t it true, and I hope the answer would be yes, that … we are more likely to succeed and to continue to succeed with our experiment by paying a lot of attention — not just a little — to what goes on beyond our shores.’” <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lEX2Des_y_E” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/lEX2Des_y_E/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> A reflective Justice Breyer From the outside, it can look like life on the U.S. Supreme Court is little more than a succession of sour exchanges between ideological gladiators, a grind that’s more intellectual food fight than dispassionate debate.But for all of the tough talk and purple prose that can find its way into the court’s most closely watched 5-4 decisions, Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, LL.B ’64, says don’t mistake the rhetoric of political disagreement with personal animosity. This is not an angry bunch who can’t see straight enough to understand the arguments on both sides of an issue.“I’ve never heard one judge in that room say something really mean, even in a joking way, about another. It doesn’t happen. It’s professional,” Breyer told students during a talk at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) last Friday where he touched on landmark cases like Citizens United, the death penalty, and judicial sentencing reform. It’s only natural, he said, given the court’s complicated task interpreting the “borders” of important but frequently opaque areas of the Constitution like the First or 14th Amendments. “Of course, there are disagreements. Why shouldn’t there be disagreements?”Where court observers like to point to the dramatic, felicitous language of a Justice Antonin Scalia opinion, for example, as proof of smoldering hostilities on the bench, Breyer waved away that notion, saying Scalia just has a writer’s irresistible love for a good turn of phrase. “We all know that. We don’t mind. … That’s not a good reason to get angry at somebody personally if you’re sitting in my seat,” he said.A former professor at both HKS and Harvard Law School (HLS) between 1967 and 1994 before his nomination to the Supreme Court by President Bill Clinton in 1994, Breyer was at Harvard to discuss his new book, “The Court and the World: American Law and the New Global Realities,” with David Gergen, public service professor of public leadership and co-director of the Center for Public Leadership at HKS, and Nancy Gertner, a former U.S. District Court judge in Massachusetts and now a senior lecturer at HLS. Related Longtime jurist explains inner workings of Supreme Court Asked about his dissent in the Citizens United campaign-funding case, Breyer said the case was far tougher “than people give it credit for.” With no constitutional limit on free speech in politics, the case centered on what should be done about the average person who can only give a modest sum like $20 competing with those who can give $20 million for the attention of politicians and believing that the giver of $20 million will have more influence.“That’s a problem,” said Breyer. “I’ve said it’s a First Amendment problem because the purpose of the First Amendment, among other things, is to create a marketplace of ideas” by which the country’s founders meant “a public opinion that could actually have an influence on the policy that emerges from our elected institutions. There has to be a connection, that’s why [James] Madison and the others thought there would be such a connection. Now, when you have five people giving $20 million each or $2 million or $5 million … and you have hundreds of millions giving $10 each, it’s the big givers who will cut that connection. And even if it weren’t true, people would think it was true, and as long as they think it is true, there won’t be the necessary faith in that institution.”Asked by Gertner about his role in helping to set judicial sentencing guidelines in the 1980s, standards that have come under fire for being overly harsh and unfair, particularly to African-Americans, and that are now being reconsidered by Congress, Breyer defended the sentencing commission’s original intent, which was to close what had been a troubling variation between sentences handed down and the individual whims of judges. The guidelines were supposed to be just that, he said, not hard-and-fast rules that deliberately limited a judge’s discretion. But decades later, there’s rare bipartisan agreement that the guidelines created more problems than they solved.“This was meant to be a movement — not perfection — but a … move toward uniformity,” Breyer said. “If I had to do it over again, I think I’d do it. I understand it’s unpopular and I understand there are a lot of good criticisms, but I think I’d do it.”When a student asked whether there’s tension between the individual identity of the justices and their deliberations on cases, Breyer was characteristically even-handed.“I would say no in the sense that whether you are a Latina, whether you are a woman, whether you are an African-American [or] whatever, you have a case in front of you, and these are judges, and they’re going to try to get that case right. So, it’s in that sense, no,” he said.“Now, I’m from San Francisco. I have the background I’ve had. I have the life that I’ve had, and that has had a hand in shaping what I think of the [Constitution] and the way it relates to people in America and what our country’s about, which plays a role in interpreting many of these words — and so have the others. And because life experiences differ and because no two people are alike and because we’re not a group of computers, of course,” Breyer said with a mischievous laugh. “So I’m tempted to say, ‘absolutely not’ and ‘of course!’ ”last_img read more

