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KELLY’S CENTRA NOMINATED FOR WORLD’S BEST CONVENIENCE STORE

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first_imgKelly’s Centra have incredibly been shortlisted for the NACS Global Convenience Store of the year award for the second year running. Following on from their recent success in the Centra Store of the Year Awards in February, Kelly’s Centra has been shortlisted for the prestigious international accolade.It is the second time in as many years that the store has been shortlisted for the prestigious award. NACS global convenience retailer of the Year has shortlisted Kelly’s Centra for their outstanding ability to continue to evolve, adapt and improve the service they provide to the local community.Kelly’s Centra have established a stellar reputation over the years for their commitment to providing the highest standards of customer service excellence.Since winning the Centra Store of the Year award in February, they set about increasing the space at the front of store making much easier to shop and added extra space to fresh fruit and veg.A highly acclaimed health foods section, fresh homemade takeaway meals and not to mention a whole new section given over to fresh Artisan breads. Over the past few years, the store has won numerous industry accolades from Centra, Shelflife, EIQA and Forecourt and Convenience Retailer to name a few, with the NACS Global store of the Year award being one which they will be keen to bring home to Donegal for the very first time.There is a voting system in place which will decide along with marks being given for a mystery shopper to decide the final three for the awards ceremony which will be held at the Renaissance St Pancras Hotel in London in June.You can vote for Kelly’s Centra by clicking on the link below.http://www.globalcstorefocus.com/awards/Kelly%27s%20Centra%2c%20MouKELLY’S CENTRA NOMINATED FOR WORLD’S BEST CONVENIENCE STORE was last modified: April 28th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:BusinessFeaturesKelly’s Centranewslast_img read more

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Tigers fall short at home, Warriors pick up 1st Big 5 win

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first_imgArcata suffered its first league loss of the season as the Del Norte Warriors tamed the Tigers 54-52 Tuesday night at Arcata High.With Tuesday’s loss the Tigers (2-1, 8-10) risk falling a game back of Fortuna (2-0, 17-1) , which plays its next Big 5 Conference game on Thursday. For the Warriors (1-1, 10-4), Tuesday’s win moves them out of the bottom of the Big 5 as they must now play catch up if they are to climb back to the top of the conference before the end of the season.The Warriors were …last_img

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Saturday roundup: ‘Woods women’s basketball blows out Hartnell, Del Norte football advances to NCS title round

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first_imgNCS D5: No. 2 Del Norte 28 No. 3 Moreau Catholic 7Del Norte’s Kobe Mitchell scooped up a fumble and returned it 5 yards for a touchdown with under five minutes to play, sealing a 28-7 North Coast Section Division 5 semifinal win over Moreau Catholic, Saturday night at Mike Whalen Field in Crescent City.Mitchell also scored a on a 3-yard run late in the first-quarter. Quarterback OJ Calleja found the endzone twice for the Warriors, once in the first frame and again in the third on a pair of 1 …last_img

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Blast Your Way to Evolutionary Progress

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first_imgThe cartoony slogan “Evolve or perish” garnered support from a new story about evolution.  Dave Mosher on Live Science shamelessly titled his article “Catastrophic impacts made life flourish,” describing the theory by Birger Schmitz [U of Lund, Sweden] that the Ordovician extinction was caused by a meteor impact.  Out of the wreckage, a plethora of new life emerged, he thinks.  Don’t tell that to students: “If you push an ecosystem too hard, you’ll destroy it,” he said.  “But for the organisms living on Earth at the time, [the environment] pushed them to adapt and fill new niches.  It’s like at the university: I tell my students all the time that if we don’t push you, you don’t evolve.”Whoops; too late.  For the equivocation of confusing random mutation and natural selection with purpose-driven, goal-seeking, hopefully-intelligent study, Schmitz easily wins Stupid Evolution Quote of the Week.Your evolutionary biologists at work.  No further comment necessary. (Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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The boy who sees in pictures

