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U$10,000 Cocaine Disappears in Court

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first_imgA consignment of cocaine valued over US$10,000 arrested with a Nigerian national on August 15, in Nimba County and sent to the Sanniquellie Magisterial Court has reportedly disappeared from the custody of the court.Already, the clerk of the court has complained about the disappearance of the illicit drugs to the police.Police Chief Detective for Nimba County, James Q. Kartoe, told the Daily Observer via mobile phone that on September 5, the clerk of the Magisterial Court reported a burglary at the court where the cocaine was allegedly stolen.According to Detective Kartoe, the incident took place on September 5, but was reported to the police the next day.Up to press time last night, Police in Sanniquellie did not make any arrest, but the Police Crime Services Department told this paper that the crime was an organized one. Kartoe however did not link anyone to commiting the alleged crime.The Nimba Branch of Liberia Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), on Saturday August 15, arrested a 32-year old Nigerian, Paul Ikegbunam, with a huge quantity of high quality narcotic substances at the Immigration Check Point, while he was enroute to Monrovia.The Cocaine was concealed in the man’s footwear (African Slippers) and sealed up with thread as an ordinary pair of slippers.The DEA, upon the arrest of the suspect, put the quantity of the cocaine to about 315.1 grams with the street value of US$7,875 and L$677, 250.The DEA charged him for “unlawful possession of narcotic drug/cocaine” and sent him to the Sanniquellie Magisterial Court for prosecution since August 17.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Lancaster man gets eight years for shooting

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first_img The argument turned into a fistfight and Matheu pulled out a gun and shot and killed Morua, homicide investigators said. The defendants are believed to be members of an East Los Angeles-based gang that has members in the Antelope Valley and was involved in drive-by shootings and other crimes in downtown Lancaster. Matheu was sentenced in April 2003 to a year in jail after pleading no contest to assault with a firearm in connection with two drive-by shootings. He previously had a conviction in 1999 of being a felon in possession of a firearm. Garcia was sentenced in 2000 to six years in prison for a burglary conviction and was released on parole in September 2003. Morua, 26, of Lancaster also was a parolee. He was sent to prison in 1996 after convictions on assault and weapon charges and originally released on parole in May 1998. He was returned to prison several times before being released on parole for the last time four months before he was killed, Department of Corrections records show. Karen Maeshiro, (661) 267-5744 karen.maeshiro@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESanta Anita opens winter meet Saturday with loaded card In addition to pleading no contest Thursday, Garcia admitted gang and gun allegations. The conviction marks a second strike for Garcia under California’s “three strikes, you’re out” law. Co-defendant Rafael Espinoza, 26, of Palmdale was sentenced in December to six years in prison after pleading no contest to assault with force likely to produce great bodily injury, being an accessory after the fact for murder, and possession of a firearm as an aider and abettor. Espinoza drove Matheu and Garcia on Feb. 17, 2003, to a house in the 44700 block of Elm Avenue where Matheu’s girlfriend lived. Espinoza told investigators he assumed something was going to happen to Matheu’s girlfriend, whom Matheu had shot at a few days earlier. Instead, Morua, a neighbor, confronted Matheu and accused him of selling drugs to Morua’s girlfriend, prosecutors said. LANCASTER – A reputed Antelope Valley gang member has been sentenced to eight years in prison in the slaying of a Lancaster parolee shot to death after an argument at his downtown home. Richard Garcia III, 25, of Lancaster pleaded no contest – the equivalent of a guilty plea but one that can’t be used against him in civil court – to being an accessory after prosecutors agreed to drop a murder charge. Garcia was accused of participating in the killing of 26-year-old Arthur Raymond Morua of Lancaster, who prosecutors said was shot by friend and fellow gang member Byron Matheu, now a fugitive. “Garcia saw his friend getting beat up and came in to aid him. It was difficult to prove that he aided and abetted in a murder,” Deputy District Attorney Benny Osorio said. “It was difficult to prove that Garcia foresaw Matheu shooting in this situation. It was an intervening act.” last_img read more

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Scientists: Who Can You Believe?

