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Richard Clarke: Cyberwar threat demands U.S. defense strategy

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first_img Read Full Story Security expert Richard A. Clarke offers stark examples in arguing that the threats of cyberwar and cyberespionage are not just science fiction hype:–Israeli F15 and F16s screamed across the Syrian border in September 2007 and bombed a nuclear reactor construction site, but Syrian radar screens showed nothing but peaceful green. The Israelis had hacked into the Syrian air defense and seized control of the software system.–British intelligence told the top chief executives in the country: Assume that your corporation has been hacked, and that all of your vital information, all your intellectual property, all your research and development has been stolen.–The Pentagon acknowledged in August that the secret American SIPRNet defense network was hacked two years earlier by a foreign intelligence service using the Internet.Clarke has been a principal US government security strategist, serving as security and counterterrorism adviser to Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush before and after the 9/11 attacks. Introducing Clarke at a seminar at Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, director Graham Allison noted that Clarke was the only government official to apologize to the American people after the attacks, telling the 9/11 commission, “Your government has failed you.”Yet Allison said Clarke himself was one of the most effective players within the government in recognizing and addressing the growing threat of catastrophic terrorism. And when Clarke left government in 2003, he wrote what Allison called the best book on the war on terrorism, “Against All Enemies.”Clarke, a faculty affiliate in the Belfer Center, is now working to focus attention on another threat that could pose equally grave challenges to the nation’s security. Clarke has co-authored a new book, “Cyberwar: the Next Threat to National Security and What to Do About It.” He briefed a directors’ seminar at the Belfer Center on Sept. 14 about the risks of cyber attacks, and suggested ways for the United States to develop a credible defensive strategy against cyber threats.Clarke, who is a partner of Good Harbor Consulting, a security and risk consulting firm, surveyed the range of cyber risks in crime, espionage and warfare in his on-the-record introductory remarks. He called cyberterrorism a comparatively minor threat, saying terrorists have shown little capacity to use the Internet for anything other than propaganda. And Clarke said that cybercrime, while costly to the economy and to financial institutions, tended to involve stealing small amounts of money from lots of people.Cyberespionage is more serious and immediate, he said, threatening not only governments but also businesses. But the prospect of cyberwar, Clarke said, poses especially  serious threats that have not received the national or international focus that they deserve.The Belfer Center site has this video of Clarke’s opening remarks as well as a full transcript.last_img read more

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Rolling back school lunch nutrition standards a bad idea

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first_img Read Full Story Congressional efforts to undermine school lunch nutrition standards implemented in 2012 could threaten progress in the fight against childhood obesity, according to an opinion piece in the October 29, 2014 New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).Critics of the standards, including some school officials and food-industry advocates, have raised concerns about increased food waste, decreased school-lunch participation, difficulties in meeting whole-grain and sodium goals, and potential for increased operating costs. But the authors of the NEJM article addressed these claims and stressed the importance of maintaining the current standards, which require more servings of fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and less calories, trans fats and sodium in school lunches.“The School Lunch Program provides meals to more than 30 million students a day, and few other programs that can protect against obesity and chronic diseases have such broad reach,” said co-author Elsie Taveras, associate professor in the Department of Nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and chief of general pediatrics at MassGeneral Hospital (MGH) for Children, in an MGH press release. “The recent politicization of the program and attempts to roll back the improvements that have been made represent to us — as pediatricians and public health practitioners — a threat to children’s health, development and academic success.”last_img read more

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Invisible Illness Awareness Day panel debunks ailment stereotypes

