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Waltrip races into Daytona 500 field

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first_imgNASCAR tossed out two key Waltrip employees, handed crew chief David Hyder a $100,000 fine – the largest in series history – and docked Waltrip 100 points. But NASCAR didn’t kick him out of the garage, something other drivers questioned. “To tell you the truth, I think he got off easy,” Joe Nemechek said. “It gave the sport a black eye. I think Michael Waltrip is very fortunate to be in this race.” Waltrip expected that reaction from some and said president Mike Helton encouraged him to race Thursday when all Waltrip wanted to do was go home and hide. “I came real close to not racing today,” Waltrip said hours before his qualifying event. “I just felt like there would be a cloud over whatever I accomplished today because of what happened.” He was contrite at his morning news conference, and that didn’t change after he secured his spot in the field. Toyota officials, conspicuously absent in his morning apology session, gathered around him after the race. “I couldn’t be happier for Michael and his organization. … What a turn of events,” said Lee White, general manager of Toyota Racing Development. “Michael Waltrip carried two cars in – that’s 7,000 pounds – a pretty heavy load for the guy.” Teammate Dale Jarrett rushed to Waltrip’s side on a chaotic pit road, grabbing his boss in a bear hug. “Proud of you. Want you to know that,” Jarrett said. “I appreciate that,” Waltrip said, lips quivering. “I knew you could handle it, anyway,” Jarrett replied. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – Michael Waltrip cheated, apologized and then vindicated himself the only way he knew how: He drove his way into the Daytona 500. The two-time Daytona winner – almost too embarrassed to get behind the wheel after his team was caught in NASCAR’s biggest cheating scandal – capped a roller-coaster week Thursday by earning a spot in the Great American Race. Because of NASCAR’s complicated qualifying format for this event, it also guaranteed rookie David Reutimann a spot along with the two other Toyota Camrys that Waltrip owns. Reutimann would have had to race his way in otherwise. But there was little celebration at the finish line, where Waltrip sat stone-faced inside his car as he battled a wave of conflicting emotions. “I’m probably the most depressed guy you have ever seen make the Daytona 500,” he said with a sigh. “I’m thankful. I’m sad. I’m happy at the same time. Daytona does that to you.” So does cheating. Waltrip’s humiliating debut with Toyota began Sunday when NASCAR found a suspicious substance in his intake manifold. After three days of examination, it was determined to be a fuel additive designed to dramatically boost horsepower in a car that previously had struggled with speed. center_img “I know I am good enough to do it without having any cheating on my car,” he said. “I don’t need it. I can go fast without it. I think we proved that today.” Waltrip’s eighth-place finish in the first qualifying race at Daytona International Speedway was good enough to get him in the field. last_img read more

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Key narcolepsy–influenza vaccine findings retracted

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first_imgFollowing the 2009 swine flu pandemic, roughly one out of 15,000 children in Europe who received the H1N1 vaccine called Pandemrix developed narcolepsy, a disorder that causes irresistible sleepiness. A leading explanation for the rash of narcolepsy cases is that a fragment of the H1N1 virus used to produce Pandemrix may have triggered an autoimmune reaction in some vulnerable children. Researchers have struggled to find evidence for that hypothesis, however. This week, the picture grew murkier when Stanford University researchers retracted a paper in Science Translational Medicine, published 18 December 2013, that was hailed as the first evidence to support the immunological hypothesis. After several attempts, scientists say they are unable to replicate a key part of the experiment.For more, see the full story in this week’s issue of Science.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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