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FLU CONFERENCE COVERAGE New disease-control rules follow reminders of risks

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first_imgJun 18, 2007 – TORONTO (CIDRAP News) – Ten years after H5N1 avian influenza first began to raise fears of a potential pandemic, the world has a stronger set of tools to contain that virus and similar threats, but also a fresh awareness of humanity’s vulnerability to fast-spreading diseases, experts said yesterday at an international conference on flu. Heymann said the old rules “were actually a very passive system” and “a system which countries did not adhere to. Very few countries would report diseases under the International Health Regulations because when they reported those [three] diseases, or any other diseases for that matter, they were penalized with decreased trade and decreased tourism.” “We really are not much further ahead today than we were in 1918,” Dr. David Heymann, the WHO’s assistant director-general for communicable diseases, said in the conference’s keynote address. “We don’t have the vaccines we need. . . . We have some antivirals. But we do have one thing that we did not have in 1918, and that is the International Health Regulations, that now provide for proactive collective action for the H5N1 threat to global public health security.” The Options for the Control of Influenza Conference takes place in Toronto this week on the 10th anniversary of the first human cases of H5N1 flu, which were discovered in Hong Kong between May and December 1997, and one month after the multi-country odyssey of an Atlanta lawyer infected with an almost untreatable form of tuberculosis. The new rules also encourage countries to enforce disease control at their borders while respecting the rights of international travelers. And they reinforce countries’ responsibility to report and contain disease by allowing states to look over each other’s fences: For the first time, the WHO will accept reports of outbreaks not only from national governments but also from third parties ranging from Internet search engines to other states. During the 2003 SARS outbreak, for instance, Southeast Asia lost an estimated $18 billion in gross domestic product and possibly $60 billion in revenues and demand, Heymann said. The new rules, which were enacted in 2005 and became effective Jun 15, update an earlier and much weaker set of regulations that have been in force since 1969. In a change from the earlier rules—which emphasized control of only cholera, plague, and yellow fever—they commit WHO members to monitoring all potential public health threats, and particularly emphasize smallpox, polio, SARS, and novel flu strains, including H5N1. “It is important to maintain vigilance and not get so focused on one threat, like H5N1, that we don’t miscue on the emergence and virulence of another,” Dr. David Butler-Jones, Canada’s chief public health officer, said at the conference opener. He called the XDR TB patient’s four-country odyssey “a stark reminder of our collective vulnerability to communicable diseases. . . . The world seems to continue to be smaller, with diseases having no respect for borders, cultures or politics.” See also: Conference attendees said the porousness of borders to disease has been sharply underlined by two recent events: the emergence on the Wales-England border of an H7N2 strain of avian flu that infected at least four humans and killed a number of poultry despite being judged “low pathogenic,” and the saga of Andrew Speaker, who detoured through several countries so that he could obtain treatment in the United States for his newly diagnosed case of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB). The new regulations improve on the old not only by emphasizing more diseases but also by committing states to building up their public health infrastructure so they can detect and respond to outbreaks, and to maintaining real-time surveillance of health information so that it can be transmitted to the WHO within 24 hours. But the conference’s opening ceremonies yesterday evening also came 2 days after the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) new International Health Regulations took effect. The voluntary contract marks the first time that the WHO’s 193 member states have agreed to immediately acknowledge and attempt to control any public health emergencies—in their own country or any other territory—that could provoke international concern. Jun 15 CIDRAP News story “New global disease-control rules take effect”last_img read more

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Franklin County Humane Society’s to host fall shot clinics

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first_imgBrookville, IN—Time for the Franklin County Humane Society’s fall shot clinic. There are two dates and locations this year. The October 12 clinic is at the Franklin County Fairgrounds as usual, and on October 26 there will be another clinic at the Laurel Firehouse Station. Fairground clinic is from 1:00 to 3:00 pm, and Laurel is from 10:00 am to 12:00 pm. All dogs must be leashed and cats in carriers, please. This is for everyone’s safety. Cash, credit card or check with accepted with proper I.D.  All vaccines are $12.00, except the Bordetella (canine kennel cough) which is $15.00, I.D. chipping is $20.00, and flea & worming treatments are done by the weight of the dog or cat.  Please don’t forget to spay & neuter. FCHS does monthly transports for this service as well.last_img read more

