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Archives for: July 31, 2019

The Equality and Human Rights Commission EHRC is

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first_imgThe Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) is to write to Manchester United and football’s Premier League after Disability News Service (DNS) passed on concerns that disabled fans had had their mobility aids confiscated by stewards.Staff at Manchester United’s Old Trafford ground tried to stop several Arsenal fans – including one supporter in his 80s – from taking their seats because they were using walking sticks, which stewards claimed could be used as weapons.They were visiting Britain’s richest football club to watch what was billed as one of the biggest matches of the season, on 17 May.The stewards told the London club’s disabled supporters that they would not be allowed to watch the match because they had not alerted the club about their equipment in advance.They claimed the fans could also pose a health and safety risk in the event of a stadium evacuation.The disabled supporters were only allowed into the stadium to take their seats after the intervention of an officer from Greater Manchester police.But after they had been escorted to their seats, their sticks were confiscated and held by stewards until the end of the match, on 17 May.After DNS asked the EHRC to comment, it said today (Friday) that it was writing urgently to both Manchester United and the Premier League to raise concerns about the treatment of disabled fans. It warned that it had not ruled out legal action.A police spokesman confirmed the incident had taken place and that the Arsenal fans had only been allowed into the stadium after the officer called the stadium control room to seek clarification of the ground regulations.The spokesman said: “He was told if able, the supporters could use their walking aids to reach their seats and these would then be stored by stewards throughout the game and returned post match.”But he declined to comment when asked if the force was comfortable with the club’s policy.Manchester Utd has been repeatedly criticised for failing to provide the recommended number of spaces for wheelchair-users at Old Trafford.It admitted last August that it only had 120 wheelchair spaces, when official guidance states that there should be at least 280.A Manchester Utd spokesman said: “Our club policy is to encourage any supporters who require the use of crutches or a walking aid to contact the club in advance to ensure each case is adequately risk assessed and that we can ensure safe evacuation in the event of emergency.“On some rare occasions, we have also experienced such devices being used as weapons.“This policy is displayed at the turnstiles and on our website. The disability liaison officers from both clubs also communicate this policy in advance.“Where supporters arrive without having pre-notified us of the need for such devices, our stewarding team performs a dynamic risk assessment which usually involves finding a solution to accompany the supporter to their seat and storing the walking device during the game.“At the game in question, a significant number of visiting supporters who had not pre-notified the club arrived with walking devices.“Therefore the above system was put into place. No person was refused entry to the stadium.”When asked whether the club would be apologising to the disabled fans, and whether it was concerned that it might have breached the Equality Act, the spokesman refused to comment further.Speaking before the news emerged of the EHRC’s action, a spokesperson for Level Playing Field (LPF), the user-led organisation that works to improve access to sporting venues, said: “Manchester United is, by all accounts, the only Premier League club with this policy.“LPF would always advise clubs not to confiscate walking aids (such as walking sticks or crutches) from disabled fans and believes that such a practice may even be deemed as discriminatory.”Rebecca Hilsenrath, chief legal officer at the EHRC, told DNS: “Over the past months, we have received a number of complaints about provision for disabled fans at the Premier League.  “This has included discriminatory policies that prevent disabled fans having the same opportunities to attend football matches as non-disabled people.“Complaints have been about disabled fans being prevented from obtaining season tickets, a lack of adequate space for wheelchair-users, and problems for families with young disabled children being unable to sit together to enjoy a game.  “Some of the most recent complaints have concerned Manchester United and the removal of walking aids from disabled away fans. “We are writing to both the Premier League and to Manchester United today to seek urgent assurances that disabled fans will be treated fairly and equally as the law requires. “We are also seeking urgent meetings with them to clear up the issues which have been identified and agree commitments to early progress.” She added: “Premier League clubs have a legal duty under the Equality Act 2010 to ensure reasonable adjustment for disabled fans and to make sure they do not discriminate against them in the provision of goods and services.“While our preference is always to work with organisations to avoid costly legal proceedings, all options remain on the table because disabled fans deserve better.”A spokeswoman for the Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) said: “We can’t comment on specific incidents at clubs as we don’t know the facts.”But she added: “The SGSA believes disabled fans should be able to support their team and have access into sports grounds.”She said the authority did not have the regulatory powers to take action against a club for anything other than breaching the rule that Premier League and Championship clubs have to be all-seater stadiums.She added: “The SGSA’s aim is to ensure the safety of all spectators at sports grounds. We strongly promote accessibility at sports grounds and have created guidance that sets out the standards for accessible provision at stadiums.“We are working with our partners at the Department for Culture Media and Sport and Level Playing Field to promote the importance of accessibility at sports grounds.“We use our influence on safety advisory groups to promote accessibility and any other issues that we think need to be improved.”But she added: “As it currently stands, it is down to the individual to take action against a club if they feel they have been discriminated against.”An Arsenal spokesman said: “We are sorry to hear of the difficulties experienced by our disabled supporters and will be working closely with our travelling fans to avoid any similar situations next season.”He declined to comment further.Picture: Old Trafford by Wikistadiums.org is licensed under https://creativecommons.org/last_img read more