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Propel software-defined network innovation with Open Networking

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first_img“The Path Is Open to Software-Defined Networking” provides more details about the customers’ solutions — including why they engaged Dell over the competition, what Open Networking technologies they’re using, and their business outcomes. Check out the eBook today.How are you using Dell Open Networking solutions to help make your business future ready? Or do you have any plans for implementing these technologies? As a product marketing manager who works on these solutions, I welcome your feedback and questions. Over the past few years, there has been much discussion about disaggregating networks in order to give organizations more choice in building the foundations needed for future-ready infrastructures. Traditional networks are struggling to support increases in traffic, devices and security risks. Upgrading networks to meet these challenges is difficult because traditional networks operate as technology silos that require proprietary hardware and software as well as rigid processes and specialized skill sets for systems administrators   In order to meet today’s rapidly evolving business challenges, organizations need more choice and control over their network infrastructure.The age of network innovation through disaggregation has arrived. This disaggregated networking model allows organizations to choose among various industry-standard networking switches, network applications and network operating systems to meet their specific business needs. The disaggregated networking model provides consistent computing and networking with a common deployment and operation model. Through this open networking approach, customers can realize lower operation and capital expenditures while simultaneously breaking free from vendor lock-in.By disaggregating the network customers can benefit from a more flexible platform that IT professionals control at every level. Organizations that want to implement a future-ready infrastructure should look closely at Dell, a leader in open systems.  IT departments can now run Linux on Dell switches and servers. Customers can also adopt software-defined networking (SDN) solutions with Dell technologies, And regardless of the requirements and the size of an organization, Dell provides innovative solutions and support services. Dell offers the largest set of Open Networking solutions available today with application specific integrated circuits (ASICs).Check out how leading edge IT departments are already using Dell Open Networking solutions to get results. Take a look at the new eBook called “The Path Is Open to Software-Defined Networking.” It shows how four different organizations are:Protecting investments with a highly flexible and scalable network that minimizes the need to replace hardware.Accelerating innovation velocity to create new services and automated processes quicker by simplifying network management.Increasing business agility to drive growth with a network that supports, rather than restricts, their vision.1)      By implementing SDN with a Dell Open Networking solution, Cornell UniversityIncreases researchers’ efficiency by 200% with accelerated data analysis and support for more concurrent workloads.Meets diverse user requirements with one network, including the need for different SDN controllers.Saves money by halving its network footprint, boosting the utilization of individual switches and automating tasks.2)     By deploying a software-defined data center that includes a Dell Open Networking solution, cloud services provider U2 Cloud:Improves customer experience by running workloads 300% faster and servicing change requests in minutes rather than weeks.Boosts ROI by supporting more than one virtual switch on a physical switch.3)     By replacing its traditional network with a Dell Open Networking solution, cloud service provider ICM Netsystems:Facilitates a 35% growth rate in business volume by accelerating client onboarding.Speeds network performance by 45% and IT staff efficiency by 20%.Fuels innovation by increasing network flexibility and simplifying development.4)     By deploying a private cloud that uses a Dell Open Networking solution, open-source developer Midokura:Increases efficiency by managing the network and servers with the same Linux commands.Improves user experience by enabling engineers to reconfigure virtual network resources to support changing demand.last_img read more

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Notre Dame students discuss stereotyping on campus