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first_imgUmuzi volunteer Floyd Vilankulu helpsThabiso Motloung with his shot.“Captain” Kgaugelo Mabjwe practisinghis craft.(Images: Emily van Rijswijck)MEDIA CONTACTS • Emily CoppelUmuzi workshop coordinator+27 76 917 8042RELATED ARTICLES• Nikon to nurture young photographers• PhotoAfrica shows Africa’s cityscapes• Alex to host Football for Hope• UN rewards Alex renewal project• Bieber wins top press photo awardEmily van Rijswijck“Captain” Kgaugelo Mabjwe is one of eight students of the Umuzi Photo Club, based in the Johannesburg suburb of Braamfontein, who are currently exhibiting their work at the prestigious Gallery@Oxo on London’s South Bank.The Wembley to Soweto exhibition is a visual depiction of how photography helped the eight teenagers to unleash their talent and realise their dreams. The exhibition runs until 24 July, and admission is free.The brainchild of internationally renowned photographer John Cole and actor/director David Westhead of Wilton Pictures, the project is also supported by Kweku Mandela, the grandson of former president Nelson Mandela.Mabjwe attended his first workshop with Umuzi (isiZulu, meaning “village”) in 2009. The photo club had been started in the same year by financial analyst David Dini, “to give a voice to young people through the medium of photography”, said Emily Coppel, the project’s facilitator.But the really big break for Mabjwe, Patience Ndhlovu, Siyabonga Sepotokele, Tshepang Masemola, Joao Nzina, Shoneez Cassim and Thapelo Motsumi came when Cole and Westhead approached Umuzi Club.Cole is the photographer who took a shot of the Free Mandela concert, held in 1988 at Wembley Stadium to mark Mandela’s 70th birthday, and which is now on display in the Nobel laureate’s home in Johannesburg.Witness to the World CupEarly in 2010 Cole and Westhead held an in-depth four-week workshop with the eight students, before asking them to be official witnesses to the 2010 Fifa World Cup, which took place in South Africa in June and July that year.The aim of the project was to teach disadvantaged young people how to feed their families with their cameras, said Cole on the exhibition’s website.The teenagers attended the official World Cup opening and recorded some extraordinary images with the wide-eyed innocence and honesty so typical of people their age.Now, the Wembley to Soweto exhibition, which opened on 7 July, is showing 52 of the best pictures.An excited Westhead spoke to Leicester Square Television (LSQ TV) before the opening, relating how this “small” project has snowballed into other projects and opportunities for the eight youngsters. He believes great things are still going to come from them.“The pictures speak for themselves. It’s wonderful. It warrants being exhibited. They [the students] are absolute dynamite.”In the same interview, Cole described his experiences with the group, noting that he was constantly surprised in the best possible sense by what came out of the project.“Some of these pictures are really gritty, really gutsy – the kind of reportage that I cut my teeth on and what makes me love photography so much.”Three of the eight, Thapelo Motsumi, Patience Ndhlovu and Shoneez Cassim, attended the exhibition’s official opening in London. While in the city, they also had the chance to impart some of their photographic knowledge to other kids, this time in London’s East End areas of Streatham and Newham.The young travellers also attended an exclusive photo shoot with renowned actor Alan Rickman, better known as Prof Snape in the Harry Potter film series.As Cassim said in during a LSQ TV interview: “Now when I take a picture it is not just about taking a photograph anymore – it is about asking myself, what can I tell, what will people see when they see it?”International exposureMotsumi was interviewed by Outlook, a programme on the BBC World Service with a listenership of 40-million, where he was able to share the experience of growing up in Johannesburg’s bustling Yeoville suburb, and feeling the weight of a real single-lens reflex camera in his hands for the first time.That was in 2009, when he joined Mabjwe and the group for a workshop at Umuzi. Up to that point he did not think much about photography, he admitted, rather seeing himself as becoming an artist one day.He now refers to his camera as his baby, his friend. “A camera is a powerful tool. You can change people’s lives with it. You can make a difference, you can tell stories with it.”As a result of the Wembley to Soweto exposure, Motsumi has already successfully completed several paid assignments for Marie Claire women’s magazine, South African Breweries, mobile provider Vodacom and Parliament. He continues to do workshops and assignments for UmuziSaid Cole: “If this has given them some confidence, then I have succeeded. That’s really the important thing. Photography is almost secondary.”On site in AlexMeanwhile, back at home in South Africa, Mabjwe and the rest continue with workshops and programmes offered by Umuzi, and identify for themselves the social issues they wish to address through the lens.Over the July school holidays, the Umuzi team was on site in Alexandra township, east of the city, to record the problems of school drop-outs and teenage pregnancies at the Alex East Bank Clinic.It is an issue close to the heart of the group because it is one of the community’s biggest challenges.“Here in Alex, teenage pregnancy is a big problem, especially at the East Bank High School,” said Precious Ntlabathi who is doing her first Umuzi workshop.She attributed the problem to kids not knowing enough about the risks, peer pressure, drug and alcohol abuse. “Through my photographs, I hope to raise awareness.”“The idea is for students to start thinking critically about issues affecting them and to become advocates for change through their eyewitness accounts,” added Coppel.Recently, students did a presentation to Parliament on the lack of service delivery in the country. They’ve also exhibited their work in galleries in New York, Antwerp and Johannesburg.After the workshops, exhibitions are usually held in the community to create social awareness through the evocative images.“The hope is to engage the media and people to talk about these issues affecting young people and to bring about some change,” said Coppel.Becoming an Umuzi student Umuzi participants undergo an intensive selection and interview process. Club staff visit schools in the Johannesburg area, usually at morning assembly, where they introduce the club to the pupils. Afterwards, application forms are handed out to interested scholars.Those selected show enthusiasm and an aptitude for photography. But, said Coppel, it should not be to the detriment of their school work. The target group is Grade 10, pupils around 16 years of age.From the basic workshops, teenagers showing potential in photography can follow Umuzi’s Leadership through Photography course. The club also assists, through various sponsorships, in putting some of the students through formal photographic courses.“The idea is that they learn to become professional,” said Coppel.And today, young Mabjwe, for one, sees himself as someone with a future. From a Diepsloot youngster with no real plans for the future, he now harbours big dreams.“I love photography. Every day I think about taking good pictures. I see myself overseas, working as a freelance photographer one day.”And he has this to say about his work: “I can speak with my pictures. There are many stories inside my pictures.”last_img read more