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first_imgA group of Notre Dame students officially known as “the Invisilillies” conducted a panel recognizing the University’s first “Invisible Illness Awareness Day.”The panelists described how these ailments affect their daily lives and debunked the myths associated with the appearance of being sick.Senior Francie Fitzgerald was diagnosed with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) — an autoimmune disease that causes her body’s immune system to attack healthy cells — as a sophomore in high school. One of the disease’s many symptoms is compromised blood and oxygen flow to her brain and extremities.Because of this problem, Fitzgerald said, “many POTS patients pass out each time they speak,” and the array of challenges Fitzgerald’s condition has caused led to her getting a service dog named Paddy in her sophomore year at Notre Dame to assist her in her daily life.Each panelist acknowledged a myth or stereotype of invisible illness they proved wrong. One thing common misconception Fitzgerald cited is that because she looks healthy, her “dog must be a comfort animal or psychiatric service dog.” Those kinds of service dogs play important roles too, Fitzgerald said, but this comment causes people to overlook her illness because it is not visible.Senior Lauren Janek has several invisible illnesses, including Crohn’s disease and fibromyalgia. For her and the other 12 Invisilillies, she said, hearing the statement “but you don’t look or act sick” has been frustrating.“What are sick people supposed to look like?” Janek said. “Most of the time when I’m not feeling well, it’s behind closed doors. So yes, we look perfectly fine when you see us in class or see us out, which is really confusing. This disease isn’t our defining characteristic, but it would be nice for people to know.”Diagnosed during the summer before her freshman year at Notre Dame, sophomore Rose Ashley has chronic fatigue syndrome and a rare disease called IGA Vasculitis, which causes bleeding beneath the skin as the body attacks small blood vessels. Ashley said people often contribute her fatigue to being a typical college student.“My exhaustion is debilitating; it’s not just something I can get over,” she said. “Yes, I’m a college student, and yes, I’m tired, but that is not necessarily a causal relationship.”Sophomore Claire Marks has endured similar criticism in dealing with her illness. Diagnosed with Fibromyalgia and Hypothyroidism at 15, Marks said, people often tell her she is “too young to be sick.”“Being told you don’t understand pain and you’re too young to be sick is really frustrating,” she said. “Just because an illness is invisible to everyone doesn’t mean it’s not there.”Senior Jackie Johnson suffers from cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease that causes a thick mucus buildup in the lungs and other organs. The effects of CF on her daily life include taking pills before meals and using a respiratory machine for an hour each day to clean her lungs. Because CF is a common genetic disease, Johnson said, people often try to compare her predicament with someone else they know who has the disease.“Every condition is so different with every person, and each person has different levels of openness when it comes to their illness,” she said.Sophomore Amy Mansfield spoke about her struggles with Type 1 Diabetes, which forces Mansfield to check her blood sugar five to eight times a day due to the risk of it fluctuating too high or too low.“Every day is different, so I’m just trying to find a perfect balance between food, insulin, stress, activity and whatever else life throws at me,” Mansfield said.While many people believe all her daily routine consists of is pricking her finger and using her pump, Mansfield said this is not true. Mansfield’s diabetes now prevents her body from telling her when her blood sugar is too low. To compensate for this, Mansfield now has a service dog, Juniper, who is able to detect an indicating chemical through smell when Mansfield’s blood sugar has dipped too low, and then pokes at Mansfield’s leg with her nose or paw to remind her to check her blood sugar.“She has likely saved my life countless times,” Mansfield said.Diagnosed with Crohn’s disease in high school, Keenan Hall rector Noel Terranova said his illness has played an important role in his life, as in college he became so sick he could not complete his semester abroad, and in his first year as rector, his disease flared up and led to a three week hospitalization. Following this incident, Terranova said he was inspired by how the Notre Dame community rallied around him.“People were able to know and understand the invisible illness that I had,” he said. “Keenan residents and other students came forward to me about their invisible illnesses.”As the group of of Invisililies is all female, Terranova also spoke specifically about the stigma of facing invisible illness as a man. Quite often, he said, he would “pretend that it didn’t exist and just be tougher.” That mentality as a man “can be a lie we tell ourselves,” he said, and called upon men of the Notre Dame community suffering from illness to develop networks of support with each other, with rectors and with the housing department, who is accommodates students with a variety of needs.“It’s really important to have networks of support, for people in your community to know what you’re going through,” said Terranova.Gabriela Leskur, a fifth-year who suffers from a blood clotting disorder, was recognized  for her honors thesis on invisible pain. Her work, a series of three films detailing people’s personal experiences with invisible illness, is on display from April 7 until May 21 in the Snite Museum.Dr. Anselma Dolcich-Ashley, an assistant professional specialist in the Glynn Family Honors program and the mother of panelist Rose Ashley, closed by thanking the panelists for their bravery, and recognized the importance of their shared stories.“You guys are teaching us to how to be empathetic, because we don’t know what to ask,” she said.Tags: invisible illness, Invisible Illness Awareness Day, Invisililieslast_img read more

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Dr. Victor Stone appointed to direct Champlain MBA program