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first_imgMary Steurer | The Observer Several campus organizations sponsored a panel discussion Thursday evening titled “What Sport Do you Play?” Eric Love moderated the discussion between Khalid Kareem, Jalen Elliott and Trebor Goodall.Kareem said he had a similar experience when he was approached by a stranger in public.“This guy — I don’t believe it — he walks up to me and he says, ‘Me and my manager were trying to figure out what sport you play. Where are you at school?’” he said. “I was like, ‘I play football, I go to Notre Dame, but what made you think I play sports?’”Elliott said these judgements extend into the classroom, where his peers often underestimate student-athletes’ academic ability.“I definitely think that you do hear those — ‘Oh the curve’s going to be great, I heard the curve is good,’ and it’s kind of like, ‘Why is the curve going to be good?’” he said. “But I think it gives us a certain drive to kind of go and seek the help we have.”Elliott does not define himself as a football player, but rather as someone who strives for success in all areas of his life, he added.“Yes, it is because of football that I got here, but now that I’m here, I want to excel in everything I do,” he said. “And so, once I got here, it was important to me to work as hard as possible — not just in football, but academically as well.”Kareem called on the Notre Dame community to be more empathetic towards student-athletes and mindful of the pressures their work puts on them.“At times it feels like the student body kind of goes against you, but when we’re good, everybody’s crazy — just keep it consistent,” he said.A Gates Millennium scholar and a student manager for the Notre Dame athletics department, Goodall said he actively works to combat assumptions made about African-American students.“Just me constantly being involved on campus and letting them know that black men are more than just what we can contribute physically, I think I’ve been doing a great job at that,” he said.Elliott said that encouraging conversation between student-athletes and non-athletes will help combat these stereotypes.“I think the biggest thing on just on both sides is just being there to talk to one another,” Elliot said. “ … Just because you never know if someone really might want to get to know you as a person.”Being inclusive towards students-athletes is another way to bridge the divide, Goodall said.“One of the things that I’ve tried to stay consistent in doing these four years is not assuming that the athletes don’t have time to come to stuff,” he said. “… Don’t be afraid to invite them to things, don’t be afraid to talk to them.”“[There’s] more to us than just football,” Kareem echoed. “We have so much more to offer besides that if you take the time to get to know us.”Tags: Black Student Association, sports, Walk the Walk Week, What sport do you play Members of the Notre Dame community came together to discuss the stereotyping of African-American students in a panel discussion titled “What Sport Do You Play?” in Visitation Hall. A part of Walk the Walk Week, the event was sponsored by student government, the Alliance for Catholic Education and several other campus organizations.Panelists included senior Trebor Goodall, president of the Notre Dame Black Student Association and Notre Dame football players senior Khalid Kareem and junior Jalen Elliott.The panel was moderated by Eric Love, director of staff diversity and inclusion.Love began the discussion by asking the panelists to think of a moment when others have made assumptions about them.Goodall recalled the first time he met his freshman year roommate.“His parents asked me, ‘Just curious, are you on scholarship or are you a student athlete here?’ And I was like, ‘No, I just came here to do school,’” he said.last_img read more

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Tanya Saracho’s Mala Hierba Opens Off-Broadway

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first_img Mala Hierba will run through August 10 as part of Second Stage’s twelfth annual Uptown Series. Mala Hierba celebrates its off-Broadway opening on July 28. The New York premiere stars Marta Milans, Roberta Colindrez, Sandra Marquez and Ana Nogueira. Jerry Ruiz directs the production at the McGinn/Cazale Theatre. Written by Tanya Saracho, the play follows Liliana (Milans), a seemingly impeccable trophy wife of a border magnate living in Texas. But beneath her polished exterior lies a fierce determination to survive at any cost. When her true desires break the surface, she is forced to decide between obligation and the price of freedom.center_img View Commentslast_img

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Best Strength Building Exercises for Every Sport