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Kneeling Kaepernick Mural Painted in Mission District

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first_img 0% The building, located at 1899 Mission St. near 15th Street, had its window smashed two months ago, said Amy Kozlowski, an employee of the building’s new tenant. She returned to the building on Monday and found the Kapernick mural painted over plywood she had nailed to the broken window. “The first reaction was, ‘That’s awesome,’” said Kozlowski, a project manager with the coworking space company Impact Hub, which is planning a move there in early 2017. “I think it’s a beautifully done mural and they’re reflecting Kaepernick’s statement.”The 49ers quarterback has been kneeling during the national anthem of football games since August 26 to protest the treatment of minorities by the police.The Kaepernick mural was painted after another mural from Precita Eyes that Impact Hub commissioned some six months ago had to be painted over, Kozlowski said. That mural — of Disney characters, one holding an anti-eviction sign — was ruined when someone smashed the building’s window with a brick, she said. Kozlowski was forced to board up the window and paint over the mural when it was defaced with graffiti — which began occurring weekly.Kozlowski said she does not know who the artist is, who left a “Dino 2016” signature on the mural, but was appreciative of the artwork. She hopes the Kaepernick mural will stay as long as possible, but it will have to be removed when Impact Hub moves into the building and she removes the plywood covering the broken window. Impact Hub is planning to move from its SoMa location in February or March next year, she said, but until that time she invited others to beautify the side of the building.“I would welcome all artists to do the other side of the building,” she said. “It would only be for a few months, but if someone wants to do something where there’s no profanity, I would love to encourage any one who wants to paint something on the other side.”Kaepernick has faced intense backlash for the protest, including from the San Francisco Police Officers Association, the police union, which sent a letter to the National Football League asking that the quarterback apologize for his protest. The Santa Clara police officers union even suggested its officers may boycott security at football games as a result. In the Mission District at least, which has seen three controversial police shootings in the last two and a half years, Kaepernick’s actions were better received. Football players at Mission High knelt in solidarity with Kaepernick last month with the support of their coach and principal.Many of the players spoke of their own experiences being racially profiled by police officers in San Francisco.The captain of the team, who is from the Bayview-Hunter’s Point, said the black community has been affected by the December 2015 fatal police shooting of Mario Woods. The shooting sparked city-wide protests against the then-police chief, Greg Suhr, who resigned in May after another fatal police shooting in the Bayview.The student said he felt unsafe to be around police officers since the Woods shooting.In the Bayview, another mural supporting Kaepernick was painted recently, according to Hoodline. The Bayview mural is similar to the Mission one but has the caption “Believe the Message, Not the Hype.” Colin Kaepernick’s protest against police brutality landed in the Mission District this week, when a mural of him kneeling was painted on the side of an empty building. Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

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Was Apollo 11 a Beginning or an End