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A wild beard and fierce convictions

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first_imgMany voices brought down apartheid, and writer Cornelius Thomas is determined the less-famous activists will also be remembered for their participation in the struggle. In Time with Dennis Brutus, he examines the life of the poet who stood up against oppression in all its forms, even those new oppressors who simply replaced the old guard.The late anti-apartheid activist Dennis Brutus’s last four years are poignantly captured by Cornelius Thomas in “Time with Dennis Brutus”. (Image: Michael Barry)Shamin ChibbaDennis Brutus pensively stroked his silver beard with both hands, thinking about the time in 1959 when Brazilian football club Portuguesa Santista were planning to visit South Africa to play against an all-white Western Province team. The Brazilian side was willing to drop their black players for the visit, in deference to apartheid, he said. But Brutus was not willing to let that happen.“I phoned the president [Juscelino Kubitschek] of Brazil directly,” he recalled. “I explained the situation to him, saying we could not allow racism to prevail in sport and asked him to intervene. He then cabled the team, ordering them not to play in South Africa.”This is one anecdote of many in the book, Time with Dennis Brutus, in which author Cornelius Thomas characterises the late poet, journalist and activist by two things: his unfaltering love for humanity and that beard, which he wore until his death in December 2009. Thomas’s other nonfiction works, Dust in My Coffee and Finding Freedom in the Bush of Books, give a voice to the lesser known bastions of the liberation struggle. Time with Dennis Brutus is no different.It describes the enjoyable moments he shared with Brutus in the last four years of the activist’s life. “Our conversations brought out the private and personal Dennis. I thought I had to share some of that with posterity,” the author says.A memorable recollection from the days spent with Brutus while writing his book was a visit to 20 Shell Street in North End, Port Elizabeth. Brutus and his young family lived here during apartheid while he was under a state banning order. “He wanted to pause there, I guess to reflect and reminisce a bit. We sat there for maybe 30 minutes and he told me about his family life, and how he beat his banning order. I think it was a special moment for him and certainly a poignant one for me.”Thomas first met “the man with long steel-grey hair” at the National Arts Festival in Grahamstown in 2000. He was interviewing the activist and feminist writer Lauretta Ngcobo when he bumped into Brutus. “He was not intense,” he recalls. “He was jovial and seemed a fun-loving guy. I liked him right away.”Such a first impression was in contrast to the man’s fiery activism, evident in his successful campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from participating in the Olympic Games. “Dennis believed that the individual could make a difference. He looked into the world and saw many wrongs and he felt called to address them, without deference or political correctness,” explains Thomas. Sport as a platform for protestThe first time Brutus turned to sport as a “terrain on which to fight for fairness” was in the 1940s. At the time, Seretse Khama, a young black high jumper, was not allowed to compete against white athletes. That young athlete went on to become the first president of Botswana, and received a KBE from Queen Elizabeth. Brutus went on to set up the South African Sports Association in October 1958 with GK Rangasamy and Arthur Lutchman. The name was neutral, said Brutus, and it did not give too much away. “We stood for merit on a non-racial basis in sport.”He was banned from literary, academic and political activities in 1961, yet he went on to help establish the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee in 1963, which led to the international sports boycott against apartheid South Africa. As a result, he was arrested and imprisoned on Robben Island. While incarcerated, he heard that South Africa had been suspended from the 1964 Tokyo Olympics.In 2007, Brutus was nominated for induction into the South African Sports Hall of Fame, which is organised by veteran rugby player Naas Botha. Ever the activist, he declined, saying: “It is incompatible to have those who championed racist sport alongside its genuine victims.” Protest poetryBrutus’s writings always had an air of protest about them. The Gale Contemporary Black Biography series described his Sirens, Knuckles and Boots, published in 1963, as his way of shouldering his own burdens in the fight against racism. It said that although