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Trash tax

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first_imgRe: “Trash-fee hike passes council committee vote” (May 11): Wendy Greuel, the City Council and Mayor Villaraigosa obstinately refuse to listen to all the complaints, i.e., multiple Daily News letters and editorials every day against raising trash fees to ostensibly hire more police. The politicians need to be stopped from abusing their power to raise maintenance fees to add to the general fund, which may and probably will not later be used for subjects that are correctly the subjects of taxation. They fear they cannot raise the tax for the same police issue, so they resort to trickery. Without voter approval, they can fee/tax homeowners for whatever they want and there is damn little anyone can do about it. Remember to vote against these money-hungry power grabbers. – Steven Hungerford If the City Council and mayor wanted this city to have more police officers, then it would have done so. This fee hike is unwanted and unwarranted. – Karen Jackson Valley Village LAPD successes Re: “Cop decree likely will stay in toto” (May 12): Of course, Michael Cherkasky and his consulting firm Kroll Inc. would like to see the full consent decree extended. In 2001, Cherkasky and his firm received the contract to monitor the consent decree’s progress and have been paid millions. Their contract expires this year. Under the leadership of Chief Bratton, the LAPD is more transparent, accountable and has made great strides in its community policing efforts. The LAPD should be commended for its successes, not criticized or punished. – Monica Harmon Los Angeles Eliminate civil service Re: “Acid dumped by school workers” (May 11): Some morons in the Los Angeles Unified School District throw out hydrochloric acid. Not only that, they throw out stopwatches and other new stuff. It just shows how incompetent these LAUSD people are. If they had real jobs, these people would be fired already. But as other Daily News articles show, government employees don’t get fired. The concept of civil service needs to be eliminated. Let the idiots get fired like people at real jobs do. Let Mayor Tony run the LAUSD. He can’t do any worse. Then the LAUSD people can move on to jobs in the Bush administration. They’ll fit right in. – Mike Kirwan Venice Need more laws Re: “Report: 43 placed near Disneyland” (May 11): Putting sex offenders near “the Happiest Place on Earth” is just one of many reasons we need more laws to protect our kids. I know of a heroin user that’s been arrested six times for prostitution and drugs who lives across the street from the front gate of an LAUSD school. Why do our lawmakers let this happen? – Rudolfo Campos Granada Hills Fats Domino Re: “Jazz Fest plays without Fats” (May 8): As a Southland teenager in the “Nifty ’50s,” a great pleasure was toolin’ over to Music City, Sunset and Vine, where you sometimes waited for more than an hour for a booth to hear Fats, Rick, Nat and Elvis. Groovy greats for free. Until Hurricane Katrina, I’d not realized that Fats Domino was still alive. Despite his not feeling well, and the fact he had to cancel his Sunday performance, just to see his smiling face brought me back to the days of my youth. At age 78, let’s hope this great talent still has many years ahead. – Eddie Cress Sylmar The honor system Re: “Prove you can vote” (Your Opinions, May 11): I agree with Ruth Watson that our “honor system” has many flaws when it comes to the right to vote. I worked the polls for several years and was horrified that there was no way we could ask if someone was legally allowed to vote. The area I worked in had many “voters” who spoke no English and we were required to provide interpreters if so requested. I must take it on faith the Registrar’s Office has thoroughly checked out anyone who has registered to vote, but I have little faith in them doing so. Because of this concern, I no longer work the polls, but I make sure that I do vote in every election. – Toni O’Brien North Hills How rude Re: “Level of discourse” (Your Opinions, May 11): Yikes, in regard to Walter Starkey’s churlish letter lambasting my opinion and my intelligence on the subject of the rude, self-righteous, biased, etc., tone of many post-May 1 letters in the Daily News, I must thank him for proving my point. His letter meets all the criteria and more; much more. – Eileen O’Neill West Hills Minuteman cartoon I think your rendition of the Minuteman on the May 7 Viewpoint cover was totally out of place. Realize that these people are attempting to do a job which our spineless leaders in Washington refuse to do, as we might “offend” someone on the other side of the border. Is it true that those same “leaders” in Washington are informing the Mexican government of the whereabouts of the Minutemen along the border? If so, isn’t that called treason? (Offering assistance to the enemy – doesn’t an “enemy” include someone who enters our country illegally?) – Roy H. Stratton Woodland Hills TV wasteland I applaud reader Bette Simons for speaking out about the sad state of television these days – but my opinion differs somewhat slightly: today’s television isn’t any more risque or offensive than present-day society tolerates – it’s just become intolerably uninteresting, unimaginative and downright boring. Let’s face it, unless you happen to enjoy dramas about police work or the medical field, an uninspired karaoke contest that’s now inexplicably in the midst of its fifth season or a group of total strangers “being themselves” (this so-called “reality television”), you’re pretty much out of luck. Thank heavens for the creators of shows like “Family Guy,” one of just a handful of remaining cutting-edge shows that represents the last vestige of creative television. – Tom Atkins Sherman Oaks Affordable housing Affordable housing is an endangered commodity on the brink of extinction. Along with rights accorded us through laws comes responsibilities. Landlords proclaim their rights, but abrogate their responsibilities. This glutting tide of condominiums does not create housing where none existed before. Our City Council should introduce ameliorative constraints as the “cost of doing business.” Without comprehensive, even visionary, leadership from our council, there is no equalizing force. We aren’t clamoring: “House us.” Just keep it possible for us to do it for ourselves with a modicum of dignity. – Carol Garfield Valley Village Hasn’t been proved Nothing bad has ever been proved to have been caused by global warming. You’ve heard the expression, “Keep your theology off my biology”? Well, I say, “Keep your politics off our science.” – Richard W. Allen Granada Hills ——— How to write to us We welcome letters on all issues of public concern. All are subject to editing and condensation, and they can be published only with the writer’s true name. Only the writer’s home community, rather than full address, will be published. Letters must include the writer’s complete home address and daytime telephone number for verification purposes. Please limit letters to 100 words. Letters and columns that are submitted and for which no compensation was paid may be republished in digital and other formats and retained in archives, without compensation to the author. Mail letters to: Public Forum, P.O. Box 4200, Woodland Hills, CA 91365-4200 Fax: (818) 713-3723 E-mail: dnforum@dailynews.com Our Opinions reflect the opinion of the newspaper as an institution. Your Opinions are the personal opinions of readers of the newspaper. Their Opinions express the personal opinion of the writers. dailynews.com For the weekend package of local, state and national columns, editorials and Public Forum, go to Opinions section of dailynews.com.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBasketball roundup: Sierra Canyon, Birmingham set to face off in tournament quarterfinalsTujunga City’s pipe dream Re: “Trash-fee hike passes council committee vote” (May 11): We are continually being told that trash fees are $11 – which is untrue. We are charged $11 times the amount of cans we have. If you have two cans, you are charged $22; three cans, $33; etc. The trash fee hike is applied to every $11 increment, depending on the number of cans. We have been given the city’s pipe dream about “1,000 police officers” for a very long time and it has never come to fruition. The city of Los Angeles finds the money for what it wants. It found millions for the homeless; it even found thousands for Chinese monkeys a few years ago. last_img read more

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