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first_img Subscribe now, or to get 10 days of free access, sign up with your email. Cancel anytime. If you fill out the first name, last name, or agree to terms fields, you will NOT be added to the newsletter list. Leave them blank to get signed up. This Week in Texas(Weekly)The best stories from Texas Monthly Sign UpI agree to the terms and conditions. NASA, too, has developed something of a global consciousness. The agency may be best known today for its unmanned exploration of the solar system and the Hubble Space Telescope’s photographs of distant galaxies and black holes, but NASA also closely monitors the earth. It was a NASA scientist, James Hansen, who spurred global awareness of climate change with his dramatic 1988 testimony to Congress, and the agency’s Earth Science division has used a global network of satellites to track our planet’s changing atmospheric conditions. Even now, under the direct control of a White House that has sought to undermine climate science, the agency remains clear-eyed. NASA’s website documents the warming of Earth’s oceans, the shrinking of our ice sheets, and the growing prevalence of extreme weather events. The agency has no doubt about the cause: “most of it is extremely likely (greater than 95 percent probability) to be the result of human activity since the mid-20th century.”If the Apollo program’s great achievement was to demonstrate that with enough money, courage, and scientific know-how we can do what seems impossible, then perhaps its example can help us tackle the great challenge that NASA sees bearing down on our planet right now. This would, in fact, be in keeping with Apollo’s history.Toward the end of Chasing the Moon, Stone shows archival footage of the Apollo 11 crew’s worldwide goodwill tour. The astronauts have suddenly become international heroes, and everywhere they go, adoring throngs greet them. At press conferences, reporters ask Armstrong and Aldrin how it felt to be there. They often struggle with the answer, but in Stone’s film, we watch the habitually taciturn Armstrong respond to one such question with poetry.“As we looked up from the surface of the moon  we could see above us the planet Earth, and it was very small, but it was very beautiful,” Armstrong says to the crowd of foreign reporters. “And it looked like an oasis in the heavens. And we thought it was very important, at that point, for us and men everywhere to save that planet, as a beautiful oasis that we together can enjoy, for all the future.”  Last Name The plan seemed preposterous. John F. Kennedy was just 43 years old, and he’d been president of the United States for just four months—a rough four months. So far, his attempt to overthrow Fidel Castro had ended in quick and utter disaster at the Bay of Pigs, and the Soviet Union had beaten the U.S. to outer space, launching cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin into orbit and bringing him home onto the Russian steppe. Now here was Kennedy, on the afternoon of May 25, 1961, in front of a joint session of Congress, offering up what his national security adviser, McGeorge Bundy, had referred to as a “grandstand play.”“I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth,” Kennedy said.Congress greeted Kennedy’s cri de coeur with a smattering of applause. The president’s longtime speechwriter, Ted Sorensen, thought Kennedy sensed that “the audience was skeptical if not hostile.” A Gallup poll taken a week before the speech found that only 33 percent of Americans thought the nation should spend an estimated $40 billion to land a man on the moon. (The final bill ended up being $25 billion allocated over the course of a decade, about $180 billion in today’s dollars.)Fiscal conservatives fumed. “We’re going to go broke with this nonsense!” remarked the president’s own father, former Securities and Exchange Commission chairman Joseph Kennedy. Scientists thought Kennedy’s proposed time span was fanciful. The Austrian theoretical physicist Hans Thirring told U.S. News and World Report, “I am quite sure it will not be done within the next 10 years, and I think it very likely not to happen within the next 30 years or 40 years.” And social reformers would come to see the Apollo program as a drain on needed resources. Whitney Young, president of the National Urban League, noted that America could “lift every poor person in the country above the official poverty standard” for a fraction of the cost of putting two men on the moon.   But on July 16, 1969, five and a half months before the end of the decade, a million people packed the beaches and highways of the Atlantic coast of Central Florida to watch the launch of Apollo 11. That morning, Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins had woken up long before dawn and eaten the traditional NASA pre-mission breakfast of steak and eggs. As 9:32 a.m. approached, the three astronauts were sitting in their cramped command module atop a 363-foot, three-stage Saturn V rocket, going through their final preparations before countdown. Television viewers in 33 different countries watched as the Saturn V’s five engines reached their maximum thrust of 7.6 million pounds, lurching the spaceship into the air. For the next four days, the world kept following the mission’s progress as the crew flew 230,000 miles, entered the moon’s orbit, and finally touched down on the dusty lunar surface. “Houston, Tranquility Base here,” Armstrong reported back to Earth. “The Eagle has landed.” Subscribe The State of Texas(Daily)A daily digest of Texas news, plus the latest from