his words carried a tone of dissent, his poems “lack any element of self-pity”.After serving 18 months on Robben Island, he published Letters to Martha and Other Poems from a South African Prison in 1968. Addressed to his sister-in-law, the poems were conversational and direct, so that ordinary people could understand them. This literary change came about after he spent five months in solitary confinement, during which time he “re-examined his verse and his attitudes toward creative self-expression”.Thomas explains that Brutus’s writing was inspired by the discrimination he witnessed while growing up. “I think growing up when segregation hardened and when apartheid worked its way through our social fabric, he saw wrongs everywhere: unfair discrimination, evictions, forced removals, denial of opportunity.”He was also prompted to take action by the inactivity of others. “Dennis had courage, a keen mind, and a social conscience. My book shows that even when he was in junior high, he was prepared to mobilise against wrong.”Brutus’s defiance inspired a generation of activists, including Thomas, who became an activist as a student at the University of the Western Cape. “He fought for the poor, on every frontline where greed and oppression tried to halt the march towards a more human society.” Still relevantHe may have been one of the lesser known political activists of the liberation struggle, but this does not mean Brutus’s efforts are to be ignored. According to Thomas, South Africans today need to heed his message more than ever before. Brutus believed every generation should fight against the social ills of hunger, poverty, oppression and denial of opportunity. “As a modern people, who claim to embrace the human race and a universal human rights culture, we cannot retire into privacy as if ‘the struggle’ was over,” Thomas explains.Brutus’s successor would have to be steadfast to ward off today’s challenges, Thomas says, pointing to the writer and sociologist, Ashwin Desai, as the candidate to take over from where Brutus left off. “Like Dennis, [Desai] is eloquent and fearless, and his heart is in the right place. With the poor, his body is on the line, opposing the forces of injustice and greed.”Writer and sociologist Ashwin Desai is touted as Brutus’ successor. (Image: University of Johannesburg)As for Brutus, he thought highly of Desai. Commenting on the latter’s book, We Are the Poors, Brutus described the author as one of South Africa’s leading activist intellectuals. And then, in his Dennis Brutus Memorial Lecture in Port Elizabeth in 2012, Desai returned the compliment, saying he hoped his address would take up Brutus’s challenge of querying the “form and content of the national liberation struggles” and the “democratic transition in South Africa”.Desai does not see himself as a role model. “But if a budding young activist were to look for a role model,” says Thomas, “the best I can think of is Ashwin.” South Africa todayBefore his death, Brutus was critical of the direction South Africa had taken. Thomas says the old activist felt the revolution had been betrayed and that one set of oppressors had been replaced by another. “He was deeply disturbed by the mindless embrace of neo-liberalism.”He notes that the ruling classes are crafting mythologies based on half-truths, and that activists such as Brutus are effectively being written out of the national narrative. “Any new ruling party wants to write history its way, perhaps [at the same time] marginalising or excluding others. There is much untruthfulness in such a process. And Dennis would have us speak truth to power.”Indeed, in a passage in Time with Dennis Brutus, the activist speaks honestly about present-day global challenges. At a social gathering in East London in October 2008, Brutus said people had to embrace new causes or allow them to find us. “We live in new realities today and we must tackle, politically, the challenges of the day – corporate greed, globalisation, the depletion of the earth’s resources.”He was an activist until his dying breath, aiming to attend the 2009 UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen. According to Thomas, Brutus believed climate justice was humanity’s new cause. Sadly, he did not make it to Denmark – he died in his sleep at the age of 85.Though Thomas’s book is an attempt to hold on to Brutus’s legacy, he does not intend on being the messenger for the latter’s ideologies. Instead, he leaves those theories to academics and their dissertations. Thomas prefers to share Brutus’s voice with generations to come. “My book is but a friendly salute to him. To thank him for allowing me into his company, into his thoughts, and, I would like to think, into his heart.”last_img read more