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first_imgAdventure sports like running, hiking, and biking demand such high levels of endurance that athletes tend to forget about training for strength building exercises. “Most riders think they have to put in more time on the bike to get faster, but incorporating strength training will deliver greater results,” says pro mountain bike trainer James Wilson. Wilson, who trains downhill pros, singlespeed champions, and back of the packers alike, developed the MTB Strength Training System, a guide for bikers that puts an emphasis on full-body strength building exercises. “Strength equals technical ability on a bike, pure and simple,” Wilson says.Most pro coaches from all endurance sports now incorporate strength training in their athletes’ routines. We’ve found some of the best strength training exercises geared to specific adventure athletes. Use the plan below to get stronger for your favorite sport, or combine the exercises for a full body shake down.THE RUNNERSingle-leg squats: Bend your right knee slightly and raise your left foot off the ground in front of you so you’re standing only on your right leg. Bend your leg, trying to keep your back straight and left foot in front of you, so you drop into a squat. Go as low as you can, and return to a standing position. Repeat 10 times with each leg. Works: Quads and glutes“Some runners overlook strength training,” says running coach Jennifer Gill. “But strength training prevents injuries by providing running economy and keeping your form true when you get tired.”Side Plank: From a push up position, pull your right hand off the ground while twisting your torso, and extend your right arm perpendicular to your body. Your entire body should be supported by your left arm and left leg. Keep your torso straight. Hold for 10 seconds and repeat on the other side. Works: abs, lower back, shoulders THE BIKERBulgarian Squats: Rest the top of your foot on a bench behind you, your other foot stretched in front of you. Drop down so your back knee touches the ground, then explode back up. That’s one rep. Do ten on each side and repeat. Works: Quads, calves, and hips Split Squats: Holding light dumbbells in each hand, stand with your feet split wide, one in front, one in back. Bend your front knee, lowering your body toward the ground, keeping your spine straight, and the heel of your front foot planted on the ground. When your back knee touches the ground, rise up. That’s one rep. Do 20 reps, then switch your front foot and do 20 more. Works: Quads, glutes, coreTHE PADDLERBoat Pose: Sit on the floor holding a rock or weight away from your chest. Lean back and raise your legs so your entire body is balanced on your sitting bones (your body should look like the bottom of a boat). Holding this pose alone should activate your core. Next, rotate the weight to your right side, trying to touch it to the ground. Then rotate left. That’s one rep. Do 15, rest, and do 15 more. Works: Core and shoulders Side Press: Standing straight, with a dumbbell in each hand resting at your shoulders, bend your upper body to the left while pushing your right hip out. At the same time, press the right dumbbell toward the ceiling. Lower and return to an erect position. That’s one rep. Do ten on each side, rest, and do ten more.Works: Core and shoulders THE CLIMBERAngled Pole Climb: On a playground, sit at the base of an angled swingset pole. Wrap your ankles around the base of the pole and grip the pole with your hands at eye level. Pull yourself to the top, then lower back down. Do 5 repeats. Works: Core and shoulders, back, handsSwingset Push Ups: On the same playground, get in a push-up position with your toes resting on the seat of a swing. Do a push up, then pull your knees into your chest, hold, then extend them again. That’s one rep. Do 10 reps, rest, then do 10 more. Works: Chest, core, shoulders, hipsELEMENTARY SCHOOL WORKOUTWant to see serious gains in your endurance and strength and have fun in the process? Work out like an eight-year-old. Some of the classic gym-class exercises you dreaded as a kid employ key principles of functional fitness.“The older you are, the better your school PE was,” says Dan MacDougald, owner of Crossfit Atlanta. Crossfit training uses a variety of basic movements, many of which are familiar to athletes from their school days. “There’s a lot of worth to the exercises we used to do in PE. Physical education has been dumbed down in recent years, but at one time, kids got a good workout.”Try these three “old school” exercises for a full body shakedown.Rope ClimbThe dreaded rope climb engages all of the workhorse muscles in your upper body, and builds muscle endurance as well as strength, which is key in succeeding at adventure sports like climbing, paddling, and mountain biking. Try five rope repeats, and gradually rely less on your legs to move up the rope. Can’t find a gym rope? Climb a tree instead.Jumping Rope10 minutes of jumping rope will burn as many calories as jogging for 10 minutes at eight-minutes-per-mile pace. For a simple workout, try jump intervals. Jump as many times as you can in 30 seconds, then rest for 30. Next, jump swinging the rope backwards for 30 seconds, and rest for 30. Do 10 minutes of intervals and build from there.Shuttle RunThis gym-class staple builds speed, agility, and endurance. Place two blocks (in school we used erasers) or rocks 30 feet from your starting point. Sprint from the starting line to the first block, pick it up and sprint back to the line, set the block down and sprint back to the second block, picking it up and sprinting back to the start. Time yourself. In 1985, an eight-year-old had to finish the run in 11.1 seconds to be considered for the Presidential Fitness Award.last_img read more