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first_imgScientists form a kind of knowledge priesthood in our modern world, but when long-taught principles get overturned, it raises questions on what scientists really know.Windy geology:  Wind is a more powerful force for eroding mountains than previously thought.  University of Arizona quoted Paul Kapp, an associate professor of geosciences at U of A saying, “No one had ever thought that wind could be this effective.  You won’t read in a textbook that wind is a major process in terms of breaking down rock material.”    According to the press release, “Bedrock in Central Asia that would have formed mountains instead was sand-blasted into dust” called loess that forms large sedimentary deposits.  Looking at the extent of the Loess Plateau south of the Gobi Desert, the largest deposit of wind-blown sediment known, Kapp calculated that wind can be just as effective as rivers and glaciers in wearing down mountains.Sabertooth vegan unicorn:  A fossil of a very strange beast called Tiarajudens has been found in Brazil with 5-inch-long, dagger like teeth, resembling those of a sabertooth cat.  This dog-size animal, though, was apparently vegetarian.  PhysOrg said archaeologists found it, but they probably meant paleontologists; National Geographic News showed an artist reconstruction of it baring its teeth in a fierce pose.    One of the discoverers remarked that it “looks like a combination of different animals, and it takes some time to believe it when you see this animal in front of you.”  Usually, dagger-like canines are marks of carnivores.  Did these animals use them to hunt plants?  Or did they intimidate rivals or scare off predators?  No one knows.  National Geographic speculated, “The answer may lie in evolutionary experimentation,” a statement that implicitly personifies evolution.    Jorg Frobish, commenting on the fossil in Science,1 said that synapsids like Tiarajudens have been “historically but erroneously known as ‘mammal-like reptiles’” – another reversal from what many textbooks and TV documentaries have called them.    In this specimen, “the degree of heterodonty (tooth differentiation) in Tiarajudens is remarkable.”  Saber teeth are “exceedingly uncommon in herbivorous forms,” he added, saying the teeth in Tiarajudens are “extraordinary”.  What does this mean for our understanding of fossil teeth?These findings raise a question: When is a saber tooth a saber tooth, and when is it a tusk or simply an enlarged canine?  The existing literature is quite imprecise, but saber teeth tend to be laterally compressed, whereas tusks tend to be rather round in cross section and continuously growing, such as in modern elephants, wild boars, and walruses.  Finally, the distinction of saber teeth and tusks from ordinary large canines appears to be vague and primarily based on length.  Tiarajudens seems to further blur this distinction, since anomodonts evolved both approaches (saber teeth and tusks) to enlarge their canines, even though they might have had similar functions, such as deterring predators and intraspecific display or combat.Frobish and the authors of the paper in Science2 mentioned evolution often, but only in respect to their belief that these animals evolved.  For instance, Cisneros et al said, “This discovery provides new insight into the evolution of heterogeneous dentition in therapsids and broadens our understanding of ecological interactions at the end of the Paleozoic.”  That, however, does not explain how or why saberteeth evolved in this particular animal.  They admitted that “The function of the saber teeth is unknown, but probable uses include deterring attack from predators and intraspecific display or combat.”    Evolutionists would have expected such derived features to evolve much later, not 260 million years ago.  Will they ever know without being able to watch the animals in action?  Whatever evolutionists have to say about it now, they clearly did not predict finding saber teeth so early.  Cisneros told Live Science it was “like finding a unicorn,” it was so bizarre.  “You see it, but you don’t believe it.”Early Americans:  The Clovis culture was supposed to represent the oldest human presence in North America, but now stone-tool evidence of “paleo-Indians” has been found in Texas at a level said to be 2,500 years older.  PhysOrg said this discovery is “rewriting what anthropologists know about when the first inhabitants arrived in North America.”  Michael Walters [Texas A&M] said, “This discovery challenges us to re-think the early colonization of the Americas.”A search on PhysOrg for the phrase “previously believed” turned up 2,640 results; “once thought” produced 3,860 results.1.  Jorg Frobisch, “Paleontology: On Dental Occlusion and Saber Teeth,” Science, 25 March 2011: Vol. 331 no. 6024 pp. 1525-1528, DOI: 10.1126/science.1204206.2.  Cisneros, Abdala, Rubridge, Dentzien-Dias and Bueno, “Dental Occlusion in a 260-Million-Year-Old Therapsid with Saber Canines from the Permian of Brazil,” Science, 25 March 2011: Vol. 331 no. 6024 pp. 1603-1605, DOI: 10.1126/science.1200305.Oh, but they KNOW evolution is a FACT.  Considering stories like these, on what grounds are we supposed to give the priesthood of scientists such epistemic priority that their opinions matter by default more than those of any other honest scholar in any other field of knowledge?    After all, scientists are not the only ones interested in finding the truth about nature.  When aspects of that truth are inaccessible to empirical observation, such as the history of the world, and when their stories keep changing so drastically and so often, it would seem other honest truth seekers should have a place in the discussion.(Visited 16 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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A wild beard and fierce convictions