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Do You Need To Go Cyborg To Keep Your Job?

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first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market We’ve got two paths into the future: We can chill out, learn to manage our dependence on digital devices and streams of information and figure out how to balance today’s crazy productivity requirements with our personal lives. Or we can jack ourselves into the matrix, pump our bodies with steroids and “cognitive enhancers” and become unrecognizable worker-mutants. And if the folks we’re competing with are determined to go the mutant route, do we even have the choice to opt out?I just read a scary AP article based on a British academic report about the “superhuman workplace.” The authors warn that we aren’t preparing our businesses and institutions for the consequences of a trend that’s already well underway. People are taking speed to stay alert longer and they’re strapping wearable computers to their bodies for constant connection — and tracking.  More to the point, companies are starting to realize these technologies could offer a tempting performance boost to their workforce.If it suddenly becomes profitable to hire jacked-up cyborg mutants, what do you think that’s going to do to the job market for your typical Homo sapiens?It’s the Lance Armstrong conundrum. If enough others in the sport are doping, you either dope, too, or you lose. You may want to live in a future populated by recognizable humans, working on or with computers, but still living at a natural pace, taking breaks, eating and sleeping regularly, all that good stuff. But if your colleagues and competitors are all frying on Ritalin — or have an extra pair of super-strong titanium arms — whose going to hire plain old you?We’ve started a series called ReadWrite Pause, where we’re trying to figure out how to balance our digital and analog lives. We love technology, like most of you surely do, but we’re also wary of letting it control us. As work moves into the proverbial cloud, and our responsibilities become always-on multitasks, we’re compelled to be constantly connected, always “at work.” We suspect this isn’t good for the ancient, essentially human parts of us.Digital technology is a performance-enhancing drug. It makes us capable of getting much more done, in good and bad ways. That’s why, if we don’t get a handle on this soon and figure out what we really want for a future, the economy of tomorrow might not leave us with a choice.Lead image courtesy of Shutterstock. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img jon mitchell Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#Pause last_img read more