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first_imgBURLINGTON, Vt.Dr. Victor Stone was recently appointed interim director of the MBA program in the Division of Business at Champlain College. The Champlain MBA is an online graduate program with a focus on integrating what professionals are doing at work with the MBA courses that they take.Stone has 25 years experience in a variety of management and senior management roles in supply chain management, business operations, plans and controls, pricing and competitive analysis, business transformation, IT implementation, and strategy development with International Business Machines, Corp. Microelectronics Division. He has been an instructor with Champlain Colleges graduate programs since their inceptions.Stone earned a bachelors degree in biology from the University of Idaho, an MBA from the University of Utah, and a Ph.D. in organization and management from Capella University. He is a member of the Academy of Management and has research interests in Web-based business strategy formulation, operations, e-business and organizational change.In the community, Stone is active in the Mt. Mansfield Lodge #26 Free and Accepted Masons in Jericho, where he resides. He also volunteers in support of the development of a Vermont Ballet Theater Dance facility at St. Michaels College.last_img read more

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The History of Criminal Gang Attacks in Brazil – Part II

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first_imgBy Dialogo February 28, 2013 In 2012, the PCC initiated another series of attacks that lasted three months. Unlike previous attacks, when the targets were randomly chosen, these were directed exclusively at public security agents in several regions of the large city of São Paulo, causing over 200 military police officers’ deaths. These actions also resulted in a large number of civilian deaths during confrontations with the Military Police, considerably increasing the homicide statistics in that state. In February of 2013, the state of Santa Catarina, in southern Brazil, suffered similar actions, sponsored by a gang known as Primeiro Grupo Catarinense (PGC in Portuguese). Cars and public transportation were set on fire using the same methods as the PCC gang and for the same reasons as the attacks in the three states where they were recorded: retaliation for the transfer of gang leaders to federal penitentiaries, bad conditions of the national inmate system, which is a reality, as well as the treatment rendered to the inmates. In 2010, a new confrontation started in Rio de Janeiro and lasted until the Military and Civil police took over the slums known as Complexo do Alemão. They were supported by members of the Armed Forces and powerful weaponry. The operation resulted in the apprehension of over 500 weapons, including rifles, machine guns, two bazookas, and 150 grenades, in addition to 30 tons of drugs, and the arrest of 200 people. Over 100 vehicles were set on fire, and 39 people were killed in this incident, which was the longest running conflict led by a criminal organization ever in Brazil. *André Luís Woloszyn, Strategic Affairs Analyst On the first day of confrontation a police helicopter was shot down using a rifle, resulting in three deaths after the aircraft caught on fire and exploded on the ground. The drug dealers from the slum, using AR 15 and HK 47 rifles, machineguns and pistols of different calibers, set up barricades with barrels and tires to prevent vehicles from driving through, specifically police cars. Electrical power was sabotaged and interrupted, and the buses stopped circulating temporarily. There were some video surveillance cameras installed by the drug dealers, a kind of counter-intelligence, observing the movement of the police and unfamiliar people to the community that would try to enter the slum. The drug dealers would arrive at the slum in pairs or in a group of at most three, most of them by foot, pretending to be residents or delivery people. The official report registered 42 deaths, eight injuries, and a school, eight buses and two cars were burned down. There were 58 arrests and 38 weapons were apprehended, including five grenades that are exclusively used by the Armed Forces. (Continued from Part I) In the meantime, these same gangs, especially the PCC and the CV, which are considered the two largest Brazilian criminal organizations, were involved in other incidents. Their main business is drug trafficking and both have connections with counterparts in Latin American countries. In 2009, members of the Comando Vermelho (Red Command) criminal organization invaded the slum known as Morro dos Macacos, located in Rio de Janeiro’s northern area, using urban guerrilla tactics as seen in the movies. The attack was a turf war with a rival gang over drug sale points and also as retaliation for the increased numbers of militias in the area. The actions lasted almost two days with intense combat between drug dealers and the police. With the UPPs, this is not the reality anymore.last_img read more

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Mitigating PINless debit fraud exposure