Texas Monthly Hope you enjoyed your free ride. To get back in the saddle, subscribe! Why am I seeing this?center_img Never Miss a StorySign up for Texas Monthly’s State of Texas newsletter to get stories like this delivered to your inbox daily. You’ve read your last free article Enter your email address First Name Editor’s Desk(Monthly)A message from the editors at Texas Monthly Sign up for free access Apollo 11 was immediately celebrated as a signal human achievement. Greeting Armstrong, Aldrin, and Collins after they returned to Earth, President Richard Nixon said, “This is the greatest week in the history of the world since the Creation!” And in the decades since, the moon landing has only grown in reputation. NASA has called it humanity’s “single greatest technological achievement of all time,” and polling has shown a steady increase in the public’s belief that the space program was worth its high cost. Pop culture touchstones like The Right Stuff and Apollo 13 have celebrated the courage and resourcefulness of the original astronauts and the genius of the engineers and scientists who powered them into the heavens. Watch oversaturated 1960s footage of one of those mighty Saturn V rockets erupting off the ground and try not to swoon.   But as the moon landing’s fiftieth anniversary nears, new books and documentaries have arrived to remind us that our great American space epic was not, in fact, a frictionless succession of missions accomplished and ticker-tape parades. Even the most hagiographic offerings have moments that serve as correctives to our rose-tinted public memory. Shoot for the Moon: The Space Race and the Extraordinary Voyage of Apollo 11, by the Dallas writer James Donovan, is a largely familiar tale, a greatest-hits retelling of the Space Age from Sputnik to the moon landing. Donovan thrills at the celebrity of the Mercury Seven; mourns the deaths of Apollo 1 crew Gus Grissom, Ed White, and Roger Chaffee; and, in the book’s best section, delivers a bravura ticktock of Apollo 11, with the Mission Control pencil pushers watching anxiously through thick clouds of cigarette smoke as Armstrong, a flyboy with the composure of a Zen monk, improvises a landing on the lunar surface before offering the world his inscrutable “One small step for man” koan.But Shoot for the Moon isn’t all hero worship. Throughout the book, Donovan sprinkles in reminders that the public’s ambivalence about the quest to put astronauts on the moon continued long after Kennedy’s speech to Congress. Four years later, in 1965, Gallup found that only 39 percent of Americans thought the U.S. should do everything possible to beat the Soviet Union to the moon. Dwight Eisenhower had dismissed the need for a robust manned spaceflight program in the fifties, and he spent his post-presidency grumbling about the Apollo program, calling it “a mad effort to win a stunt race.” As Douglas Brinkley’s new history, American Moonshot: John F. Kennedy and the Great Space Race, makes clear, Eisenhower was far from alone.Brinkley, a Rice University professor, focuses on the birth of the moon shot, taking us back a century earlier to show its roots in fantasy. French novelist Jules Verne imagined, in 1865, that the first lunar mission would involve three American astronauts launched from Florida, and American rocket innovator Robert Goddard announced, in 1920, that he had received applications from nine men who wanted to ride one of his ships to the moon. But Brinkley also notes that making a serious attempt to reach the moon was far from inevitable.During the presidential campaign, Kennedy had hammered the Eisenhower administration for falling behind the Soviet Union in the space race, but in his early months in office, “Kennedy had adopted much the same cautious position toward space as his predecessor,” Brinkley writes. “Rather than focusing on headline-grabbing space launches, Kennedy was looking elsewhere for measurable accomplishment.”Even after issuing his moon shot challenge, the young president expressed doubts and offered inconsistent rationales for why it was worth it. In his famous 1962 speech at Rice University, Kennedy rallied a crowd of 40,000 by promising that “new hopes for knowledge and peace” would come from exploring the moon and beyond. Two months later, in a private conversation with NASA administrator James Webb, the president declared himself “not that interested in space” and said that “the only justification” for the Apollo program’s lavish expenditures was “to beat [the Soviets].” Then Kennedy seemed to waffle on the idea that the moon shot was a geopolitical competition. In September 1963 he proposed in a speech to the UN General Assembly that the U.S. and Soviet Union join together for a binational moon mission. When that proposal led nowhere, the president once more adopted a hawkish pose. On the afternoon of November 22, 1963, he was scheduled to discuss the Apollo program with the Dallas Citizens Council and tell them that “the United States of America has no intent of finishing second in space.” Brinkley argues that Kennedy’s death ensured that the moon shot would have enough funding to meet its before-the-decade-is-out deadline. Delaying or canceling the program became politically untenable. “From 1964 to 1969,” Brinkley writes, “whenever Congress considered gutting the Apollo programs, [President] Johnson evoked the martyred JFK with don’t-you-dare political mastery.”Hundreds of spectators—many of whom had camped out the night before—wait for the launch of Apollo 11 at Kennedy Space Center on July 16, 1969.NASAWhen the Apollo 11 crew landed safely