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Legends of Ohiopyle

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first_imgNestled among the rugged Laurel Highlands of Pennsylvania lies an old logging town with an international renown that far outweighs its scant population of 59.That town is Ohiopyle, a sleepy little place with a few old buildings and one main road that runs through town uninterrupted by stop sign or traffic light. But what it lacks in appearances it makes up for in one thing. Whitewater.Picture this: a one-mile class III “Loop” on the Lower Youghiogheny (Yough) in your front yard, the natural bend of the river making a shuttle unnecessary; a half-hour-drive to the put-in of the class IV+ Upper Yough; another 45-minute drive to any of the Yough’s steep class V tributaries along with countless other runs in the area like Big Sandy and the Cheat River Canyon; and, of course, a killer Thursday night yoga class by Yogi Wade paired with brews, foods, and tunes at the local Falls City Pub. That sleepy little town doesn’t seem so drowsy anymore, right?It’s a diamond in the rough no doubt, yet one whose reputation for world-class whitewater, and whitewater paddlers, is incomparable. Rewind 30-some years to the late ‘70s and ‘80s, to an era that saw the rebirthing of whitewater paddling and a boom in the industry right on the waters of the Yough. Whether raft guide, entrepreneur, or downright gutsy kayaker, you can’t tell the history of paddling in the ‘Pyle without mentioning the following five individuals.ERIC MARTINOwner •Wilderness VoyageursEric Martin never anticipated taking over the family rafting business. His father, Lance Martin, had started one of the first rafting companies in Ohiopyle, Wilderness Voyageurs, with his wife in 1964. Although Martin worked for his parents during the season, in his eyes, that job was merely a means to an end.“I worked as a raft guide to earn money to go kayaking somewhere else,” Martin says. “I was on the water twice a day, every day, year-round.”Inspired by other world-class kayakers like Jon Lugbill and Kent Ford who also frequented the Yough, Martin took his passion for paddling to a competitive level. In 1983, he began slalom racing and would continue to do so for over a decade, placing second in the junior world championships and making it all the way to the team trials for the Olympic games in 1996.“There were no boat companies sponsoring athletes in the ‘70s and ‘80s,” Martin recalls, “but when you’re talking and paddling with U.S. team members who are traveling around the world going kayaking, that seems like a pretty good idea at 14 years old.”But, as life would have it, the year 1991 saw a turn of events that sent Martin from his competitive tour around the world back to his hometown to take over Wilderness Voyageurs. Martin has kept the business going strong and the company is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, making it the oldest rafting outfitter in the East. Although Martin no longer has the flexibility to get out on the water “twice a day, every day, year round,” the outfitter is conveniently located across the train tracks from the Lower Yough take-out.“We’re in the crucible of whitewater in this country,” Martin says. “Whether it’s a flatwater workout or ramping it up and running class Vs, it’s all available. That’s a lot of quality of life right there.”KARA WELDCo-owner •Immersion ResearchAlthough Kara Weld grew up on the banks of the Yough, she was born and raised not in Ohiopyle but in Confluence, just a short 30-minute drive over the mountain. Her father was an avid outdoorsman, and together, the two learned to kayak.“We were the biggest geeks on the river,” Weld remembers. “I’m pretty sure I had a big football helmet on.”As Weld grew older, so too did her love of kayaking. Although Ohiopyle had a crew of older guys who paddled daily, Weld was just a kid still. More than that, Weld was a girl, and women paddlers in the ‘80s were far and few between. When a new kayaking school opened in town and the owner started a kid’s group, Weld immediately signed up. In less than a year, she was racing at her first slalom event.From the Lower Yough to the Ocoee River, Weld was on the water nearly every weekend, either training or competing. In 1984, Weld earned a spot on the U.S. junior team, which launched her kayaking career. Suddenly she was no longer dinking around on the Middle Yough with her dad and her beater gear; she was paddling some of the most difficult runs in the world.“I think I swam in every country I visited,” Weld says. “I was very timid in harder whitewater.”Keep in mind that Weld was just a teenager at the time. Eventually, she would move up the ranks, becoming a three-time U.S. National Women’s Champion who competed on the U.S. team for 20 years. In 1995 she married her husband John and two years later, made the decision to quit the competition scene. That same year, Weld returned to her hometown of Confluence to embark on a new adventure.“My husband said, ‘We should make kayaking gear.’ I told him, ‘You’re insane.’”Thus Immersion Research (IR) was born, a kayaking gear manufacturer based out of Confluence that made its splash onto the marketplace by making rash guards and surf trunks, the labor taking place in the Weld family basement. Now, IR produces everything from base layers to dry suits, a staple brand among Ohiopyle’s many raft guides and paddlers.JESS WHITTEMOREChief engineer • Immersion Research“It was like a renaissance of kayaking.”That’s how Jess Whittemore describes the whitewater scene in Ohiopyle during the late ‘70s and early ‘80s, a time of change and innovation, when awkwardly long composite boats were the industry standard and the slickest, sickest moves entailed twirling your paddle around your neck. For Whittemore, who moved to the area from Albright, W.Va., to raft guide for another outfitter in town, the ‘80s in particular brought about one of the greatest changes of all, a development he was largely responsible for: the introduction of three-dimensional boating.