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first_img 30SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Ann Davidson Ann assists credit unions in identifying areas of risk in their operations and recommends sound loss control measures to help reduce loss exposures.Davidson has over 40 years working with … Web: www.alliedsolutions.net Details Various financial institutions around the country have experienced counterfeit activity resulting from “PINless” debit transactions, some of which have led to losses in excess of $100,000. PINless debit authorizations involve purchases under $50.00 that do not require consumers to key in a PIN or supply a signature at a point-of-sale device (POS). As EMV technology continues to be adopted by merchants, more and more of them will choose to enable PINless debit transactions, to offer consumer convenience and reduced interchange fee costs, and fraudsters are taking full advantage.When a merchant allows PINless debit transactions, fraudsters can more easily use stolen card information, since they are not being asked to supply a PIN or any other authentication when making these types of purchases. An account holder’s card may be used multiple times prior to the fraudulent activity being detected. So fraudsters make numerous PINless transactions and walk away with big rewards. Here are steps you should take to help mitigate PINless debit fraud exposure:Confirm that your card processor’s fraud monitoring system recognizes and is paying special attention to PINless debit transactions at the POS, especially recurring transactions at the same location. Make sure you are not one of the many financial institutions that haven’t signed up for their card processor’s program to monitor PINless debit authorizations.See if your financial institution can decline all debit authorizations that are conducted without a PIN, and consider disallowing these transactions if this option is in fact permissible.Check that all networks used for PINless debit authorizations are in place with your card processor, so that you can monitor PINless debit authorizations. Ensure your fraud monitoring system has strategies in place to help address any uptick in PINless debit fraud exposure. Connect with you card processor to make sure they have velocity parameters in place for transactions requiring PINless debit authorizations.Consider blocking and reissuing cards that may have been impacted by a data breach, as this card data could potentially be compromised. Confirm your fraud monitoring system is identifying “chip PINless” authorizations and confirm strategies are in place to monitor and prevent PINless fraud exposure on these cards.Understand your card association’s PINless debit network liability rules, since Visa and Mastercard do not apply the same zero-liability program benefits to PINless debit.Understand the Durbin rights and how PINless debit transactions are routed. Read articles about how your account holders could be affected by PINless debit fraud.Educate your account holders! You will likely see a large decrease in risk exposures if your account holders know what they can do to protect themselves. Your financial institution should continue to learn about PINless debit fraud so that you can fully understand the risks and take actions to help mitigate this type of debit card exposure. This content was previously published in Allied Solutions’ Risk Alert newsletter. Click here to sign up for this email list.last_img read more

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Looking ahead to AI in the credit union environment

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first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Artificial Intelligence (AI) continues to infiltrate the financial world. I recently attended the 2019 BankAI conference, hosted by American Banker, which explored how AI is being deployed in banking today with efforts such as talent reskilling, ethics and data management. Speakers included leaders from Bank of America, Harvard, U.S. Bank and Javelin.Jason Peach, president and CEO of West Community Credit Union, a PSCU Owner credit union, also attended the conference and said it presented great insight into how technology investment, specifically with AI, is being applied within many of the larger financial institutions (FIs).“One of the key takeaways was to ensure that our business needs are considered first, and early on, when determining which AI technology investments to make,” Peach commented. “Additionally, it became clear that AI, in many cases, will not fully replace our human workforce, but adapt how we use our workforce to best leverage the AI solutions we deploy. This is an area credit unions should watch and begin to take action on from a strategic perspective, especially in recognizing the sheer financial resources being committed to it by the largest institutions.”Throughout the conference, several trends began to emerge. Here are some key takeaways and highlights from my conference experience.last_img read more

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Wednesday people roundup [updated]