back on Earth, the idea that the mission was only the start of the Space Age was widely held. In just over a decade, NASA had built three different generations of spaceships, blasted humans into orbit, sent astronauts outside their vehicles to “walk” in the void of space, and finally orchestrated the dizzying spectacle of the moon landing. The Wright brothers’ flight at Kitty Hawk had spurred decades of innovations that had forever changed the nature of war, travel, and trade on planet Earth. The space program seemed to offer the possibility of similarly radical results. “I thought at the time it was the beginning of something,” says the former Mission Control technician Poppy Northcutt during the close of Chasing the Moon, director Robert Stone’s gorgeous, often bittersweet documentary on the space race, which premieres on PBS’s American Experience in early July. “I thought it was the beginning of moving out to other planets.” Instead, in January 1970, NASA announced it would be shrinking its workforce by 50,000 over the next eighteen months. The agency’s budget, which reached a high of 4.4 percent of federal spending in 1966, dipped under 1 percent by 1975 and is now half a percent of the total. Over the past three decades, presidents George H. W. Bush, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama have all announced bold goals for human space exploration, with planned return trips to the moon, landings on asteroids, and voyages to Mars. None of these ambitions have come anywhere close to being realized. This past March, Vice President Mike Pence declared that NASA would send astronauts back to the moon by the end of 2024 “by any means necessary.” Don’t bet on it. Since the retirement of the space shuttle, in 2011, the United States hasn’t even had the capacity to launch humans into orbit, much less embark on a far more difficult and costly moon mission. The pronouncements of private space moguls have been no more reliable. SpaceX founder Elon Musk said in 2017 that he would land humans on Mars and lay the foundation for a colony there in 2024, but the spaceship that would actually take those first settlers there is still a far-off concept. SpaceX was slated to begin ferrying astronauts to the International Space Station in 2015 as part of a NASA contract. It has yet to launch its first manned mission. Virgin Galactic, founded by the British billionaire Richard Branson, began selling $200,000 tickets to space in 2004. In the fifteen years since, the company has flown a grand total of zero customers, and four people have died during testing. In the epilogue of Shoot for the Moon, Donovan asserts, “A new spirit of space exploration is in the air,” but if there is a new spirit, it’s mostly wishful thinking. The astrophysicist and television host Neil deGrasse Tyson offers a more believable assessment of the state of manned space exploration in his 2012 book Space Chronicles. “Unless we have a reprise of the geopolitical circumstances that dislodged $200 billion for space travel from taxpayers’ wallets in the 1960s,” Tyson writes, “I will remain unconvinced that we will ever send Homo sapiens anywhere beyond low Earth orbit.” So was Eisenhower right? Was Apollo a stunt? Did all those billions give us the world’s greatest photo op—Neil, Buzz, and an American flag on the surface of the moon—a propaganda victory over the Russians, and nothing else? As a kickoff to a new Age of Exploration, Apollo was certainly a dud. No human being has left low Earth orbit since 1972, much less set foot on another celestial body.Apollo defenders point to scientific and technological discoveries to justify the program. As Brinkley writes in American Moonshot, Apollo “teed up the technology-based economy the United States enjoys today,” leading to innovations in everything from computing to lightweight materials and meteorological forecasting. But these were all spin-off technologies that could have been developed for far less than $180 billion. The key engineering feats that powered the moon mission, the Saturn V rocket, in particular, did not spur the creation of bigger and better successors. In Space Chronicles, Tyson notes that “unlike . . . the first airplane or the first desktop computer—artifacts that make us all chuckle when we see them today—the first rocket to the Moon, the Saturn V, elicits awe, even reverence.” The last of those rockets, lying inert at a few museums, including Houston’s Johnson Space Center, stand like Gothic cathedrals. We stare and wonder how a culture ever marshaled the time, resources, and expertise to create something so intricate and grand.Still, Apollo has had psychic benefits that are hard to quantify. It is now our most potent national myth. The word “moon shot” has come to signify a go-for-broke effort to do the impossible. The phrase “If we can put a man on the moon, then—” starts many sentences asserting that seemingly intractable problems may not, in fact, be so intractable. And, unlike the Manhattan Project, a grand American project that resulted in the prospect of nuclear annihilation, Apollo 11 was the realization of an ancient and benign dream.After returning from space, a number of astronauts have talked about how the experience shifted their perspective on Earth, a phenomenon called the overview effect. Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell famously said, “You develop an instant global consciousness, a people orientation, an intense dissatisfaction with the state of the world, and a compulsion to do something about it.” Already a subscriber? Login or link your subscription.last_img read more