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first_imgMany voices brought down apartheid, and writer Cornelius Thomas is determined the less-famous activists will also be remembered for their participation in the struggle. In Time with Dennis Brutus, he examines the life of the poet who stood up against oppression in all its forms, even those new oppressors who simply replaced the old guard.The late anti-apartheid activist Dennis Brutus’s last four years are poignantly captured by Cornelius Thomas in “Time with Dennis Brutus”. (Image: Michael Barry)Shamin ChibbaDennis Brutus pensively stroked his silver beard with both hands, thinking about the time in 1959 when Brazilian football club Portuguesa Santista were planning to visit South Africa to play against an all-white Western Province team. The Brazilian side was willing to drop their black players for the visit, in deference to apartheid, he said. But Brutus was not willing to let that happen.“I phoned the president [Juscelino Kubitschek] of Brazil directly,” he recalled. “I explained the situation to him, saying we could not allow racism to prevail in sport and asked him to intervene. He then cabled the team, ordering them not to play in South Africa.”This is one anecdote of many in the book, Time with Dennis Brutus, in which author Cornelius Thomas characterises the late poet, journalist and activist by two things: his unfaltering love for humanity and that beard, which he wore until his death in December 2009. Thomas’s other nonfiction works, Dust in My Coffee and Finding Freedom in the Bush of Books, give a voice to the lesser known bastions of the liberation struggle. Time with Dennis Brutus is no different.It describes the enjoyable moments he shared with Brutus in the last four years of the activist’s life. “Our conversations brought out the private and personal Dennis. I thought I had to share some of that with posterity,” the author says.A memorable recollection from the days spent with Brutus while writing his book was a visit to 20 Shell Street in North End, Port Elizabeth. Brutus and his young family lived here during apartheid while he was under a state banning order. “He wanted to pause there, I guess to reflect and reminisce a bit. We sat there for maybe 30 minutes and he told me about his family life, and how he beat his banning order. I think it was a special moment for him and certainly a poignant one for me.”Thomas first met “the man with long steel-grey hair” at the National Arts Festival in Grahamstown in 2000. He was interviewing the activist and feminist writer Lauretta Ngcobo when he bumped into Brutus. “He was not intense,” he recalls. “He was jovial and seemed a fun-loving guy. I liked him right away.”Such a first impression was in contrast to the man’s fiery activism, evident in his successful campaign to have apartheid South Africa banned from participating in the Olympic Games. “Dennis believed that the individual could make a difference. He looked into the world and saw many wrongs and he felt called to address them, without deference or political correctness,” explains Thomas. Sport as a platform for protestThe first time Brutus turned to sport as a “terrain on which to fight for fairness” was in the 1940s. At the time, Seretse Khama, a young black high jumper, was not allowed to compete against white athletes. That young athlete went on to become the first president of Botswana, and received a KBE from Queen Elizabeth. Brutus went on to set up the South African Sports Association in October 1958 with GK Rangasamy and Arthur Lutchman. The name was neutral, said Brutus, and it did not give too much away. “We stood for merit on a non-racial basis in sport.”He was banned from literary, academic and political activities in 1961, yet he went on to help establish the South African Non-Racial Olympic Committee in 1963, which led to the international sports boycott against apartheid South Africa. As a result, he was arrested and imprisoned on Robben Island. While incarcerated, he heard that South Africa had been suspended from the 1964 Tokyo Olympics.In 2007, Brutus was nominated for induction into the South African Sports Hall of Fame, which is organised by veteran rugby player Naas Botha. Ever the activist, he declined, saying: “It is incompatible to have those who championed racist sport alongside its genuine victims.” Protest poetryBrutus’s writings always had an air of protest about them. The Gale Contemporary Black Biography series described his Sirens, Knuckles and Boots, published in 1963, as his way of shouldering his own burdens in the fight against racism. It said that although his words carried a tone of dissent, his poems “lack any