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Code Camp Bitmaker Labs Gets Legal

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first_imglauren orsini Related Posts Days after it came to light that Bitmaker Labs might be breaking Canadian law, the Toronto-based coding school is working with the Ontario government towards getting itself in the clear.Ontario’s Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities (MTCU) sent inspectors to the coding bootcamp after it heard about it through positive press in the Globe and Mail. The governing body was concerned that Bitmaker Labs, which runs a nine-week boot camp that students pay $9,000 to attend, was running an unregulated private college. (See also Canadian Province Cracks Down On Coding Schools)Heather Payne, who runs another Toronto coding school called HackerYou, explained in a blog post that, under the 2005 Private Career Colleges Act, programs that cost more than $1,000 or last for more than 40 hours are legally private colleges. (This is also why the cheaper, shorter HackerYou will not face an investigation.)Who’s Really Helping Entrepreneurs?Many of Bitmaker Labs’ supporters have taken to Twitter to decry the MTCU for “stifling” innovation in business. Brad Duguid, the Minister of Training, Colleges, and University, released a statement to ReadWrite that defends the ministry’s actions. “The Ontario government is a champion of entrepreneurs and as such, we will do everything to help Ontario’s innovators and entrepreneurs succeed,” he said. “Of course, Bitmaker will need to register, just like everyone else—and they are currently in the process of doing that. I hope that this matter will be resolved very soon.”A Burden For Startup Code SchoolsBitmaker Labs cofounder Matt Gray confirmed to ReadWrite that the process is ongoing, but that it’s lengthy and arduous. “The registration process is extremely burdensome for a startup and the costs can be quite substantial,” Gray said. “It’s also necessary to include approved examinations and assessments. The regulatory hurdles can take a lot of time.”Nevertheless, Gray plans to cooperate fully and get Bitmaker Labs regulated as quickly as possible. They may be shut down temporarily, but he said there are no hard feelings.“Brad is a great guy and wants to fuel the entrepreneurial community here in Ontario,” he said. “I’m confident we’ll be able to resolve this issue in a timely manner. The government has indicated their willingness to work with us. We’re excited to change education and help build the startup ecosystem in Canada.”Photo of Matt Gray with students courtesy of Bitmaker Labs Why You Love Online Quizzes Tags:#Bitmaker Labs#education#Toronto Tech center_img 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoidlast_img read more

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‘No Odisha policeman found guilty of rights violation, corruption’

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first_imgAt a time when the Odisha Police is getting ready to be rated by complainants and victims of crimes, none of its 976 police inspectors facing human rights violation and corruption allegations has been found guilty in the last five years.In response to an RTI application, the State police headquarters acknowledged that 976 such allegations had been received against inspectors and reserve inspectors between 2014 and 2019.Human rights activist Biswapriya Kanungo had submitted RTI applications seeking information on such allegations and action taken on them.“We have been sending all allegations to the district Senior Superintendent of Police as well as Deputy Commissioner for submission of inquiry and action taken reports. As many as 574 inquiry reports have been received at the HQ,” said the PHQ Public Information Officer.No response “No allegation or complaint against police inspectors has been substantiated or established. No administrative or penal action has been taken against any inspector,” informed the PIO.In case of the remaining 402 cases, the PIO did not say anything. Similarly, 102 allegations were received against Assistant Commissioner of Police and Deputy Superintendent of Police during the same period. But, the PHQ again kept mum.In case of allegations of corruption against serving IPS officers in Odisha, the Vigilance Department refused to divulge anything.“The State government specifies that nothing contained in the Act shall apply to General Administration (Vigilance), Department and its organisation,” said Vigilance Department PIO.“The piece of information is disturbing. It indicates as if all allegations against police officers were false. We believe that allegations were thrown to dustbins and no proper inquiry was held. The much-talked-about transparency and accountability has lost its meaning,” said Mr. Kanungo.last_img read more

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India vs Australia: Mayank Markande makes T20I debut, KL Rahul returns

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