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MORE than 100 pupils from Allanson Street Primary

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first_imgMORE than 100 pupils from Allanson Street Primary School in St Helens helped Saints stars make their mark on the town centre.The youngsters staged an ‘impromptu’ flash mob event to help unveil a giant pavement graphic – in the shape of the Club’s iconic red vee logo – in Church Square.With the Club’s anthem playing, the pupils echoed the famous lyrics by ‘marching in’ to the square and performing a choreographed, handclapping routine for hundreds of town centre shoppers.Saints stars including Paul Wellens, Jamie Foster, Gary Wheeler, Ade Gardner, Jonny Lomax and Paul Clough were among those watching – before setting off on a series of visits to town centre shops.The event was one of the highlights of the ‘Love Saints – Love St Helens’campaign – which aims to breathe new life into the town centre.Shops throughout the town centre are already carrying campaign-themed posters and decorations, while specially designed pedestrian signs and smaller floor graphics are visible in many town centre streets.Cabinet Member for Urban Regeneration and Housing, Councillor Andy Bowden, said: “It was the high point of a unique, fun campaign that’s got a really serious message – about supporting our hard-pressed town centre retailers.“The arrival of St. Helens R.F.C.’s new Langtree Park in the commercial heart of the town provided the springboard for this initiative and we’re delighted that our newest, superstar neighbours are doing all they can to help the local economy.”Local retailers visited by the players included Tyrers, Greenhalghs, HCUK, St.Mary’s Market, B&M Bargains, Le Frog Bistro, Argos, Marks and Spencer, HMV, BHS, Thorntons, Jones & Hoffman, The Mens Room, Millets, Wilkinsons, OD’s, Fleurs Florist and Colours Restaurant.last_img read more