element of self-pity”.After serving 18 months on Robben Island, he published Letters to Martha and Other Poems from a South African Prison in 1968. Addressed to his sister-in-law, the poems were conversational and direct, so that ordinary people could understand them. This literary change came about after he spent five months in solitary confinement, during which time he “re-examined his verse and his attitudes toward creative self-expression”.Thomas explains that Brutus’s writing was inspired by the discrimination he witnessed while growing up. “I think growing up when segregation hardened and when apartheid worked its way through our social fabric, he saw wrongs everywhere: unfair discrimination, evictions, forced removals, denial of opportunity.”He was also prompted to take action by the inactivity of others. “Dennis had courage, a keen mind, and a social conscience. My book shows that even when he was in junior high, he was prepared to mobilise against wrong.”Brutus’s defiance inspired a generation of activists, including Thomas, who became an activist as a student at the University of the Western Cape. “He fought for the poor, on every frontline where greed and oppression tried to halt the march towards a more human society.” Still relevantHe may have been one of the lesser known political activists of the liberation struggle, but this does not mean Brutus’s efforts are to be ignored. According to Thomas, South Africans today need to heed his message more than ever before. Brutus believed every generation should fight against the social ills of hunger, poverty, oppression and denial of opportunity. “As a modern people, who claim to embrace the human race and a universal human rights culture, we cannot retire into privacy as if ‘the struggle’ was over,” Thomas explains.Brutus’s successor would have to be steadfast to ward off today’s challenges, Thomas says, pointing to the writer and sociologist, Ashwin Desai, as the candidate to take over from where Brutus left off. “Like Dennis, [Desai] is eloquent and fearless, and his heart is in the right place. With the poor, his body is on the line, opposing the forces of injustice and greed.”Writer and sociologist Ashwin Desai is touted as Brutus’ successor. (Image: University of Johannesburg)As for Brutus, he thought highly of Desai. Commenting on the latter’s book, We Are the Poors, Brutus described the author as one of South Africa’s leading activist intellectuals. And then, in his Dennis Brutus Memorial Lecture in Port Elizabeth in 2012, Desai returned the compliment, saying he hoped his address would take up Brutus’s challenge of querying the “form and content of the national liberation struggles” and the “democratic transition in South Africa”.Desai does not see himself as a role model. “But if a budding young activist were to look for a role model,” says Thomas, “the best I can think of is Ashwin.” South Africa todayBefore his death, Brutus was critical of the direction South Africa had taken. Thomas says the old activist felt the revolution had been betrayed and that one set of oppressors had been replaced by another. “He was deeply disturbed by the mindless embrace of neo-liberalism.”He notes that the ruling classes are crafting mythologies based on half-truths, and that activists such as Brutus are effectively being written out of the national narrative. “Any new ruling party wants to write history its way, perhaps [at the same time] marginalising or excluding others. There is much untruthfulness in such a process. And Dennis would have us speak truth to power.”Indeed, in a passage in Time with Dennis Brutus, the activist speaks honestly about present-day global challenges. At a social gathering in East London in October 2008, Brutus said people had to embrace new causes or allow them to find us. “We live in new realities today and we must tackle, politically, the challenges of the day – corporate greed, globalisation, the depletion of the earth’s resources.”He was an activist until his dying breath, aiming to attend the 2009 UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen. According to Thomas, Brutus believed climate justice was humanity’s new cause. Sadly, he did not make it to Denmark – he died in his sleep at the age of 85.Though Thomas’s book is an attempt to hold on to Brutus’s legacy, he does not intend on being the messenger for the latter’s ideologies. Instead, he leaves those theories to academics and their dissertations. Thomas prefers to share Brutus’s voice with generations to come. “My book is but a friendly salute to him. To thank him for allowing me into his company, into his thoughts, and, I would like to think, into his heart.”last_img read more