“I discovered pillow squirting and blasting holes and it really revolutionized the sport,” Whittemore says. “It eventually turned into present-day play boating and it’s fantastic what they’re doing now, things I never dreamed of.”With fellow paddler and friend Jon Lugbill, Whittemore continued to challenge himself to invent different moves. As he continued to push, he began to tap into the currents that not only flow on the water’s surface but also beneath and around the features. In opening up this entirely unexplored realm of possibilities, Whittemore realized that the boat styles at that time could not perform the moves he knew were possible.“I designed my first kayak right there in the garage,” Whittemore says. “I called it the Millennium Falcon. It was the first squirt boat really, although I didn’t know it then.”Whittemore was one of a few other paddlers in town who were beginning to design their own boats, the most prominent of those being Jim Snyder who began specifically crafting squirt boats. Whittemore continued to build boats throughout his paddling career, working in the shop when he wasn’t on the water.“I was the quintessential kayak bum,” he says. “I was so busy barely making money by making boats that my full and complete attention was really just to be a great kayaker.”Whittemore eventually took his creative outlet to Immersion Research where he continues to work as the chief engineer. He designs everything from dry tops to spray skirts, and although his paddling heyday has simmered down a bit, he remains active in the paddling community by fighting for recreational boating dam releases in the area.PHIL COLEMANRaft guide • Wilderness VoyageursAlthough the commercial rafting scene in Ohiopyle mostly centers on running the Yough and the nearby Cheat River Canyon, a select few of the area’s boaters in the late 1970s were hungry for more. Phil Coleman was at the forefront of that group, a raft guide by day and kayaker by night.“There were a lot of egos flying around back then,” Coleman says. “The highest concentration of kayakers pushing the envelope in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s were located in Ohiopyle. The sport was going through a true revolution.”Like most paddlers in town, Coleman was on the water nearly every day and had been raft guiding for the local outfitters since high school. He joined names like Dean Tomko, Roger Zbel, and the Snyder brothers on the water, and soon Coleman was part of an elite paddling posse that was running some of the steepest creeks around. In 1978, Coleman, accompanied by Jim Snyder and Mike Fentress, set a record in the paddling community, knocking off a first descent of the infamous Quarry Run.“There were lots of smash ups and pins and broken boats and near close calls, but that was definitely one of my greater accomplishments at the time,” Coleman says, failing to mention that he was the near close call. Now, over 30 years since that record-setting first descent, Coleman is still an active boater and member of the paddling community.“Maybe something’s wrong with me, but I love it. It’s just plain fun,” he says.Coleman splits his time between Albright, W.Va., Ohiopyle, Penn., and Costa Rica so that he can be on or around the water year-round. In Costa Rica, he started his own eco-tourism adventure outfitter called RainForest World and regularly guides tourists down everything from class IV+ whitewater to scenic float trips.TOM LOVEOwner • Airtight InflatablesIf you don’t know who Tom Love is, you’ve likely seen boaters taking his brainchild down rivers around the world, or maybe you even own one yourself. The shredder, an inflatable river craft, was one of those inventions that came out of that whitewater renaissance of the ‘80s. Prior to crafting the shredder, Love had not only been an avid paddler and raft guide, but also a boat repairman.“For awhile, every company that built boats had me as their warranty center,” Love says. “Finally I said, ‘Well gee whiz, these people are building screwed-up boats. I can screw up boats just as easy as they can.’”In 1978, Love quit the business of repairing other companies’ boats to focus his energy on crafting his own line of inflatable rafts. Already an iconic figure in the rafting industry around Ohiopyle, Love was easily able to strike deals with local outfitters and made just enough money to continue experimenting with boat designs while supporting himself. The idea for the shredder came about in the mid-1980s when a friend of Love came to him with a request. He needed a boat that was faster than traditional rafts so he could get ahead of commercial trips and shoot video, the early predecessor of a video boater.“If not for huge video cameras, these shredders would have never been built,” Love says.That first prototype looks much like the present-day shredder, and it wasn’t long before Love abandoned producing traditional oval rafts to exclusively making shredders.“For a while I was only making demos, but I kept selling the sons-o’-bitches,” he says, a testament to the cutting-edge-inflatable’s increasing popularity. Since then, other raft manufacturing companies have tried their hand at producing similar crafts; however, Love’s base in Ohiopyle and his connections in the region ensure that the shredder craze will live on.last_img read more