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THERE is no doubt that the performance against Hul

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first_imgTHERE is no doubt that the performance against Hull KR last Friday was nowhere near good enough from a club of the stature of St.Helens.There has been a lot of soul searching since the defeat and we fully understand the anger and frustrations of our supporters who rightfully expect and deserve better given the strength of our squad.Nathan Brown, the coaching staff and the players are more than capable of producing a strong end to the 2013 Super League campaign. There has never been a more important time for all at and connected with the Club, including our fans, to pull together. We have the quality of coaching staff and players to compete with and beat the best teams in Super League and to make an impact in the season-end play offs. It is still there to be done.We have recently signed two top quality and young NRL players in Luke Walsh and Mose Masoe at a time when the differential in salary cap with Super League was producing a seemingly one way exodus. Nathan Brown and his coaching reputation was critical to this success as was the standing and reputation of the St.Helens Club. This can only augur well.Although our current poor set of results are justifiably uppermost in all our minds presently, it must not be ignored that we are building a new, talented and young squad after a couple of seasons of transition and in a season when a number of senior players are set to retire or leave the Club. We have handed eight debuts to young players this season and all but Alex Walmsley have come from our youth system. There is no doubt that we are building a strong squad for the future and in the right manner, and we must not lose sight of that.That said, we fully expect the current first team squad to have a strong end to the season and we have full confidence in them fulfilling their collective talent, which is as good as any in the Super League.As per my comments no more than a fortnight ago, there is no room left for sub-par performances either from the team or from individual players. We may well have had some bad luck this season but we must also face up to the fact that some of our performances have been well below rightful expectations. The rest of the season gives us the opportunity to correct that.We will work tirelessly to reach the highest standards which we always seek to set.It is only together that we are stronger and there is no doubt that that the continued support of our loyal fans is key to that togetherness.Eamonn McManus, Chairman, St.Helens R.F.C.last_img read more

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Adam Swift grabbed a hattrick as Saints beat the

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first_imgAdam Swift grabbed a hat-trick as Saints beat the Vikings 36-6“I am pleased with the team,” he said. “I know Widnes have been struggling but they have been competitive as we saw that last week. We could have been excused tonight for not being as dominant as we were but we didn’t want to go down that path.“Our defence was fantastic, we scored some good tries and came close at other times as well. It’s all credit to the players, they had a choice tonight and they decided to rip in and we got the result we deserved.”He continued: “We had to have a bit of a reshuffle due to injury but I thought the boys did a fantastic job. Adam Swift was fantastic; he was our best tonight and it was great to give him a game.“He had couple of runs at Sheffield before we had a week off. I told him he could have a week off too but he wanted to play another game.“When blokes make those decisions it is rewarding as a coach to put them in the first team and watch them play so well.”last_img read more

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FREE FOOD Teachers eat for free Tuesday at Red Robin

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first_img The offer is valid dine-in only for all teachers, educational professionals and administrators.A teacher or school identification is required.There is a Red Robin location in Wilmington. Teachers are the best That’s why we’re giving you a FREE Tavern Double Burger & Bottomless Fries. Stop in June 5 with your faculty ID to cash in on this delicious gift. https://t.co/q6E67CmaIK pic.twitter.com/vIT7kry5OJ— Red Robin (@redrobinburgers) May 31, 2018Related Article: 4 Texas prison guards fired, 2 resign for #FeelingCute posts (Photo: Red Robin/Twitter) Educators, it’s your time to eat free at Red Robin!The restaurant is celebrating the end of the school year on June 5 by offering teachers, counselors, bus drivers and school administrators a free Tavern Double Burger and bottomless steak fries.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Big Macs to benefit Battleship this Memorial Day weekend

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first_imgWILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — You can grab a burger at America’s favorite fast food chain this weekend to help a local landmark raise money.Head to any McDonald’s in the Cape Fear region through Monday for “Big Macs for the Battleship” to raise money for the Battleship North Carolina.- Advertisement – McDonald’s will donate 50 cents from every Big Sac sold to the ship’s restoration fund.Participating locations include McDonald’s in Wilmington, Burgaw, Carolina Beach, Elizabethtown, Hampstead, Leland, Lumberton, Rocky Point, Shallotte, Sneads Ferry, Southport, St. Pauls, Sunset Beach, Supply, Surf City and Whiteville.last_img

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Minister for Gozo funds 31 beneficiaries