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Code Camp Bitmaker Labs Gets Legal

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first_imglauren orsini Related Posts Days after it came to light that Bitmaker Labs might be breaking Canadian law, the Toronto-based coding school is working with the Ontario government towards getting itself in the clear.Ontario’s Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities (MTCU) sent inspectors to the coding bootcamp after it heard about it through positive press in the Globe and Mail. The governing body was concerned that Bitmaker Labs, which runs a nine-week boot camp that students pay $9,000 to attend, was running an unregulated private college. (See also Canadian Province Cracks Down On Coding Schools)Heather Payne, who runs another Toronto coding school called HackerYou, explained in a blog post that, under the 2005 Private Career Colleges Act, programs that cost more than $1,000 or last for more than 40 hours are legally private colleges. (This is also why the cheaper, shorter HackerYou will not face an investigation.)Who’s Really Helping Entrepreneurs?Many of Bitmaker Labs’ supporters have taken to Twitter to decry the MTCU for “stifling” innovation in business. Brad Duguid, the Minister of Training, Colleges, and University, released a statement to ReadWrite that defends the ministry’s actions. “The Ontario government is a champion of entrepreneurs and as such, we will do everything to help Ontario’s innovators and entrepreneurs succeed,” he said. “Of course, Bitmaker will need to register, just like everyone else—and they are currently in the process of doing that. I hope that this matter will be resolved very soon.”A Burden For Startup Code SchoolsBitmaker Labs cofounder Matt Gray confirmed to ReadWrite that the process is ongoing, but that it’s lengthy and arduous. “The registration process is extremely burdensome for a startup and the costs can be quite substantial,” Gray said. “It’s also necessary to include approved examinations and assessments. The regulatory hurdles can take a lot of time.”Nevertheless, Gray plans to cooperate fully and get Bitmaker Labs regulated as quickly as possible. They may be shut down temporarily, but he said there are no hard feelings.“Brad is a great guy and wants to fuel the entrepreneurial community here in Ontario,” he said. “I’m confident we’ll be able to resolve this issue in a timely manner. The government has indicated their willingness to work with us. We’re excited to change education and help build the startup ecosystem in Canada.”Photo of Matt Gray with students courtesy of Bitmaker Labs Why You Love Online Quizzes Tags:#Bitmaker Labs#education#Toronto Tech center_img 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoidlast_img read more

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Red-hot Alab torches lowly Formosa for 8th straight win

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first_imgPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netSan Miguel Alab Pilipinas couldn’t be stopped as it ran roughshod over Formosa Dreamers, 117-93, for its eighth straight victory in the 2018 ASEAN Basketball League at Sta. Rosa Multipurpose Complex in Laguna.The hottest team in the league banked on its versatile imports to improve to 11-4 in the standings.ADVERTISEMENT Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC MOST READ View comments John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding LATEST STORIES Familiarity helped Meralco’s Ballesteros in career game vs Ginebra NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers Justin Brownlee was as lethal as ever, firing 27 points and scattering 13 rebounds, five assists, four blocks, and two steals to stuff the stat sheets in the rout.Renaldo Balkman also registered another double-double of 21 markers and 14 boards that went with six dimes, and five rejections, while Lawrence Domingo fired a season-high 16 points and seven rebounds.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutBobby Ray Parks Jr. also shone as he helped Alab break away for good in the third quarter, where he unloaded eight of his 15 points that triggered a 19-7 tear for a decisive 79-62 lead. The reigning Local MVP also got three rebounds, two assists, and two steals.The tailspin continued for the Dreamers, who have now lost 12 games in a row and stayed at the cellar with a 1-14 slate.center_img AFP official booed out of forum Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting Cameron Forte topped Formosa with 29 points and 21 rebounds, Ronnie Aguilar had 20 markers and 11 boards, and local Wu Sung Wei got 18 points and five assists off the bench.The scores:SAN MIGUEL ALAB PILIPINAS 117 — Brownlee 27, Balkman 21, Domingo 16, Parks 15, Hontiveros 11, Sumalinog 11, Urbiztondo 9, Raymundo 3, Alabanza 2, Javelona 2, Celiz 0.FORMOSA DREAMERS 93 — Forte 29, Aguilar 20, Wu 18, Chen 10, Chien 7, Chou 4, Barratt 3, Yang 2, Cheng 0, Li C 0, Li P 0, Tsai 0.Quarters: 28-19, 52-38, 79-66, 117-93.ADVERTISEMENT Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises Read Next Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon Citylast_img read more

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Menina leaves Mapua, transfers to NU

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first_imgUnesco partners with PSC to improve Children’s Games The Cebuano guard confirmed his supposed transfer, sharing that he has already enrolled in the Jhocson-based campus.“Yes, I’m already in NU. I also want to play in the UAAP,” said Menina in Filipino.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsMapua coach Atoy Co is aware of the development as he braces for NCAA Season 93 without Menina.The Cardinals have already suffered a huge blow with reigning two-time NCAA MVP Allwell Oraeme opting to sit out this season. MOST READ Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ China furious as Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong Another vape smoker nabbed in Lucena Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES View comments Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend LOOK: Jane De Leon meets fellow ‘Darna’ Marian Rivera Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Menina averaged 8.9 points on a 27.3-percent shooting from three, to go with 1.8 rebounds, 3.3 assists in his sophomore year in Mapua, as the Cardinals advanced to the Final Four for the second straight season.He will sit out this upcoming UAAP Season 80, but will be eligible to play for three years for the Bulldogs. Nikki Valdez rushes self to ER due to respiratory tract infection Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netDarell Menina is now a Bulldog.The 5-foot-8 playmaker has transferred from Mapua University to his new home in National University, leaving the Cardinals where he spent his first two years in the collegiate level.ADVERTISEMENT Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity.last_img read more