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Argentina and Chile Reaffirm Joint Security and Defense Cooperation Agreement

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first_imgBy Francisco Pereira/Diálogo December 01, 2016 Chilean Foreign Minister Heraldo Muñoz Valenzuela, Argentine Foreign Minister Susana Malcorra, Chilean Defense Minister José Antonio Gómez Urrutia, and Argentine Defense Minister Julio César Martinez attended the Mechanism 2+2 meeting, a traditional gathering between the two countries, in the Green Room of the San Martín Palace in Buenos Aires, Argentina on November 4th. Participants focused on several topics of mutual interest, such as their participation in the South American Defense Council (CDS, per its Spanish acronym), an organ of the Union of South American Nations, and on the Conference of Defense Ministers of the Americas (CMDA, per its Spanish acronym). South American Defense Council “Strengthening the South American Defense Council allows for transparency and for working on various issues of relevance to the region,” said Minister Gómez in reference to Chile’s interest in the CDS. “Therefore, I think we need to play a more prominent role in this matter.” The CDS was created in 2008 and comprises South America’s 12 countries. The goal is to make South America a peaceful region, create conditions for political stability and socio-economic development, and build a South American defense identity. It also aims to foster consensus to contribute to strengthening cooperation around the continent. Conference of Defense Ministers of the Americas During the discussion regarding the results of the October CMDA meeting in Trinidad and Tobago, Minister Gómez explained that the subject of operations tied to natural disasters was one of the topics discussed, including the intense seismic activity that stroke Chile at the time, injuring people and damaging property throughout the country. On that occasion, a working group was established with representatives from both South American countries – Chile being the main driver of this initiative – because “we have experience with different natural disasters, and, therefore, we can work together on this and make a valuable contribution,” said Minister Gómez. Security and defense cooperation and other topics Marcos Robledo, Chile’s undersecretary of Defense, spoke of his country’s participation in the United Nation’s Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic and highlighted the relationship Chile has with Argentina. “The relationship that we have been reaffirming with Argentina by way of defense is quite interesting; this is a permanent and ongoing effort on matters that are of benefit to the citizenry.” Regarding the area of bilateral security and defense cooperation, the representatives showed a willingness to continue and even expand a series of projects that both countries are developing jointly among their navies, armies, and air forces. Participants also discussed cooperation in other mutual areas, such as science, military equipment technology and development, the Antarctic, gender and military issues, as well as risk management, among others. A topic of much discussion was the inclusion of UN Resolution 1325, which requires women’s rights to be respected in order to support their involvement in post-conflict peace negotiations. Both countries pledged to present a plan to incorporate the resolution at the ministers’ meeting to be held in Buenos Aires on December 15th-16th. The initial plan calls for the use of the Combined Peace Force “Southern Cross” as the baseline for the incorporation of the resolution. Colombia’s peace process was also discussed, with both chancellors pledging to remain involved as observers in the United Nations Special Political Mission in the Republic of Colombia. “The forum is of great relevance because we have an extensive agenda with Chile on very important projects and operations in the area of defense, since we share such a long border,” said Argentine Minister Martinez. “All the work that we are doing in the mutual area of natural disasters and peacekeeping operations around the world is essential,” he added. Cooperation between Argentina and Chile dates back a long time, and it is undoubtedly an example of diplomatic success between two partner nations that have resolved past conflicts and territorial disputes along their extensive borders. Since the 2009 signing of the Maipú Treaty, these meetings have become a tradition between these two neighbors. The treaty aims to deepen the level of bilateral cooperation in different areas, and these binational meetings of ministers are essential for achieving those goals. Seven meetings have been held in this format. In 2015, during the 7th Bi-national Meeting of Ministers in Santiago, defense authorities from both nations signed a joint declaration on their 2015 Bilateral Action Plan, which includes 12 commitments that will allow them to focus their efforts in the defense sector.last_img read more

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Court rules against Barry U.