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first_imgAberdeen AM – Aberdeen Asset Management has named Hennie Houtveen as its head of asset management and transactions in the Netherlands. He will be tasked with optimising the Dutch property portfolio and in particular acquiring logistic real estate and shopping centres for Aberdeen’s investment funds. Previously, Houtveen worked at engineering firm Royal Haskoning DHV, the €15bn railways pension fund SPF, Meeùs Group and NS Stations, where he was responsible for commercial property of the Dutch Railways. Houtveen succeeds Mark Tordoir, who left for Heeneman & Partners, a firm focusing on structuring property investment funds.M&G Investments – Grant Hadland has joined the asset management arm of UK insurer Prudential as institutional equity multi-asset business development director. He was previously at Standard Life Investments, responsible for consultant relations, and held a similar role at Royal London Asset Management before that. M&G said Hadland would be responsible for developing its equity and multi-asset businesses, which manage £58bn (€67.6bn).Legal & General Investment Management – LGIM has hired Helena Morrissey as head of personal investing, a new role, for its UK retail investment business. Morrissey was previously chief executive of Newton Investment Management for 15 years. She is chair of UK asset management trade body the Investment Association, founded the 30% Club, which aims to get more women on company boards, and chairs the Diversity Project.Achmea IM – The €100bn asset manager Achmea Investment Management has appointed George Coppens as commercial director, succeeding Johan van Egmond, who has left Achmea. Coppens will be responsible for all client relations and meeting clients’ growth targets. He joins from Actiam – the €56bn asset manager of insurer Vivat – where he has been chief commercial officer and temporary chief executive since 2012. Prior to this, he worked at AXA, Credit Suisse and ABN Amro.SEI – The fiduciary manager has hired Simon Betteley from BlackRock. He joins as a sales director for the firm’s UK institutional sales team, and will focus on growing SEI’s business with larger UK pension funds. Betteley has also held investment and consulting roles at Aon Hewitt and Mercer.BMO GAM – BMO Global Asset Management has appointed Marga Hoek as a member of its responsible investment advisory council, which oversees BMO’s environmental, social, and governance-related investments. Hoek is chief executive and initiator of Groene Zaak, a network for sustainable entrepreneurs. She succeeds sustainability expert Annemieke Wijn of Anchor Consult, who leaves after completing her two-year term.Feri Trust – Marc Lennetz has joined the German investment manager from Frankfurter Volksbank. He has responsibility for strengthening Feri’s relations with private banks, savings banks and co-operative banks in Germany. Aon – Mark Duncan and Louise Wheeler have joined Aon’s DC business to cater for clients of the consultant’s master trust and other bundled trust-based schemes. Duncan joins from Scottish Widows where he managed some of the company’s largest corporate pensions arrangements. Wheeler transfers from Aon’s flexible benefits business.Brabners – The UK commercial law firm has appointed Ian Mylrea to lead the firm’s national pensions practice. He joined the company in December from DLA Piper and has worked for KPMG and Merrill Lynch. ING/NNIP – The new collective defined contribution (CDC) pension funds of ING and NNIP have each appointed a three-strong supervisory board (RvT), comprising Irene Vermeeren as chair and Erwin Capitain and Pim Baljet as members.Vermeeren is a pensions lawyer at JonesDay, whereas Capitain is a lecturer in accountancy at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam as well as supervisor at several pension funds. Baljet is executive chairman of private asset manager Oyens & Van Eeghen. Both pension funds have largely the same members on their board. The schemes ING CDC and NN CDC were established when the €30bn ING Pensioenfonds closed, following the division of ING into a banking arm and an asset management and insurance business.Standard Chartered – Tracey McDermott, former acting chief executive of the UK’s financial regulator, is to join the investment bank as group head of corporate, public, and regulatory affairs on 20 March. McDermott led the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) from September 2015 until June 2016, bridging the gap between Martin Wheatley and current CEO Andrew Bailey. Prior to taking the CEO role, McDermott held a number of senior roles at the FCA overseeing financial services conduct regulation. At Standard Chartered, she will be responsible for public affairs, sustainability, and communications, and will join the company’s management team.Universal-Investment – Former State Street chief financial officer Frank Eggloff has joined the management board of the German asset manager as managing director. He was previously CFO at State Street in Munich, and spent 15 years with the company in various roles. At Universal he will be in charge of finance and controlling, the company said.last_img read more

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Bumi Armada Wins Third FPSO Project in India

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first_imgMalaysia-based Bumi Armada has secured a contract from India’s Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Ltd (ONGC) to provide a floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) vessel.Namely, the company’s joint venture Shapoorji Pallonji Bumi Armada Godavari Private Limited(SPBAG) received a Notification of Award for the FPSO, that will operate off the west coast of Kakinada, India.The charter hire and operations deal is for a fixed period of nine years, valued at around USD 2.1 billion (MYR 8.8 billion). ONGC has the option to extend the contract for up to seven years. On an annual basis and if fully exercised, the extensions would be worth USD 655 million (MYR 2.7 billion).“The JV with SPOGPL has been a very successful partnership, this being our third FPSO project together in India and fourth in total,” Leon Harland, Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer, said.“This is a positive result for the group and the project will add value to Bumi Armada going forward,” Harland added.SPBAG is a 30:70 joint venture between Bumi Armada and Shapoorji Pallonji Oil & Gas Private Limited of India.last_img read more

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Lady Wildcats Win Against NC Trojans

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first_imgIt was a great night for the Lady Wildcat golf team! They shot their season low 159 and beat New Castle for another dual meet win. This brings their dual meet record this season to 6-2. Sophomore, Gracie Graf, shot a personal best of 37 and was medallist for the meet. Junior, Ashlan Hill, also had a personal best with a score of 40.“Tonight was just what my team needed. They got to play on their home course after a being on the road for 4 straight meets. They totally dominated and got their confidence back. We have the rest of the week off to practice and will welcome our first weekend off since the season started. The break and another home meet next week is just what the team will need going into our Conference tournament. Confidence and a well rested team is a great combination going into the post season.” Wildcats Coach Marisa Mears.FC Scores. Maggie Brack-38, Abby Orschell-44, Gracie Graf-37 (personal best), Camryn Brewer-45, Ashlan Hill-40, Taylor McCreary-56, Sam Ebrens-55, Kelsie Brackney-61.last_img read more

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