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McGrady, Lobo, Self and McGraw headline Hall of Fame class

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first_imgJackson talked about being born in a box car in Missouri and rising to become a player and later a successful business executive and owner of the Globetrotters. His was the most political speech of the night, calling for unity in a divided nation, saying he does not believe the country can endure if it does not cast indifference, hatred and bigotry aside.“If basketball can be a showcase for non-discrimination, for integration, for performance-based emotions, why can’t we do that over in every part of our society?” he asked.Lobo and McGraw celebrated the growth of women’s basketball. McGraw became just the sixth women’s coach to be enshrined.“I’m grateful for Title IX and the opportunities that it’s given to women like me, who dreamed of a future where we could do the same job as a man, where playing a game could lead to a 40-year career,” she said.Lobo told a story about when her oldest daughter, Siobhan, was 5 years old and saw her father watching a UConn men’s game. She said to him, “I didn’t know boys play basketball too.”Self, 54, told The Associated Press he feels a little uncomfortable being enshrined in the middle of his career, which includes nine 30-win seasons and an NCAA championship in 2008“I hope it doesn’t mean that I’m on my last leg yet,” he said. “I think this will be motivation to try and validate it, always. I’ll work harder now that ever to validate being thought of with these other fraternity members.”Self spent part of his speech listing the Kansas basketball coaching greats in the Hall of Fame.“James Naismith, Phog Allen, Larry Brown, Roy Williams and me; what is wrong with that picture?” he joked.Jernstedt, credited with overseeing the growth of the Division I men’s tournament and the creation of the women’s tournament, acknowledged to reporters that his class doesn’t include a superstar name like Michael Jordan or Shaquille O’Neal, but said he is impressed with what this class has meant to the sport. NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Tracy McGrady raises his fists as he takes the stage for his enshrinement into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, Friday, Sept. 8, 2017, in Springfield, Mass. McGrady is a seven-time NBA All-Star and a two-time NBA scoring champion who played for seven NBA teams in his 16-season pro career. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)SPRINGFIELD, Mass. — Tracy McGrady says his wife, Clerenda, has been trying to get him to say that he deserves to be in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.The seven-time NBA All-Star and two-time league scoring champion couldn’t bring himself to do that, until Friday night.ADVERTISEMENT “I didn’t know three of four of these people very well at all before, but the contributions they’ve made are so impressive,” he said. “Hopefully now, more people will understand that and reach out and learn more about them.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim LATEST STORIES MOST READ Former Chicago Bulls general manager Jerry Krause, and former Globetrotter and New York Rens player Zack Clayton were honored posthumously.McGrady had earlier told reporters his celebration was being tempered by the impact of Hurricane Harvey on his family and neighbors in Texas.His estate in Sugar Land, Texas, suffered only minor damage from the storm, allowing him and his wife to take in the families of five relatives and friends for three days after mandatory evacuations. He also put on a Labor Day feast at a church in the Houston area for about 800 victims of the storm.“My sister was at the house, and I was trying to take her home and driving to her house. Just seeing cars under water and you don’t know if people are in there — it’s real,” he told reporters. “I’m being as vocal and proactive as I can.”Other inductees were vocal about other issues Friday night.ADVERTISEMENT Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side He went to the podium during his induction pumping his fists in the air as the crowd chanted “T-Mac,” then celebrated his 15 years in the league.“On this day, I can finally say, ’Yes I deserve to be here,’” said McGrady, who played for seven teams, starring with Toronto, Orlando and Houston. “I am truly humbled. I’m grateful and proud to be in the class of 2017.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingMcGrady was among 11 basketball greats enshrined Friday night.The class also includes former ABA and NBA star George McGinnis, former UConn and WNBA star Rebecca Lobo, Kansas men’s coach Bill Self, Notre Dame women’s coach Muffet McGraw, former Texas high school coach Robert Hughes, former Harlem Globetrotters player and now owner Mannie Jackson, NCAA administrator Tom Jernstedt and former European star Nick Galis. Pau Gasol becomes career scoring leader in EuroBasket View commentslast_img read more

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