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first_img June 1, 2002 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular News Court rules against Barry U. 111 graduates denied chance to become Florida lawyers Court rules against Barry U. Associate Editor Refusing to second-guess the ABA or bend the Rules Relating to Admissions to the Bar, the Florida Supreme Court denied Barry University School of Law’s petition to release exam results impounded during a protracted ABA accreditation process.The May 16 ruling dealt a devastating blow to 111 Barry law students who graduated in January, June, and July 2000 and January 2001 — more than 12 months earlier than the ABA’s February 4, 2002, decision to grant Barry provisional accreditation, and therefore in violation of Rule 2-11.1.Barry law school Dean Stanley Talcott said he is working with ABA officials to see what help, if any, the school can offer graduates caught in legal career limbo with a legal education but no way to practice law in Florida.“I’m disappointed, indescribably so, dejected, and all of the other adjectives. And surprised, quite frankly, given the Supreme Court had accommodated the situation previously during the process,” said Scott Blaue, who graduated third in his class, served as editor-in-chief of law review, and took the bar exam in July 2000 only to have the results impounded forever.The 35-year-old husband and father of three works as a law clerk while he dreams of being a licensed lawyer some day. He is also a plaintiff in a federal lawsuit against the ABA, challenging the fairness of the accreditation process.The pending lawsuit, he said wryly, “was certainly not mooted by this decision.”In Barry’s petition, Holland & Knight lawyers former Justice Stephen H. Grimes and Lucinda A. Hofmann noted the human price with budding legal careers hanging in the balance:“If this court does not grant the requested relief, 111 graduates of a currently accredited law school will not be permitted to practice in Florida. At best, these graduates can sit for the bar examination in a state that does not require graduation from an ABA accredited law school, practice there for 10 years, and then, if still desirous of practicing in Florida, seek admission under Rule 2-11.2.”But the court showed little sympathy for affected Barry graduates, stressing the rule is the rule, and the rule is clear.“We note that all students who enrolled at Barry University while it was unaccredited were on notice of the risk in attending an unaccredited law school when they began their studies at Barry University. Furthermore, each of our prior orders allowing Barry University students to sit for the bar exam was contingent on the law school obtaining provisional accreditation within 12 months of these students’ graduations,” said the unanimous court decision in Case No. SC02-740 (with Justice R. Fred Lewis recused).The court held firm to enforcing Rule 2-11.1, which requires that graduation occur within 12 months of accreditation. Barry had argued that the fairest date to start that clock ticking is the fall of 2000, when Barry received a favorable site visit that became the later basis for ABA accreditation. But the Florida Board of Bar Examiners countered that the 12-month rule is set by the actual February 2002 ABA accreditation decision and adhering to that rule is important in maintaining a consistent and fair process.In its petition, Barry insisted it was not asking for a waiver of the rules.But the high court disagreed.“A waiver is essentially what Barry University is asking this court to provide by allowing those students who graduated more than 12 months before the time that actual accreditation was granted to be considered for admission to The Florida Bar. Further, although Barry University claims that it is not asking this court to ‘second-guess the ABA or to determine that it erred,’ in fact by its request, Barry University would have this court go behind the ABA’s multitiered process of decision making and reach a determination that the ABA erred by not granting provisional accreditation in February 2001. Barry University’s request would have this court return to its pre- Hale [ Florida Board of Bar Examiners In re Hale, 433 So. 2d 969, 971 (Fla. 1983)] days where the court granted and denied waivers on a case-by-case basis.”As director of institutional advancement at Barry law school, it was Eric DuBois’s job to deliver a copy of the order to Dean Talcott and other school officials as soon as the May 16 opinion was released.“Their reaction was devastation,” said DuBois, who took the news personally as a June 2000 Barry law graduate with $100,000 racked up in student loans.“The hardest part as an alum is here I sat next to a lot of the students who are OK to take the bar exam, and studied with them for exams. The only difference was they took one class, or turned in a paper, after I did. And they can practice law and I can’t,” DuBois said.“It kind of makes me wonder if I want to join the Bar knowing that as a graduate of this school, we weren’t wanted. If you want us, want us. I did everything I thought I was supposed to do. I applied for the bar exam, I did my education in four years. And I would put the education I received up against any other school in the state.”Dean Talcott said he feels graduates’ pain and wants to see what he can do to help.“An awful lot right now is restricted to efforts to find out what options are available that are within the ability of the school to do without bringing jeopardy to any other parts of the school’s mission,” Talcott said.While Barry’s lawyers have asked the Supreme Court for a rehearing, Talcott said he is carefully reviewing with ABA officials options for assisting affected graduates that would be in full accordance with standards and sound education principles, including:• Allow graduates to come back to Barry law school and they won’t be charged as much for tuition.• Fast-track graduates with an advance standing to recover degrees by taking upper-level courses.“In a way, that could be a win-win situation for us,” Talcott said, explaining qualified graduates, many with experience working as law clerks, could serve as valuable mentors to first-year law students and ratchet up scholarly discussions in classes.“But obviously, it is more time and effort for people who have already gone through the program,” he added.Talcott said he was disappointed by the court’s ruling, but not surprised.“I have practiced law for 30 years, and if I’ve learned nothing else, it is in the nature of every case that it can be decided several ways, and you will not always get the outcome you would hope for. Surprise is never a term that applies,” Talcott said.“But that sad feeling for the people affected, no matter how long you practice, that never goes away.”last_img read more

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