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first_imgMGOZ – Terry CamilleriMGOZ – Terry Camilleri The Minister for Gozo Justyne Caruana met with representatives from 31 different organisations, all of which will enjoy financial aid after successfully applying for grants from the Minister.During 2019, voluntary organisations have already received a total of €160,000 worth of grants. The Minister for Gozo mentioned how this year, she will be increasing the financial aid supplied to the voluntary sector.A second scheme will also be launched, relating to the ‘Promotion of Sports, Initiatives, and Facilities’.List of beneficiaries:Non-Government Organisations Scheme 2019Assoċjazzjoni Kura, Dar Ġuzeppa Debono, Don Bosco Oratory, Friends of the Crib Gozo-Malta 1985 – Nadur Section, Saint Gregory’s Band Club – Kerċem, Gozo Association for the Deaf, Malta Cadets Corps, Philharmonic Society Santa Marija, Philharmonic Leone, The Scout Association of MaltaPromotion of Sports, Initiatives and Facilities 2019Għajnsielem Redcoats, Gozo Cycling Club, Gozo Half Marathon, Munxar Falcons FC, Xewkija Tigers FCCulture Fund Scheme 2019 – 1st issueOn Bosco Oratory Gozo, D Capitals Band, Carmelino Refalo, Għaqda Mużikali Viżitazzjoni Għarb, Għarb Local Council, Ite ad Joseph – Qala Band Club, Michel Angelo Muscat, Qala Local Council, Sannat Local Council, Philharmonic Society La Stella, Philharmonic Society Mnarja – Nadur, Philharmonic Society Santa Marija – Żebbuġ, Xagħra United Football Club SharePrint WhatsAppcenter_img <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a>last_img read more

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Microsoft unveils Office 2013

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first_imgAdvertisement “This is the most ambitious release of Office we’ve ever done,” CEO Steve Ballmer announced.“The new version of Office is designed to be extraordinarily flexible,” Ballmer said. “Users will be able to run it on touch-screen tablets and PCs. They will be able to interact with it using their fingers, styluses, keyboards or mice. And they can purchase it as packaged software or subscribe to it as a service.”Microsoft has only overhauled two of the applications – the OneNote note-taking program and the Lync collaboration software – so that they will work under the Metro interface. All the other applications can be used only in Windows’ traditional desktop interface. – Advertisement – But the company has added features to all of the Office applications. Word, for example, will get a new “reading” mode that mimics an e-reader. Users will be able to turn pages and add notes to documents much like they would using Amazon’s Kindle app.Excel’s upgrade will allow users to see a quick preview of charts and tables without having to go through the steps of creating each one first.The entire suite of Office software is designed to embrace some of the latest technology trends. By default, the new Office will save users’ documents and settings on Microsoft’s servers. That will allow users to access all their documents and settings regardless of what Office compatible device they are using, from a Windows PC to a Windows phone.Social networking also will be highlighted. Users will be able to share documents on Facebook or LinkedIn and instantly connect with contacts on Skype while within the Outlook email program. And Microsoft is turning its SharePoint service into something of its own social network, allowing users to post messages, comment on others’ messages and share links or videos.“The new version of Office includes plenty of new and promising features,” said Mike Silver, an analyst at Gartner, a technology research firm. But he added that it may struggle to catch on.Microsoft is planning to end its support for Windows XP, the still widely used 10-year-old version of the operating system, in less than two years, noted Silver. Organizations that are still running XP are largely focused on moving their computers and users off of it, rather than worrying about upgrading to the latest version of Office, he said.Spending time to evaluate the new version of the software suite “is time that a lot of organizations just don’t have,” said Silver. Office’s new features “may encourage them to upgrade, but it may not be right away,” he added.Microsoft declined to say when the new Office will be available or how much it will cost.The new Office will come in multiple versions and will go by multiple brand names. For example, the online version will maintain its “Office 365” moniker, while the retail version will go by Office 2013. The version of Office that will run on computers using chips designed by ARM won’t include the Outlook email program that’s included in other versions of the software. But at the news conference Monday, company representatives repeatedly referred to the software suits simply as “Office.”Office has become Microsoft’s main source of cash, providing more than 30 percent of its sales and more than half of its revenue in its current fiscal year. But the new version of the suite comes as Microsoft’s products are beset by heightened competition.The new version of Office may give upcoming Windows 8-based tablets a way to distinguish themselves in a market currently dominated by Apple’s iPad. Source: newsobserver.comlast_img read more

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