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Tanya Saracho’s Mala Hierba Opens Off-Broadway

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first_img Mala Hierba will run through August 10 as part of Second Stage’s twelfth annual Uptown Series. Mala Hierba celebrates its off-Broadway opening on July 28. The New York premiere stars Marta Milans, Roberta Colindrez, Sandra Marquez and Ana Nogueira. Jerry Ruiz directs the production at the McGinn/Cazale Theatre. Written by Tanya Saracho, the play follows Liliana (Milans), a seemingly impeccable trophy wife of a border magnate living in Texas. But beneath her polished exterior lies a fierce determination to survive at any cost. When her true desires break the surface, she is forced to decide between obligation and the price of freedom.center_img View Commentslast_img

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Best Strength Building Exercises for Every Sport

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first_imgAdventure sports like running, hiking, and biking demand such high levels of endurance that athletes tend to forget about training for strength building exercises. “Most riders think they have to put in more time on the bike to get faster, but incorporating strength training will deliver greater results,” says pro mountain bike trainer James Wilson. Wilson, who trains downhill pros, singlespeed champions, and back of the packers alike, developed the MTB Strength Training System, a guide for bikers that puts an emphasis on full-body strength building exercises. “Strength equals technical ability on a bike, pure and simple,” Wilson says.Most pro coaches from all endurance sports now incorporate strength training in their athletes’ routines. We’ve found some of the best strength training exercises geared to specific adventure athletes. Use the plan below to get stronger for your favorite sport, or combine the exercises for a full body shake down.THE RUNNERSingle-leg squats: Bend your right knee slightly and raise your left foot off the ground in front of you so you’re standing only on your right leg. Bend your leg, trying to keep your back straight and left foot in front of you, so you drop into a squat. Go as low as you can, and return to a standing position. Repeat 10 times with each leg. Works: Quads and glutes“Some runners overlook strength training,” says running coach Jennifer Gill. “But strength training prevents injuries by providing running economy and keeping your form true when you get tired.”Side Plank: From a push up position, pull your right hand off the ground while twisting your torso, and extend your right arm perpendicular to your body. Your entire body should be supported by your left arm and left leg. Keep your torso straight. Hold for 10 seconds and repeat on the other side. Works: abs, lower back, shoulders THE BIKERBulgarian Squats: Rest the top of your foot on a bench behind you, your other foot stretched in front of you. Drop down so your back knee touches the ground, then explode back up. That’s one rep. Do ten on each side and repeat. Works: Quads, calves, and hips Split Squats: Holding light dumbbells in each hand, stand with your feet split wide, one in front, one in back. Bend your front knee, lowering your body toward the ground, keeping your spine straight, and the heel of your front foot planted on the ground. When your back knee touches the ground, rise up. That’s one rep. Do 20 reps, then switch your front foot and do 20 more. Works: Quads, glutes, coreTHE PADDLERBoat Pose: Sit on the floor holding a rock or weight away from your chest. Lean back and raise your legs so your entire body is balanced on your sitting bones (your body should look like the bottom of a boat). Holding this pose alone should activate your core. Next, rotate the weight to your right side, trying to touch it to the ground. Then rotate left. That’s one rep. Do 15, rest, and do 15 more. Works: Core and shoulders Side Press: Standing straight, with a dumbbell in each hand resting at your shoulders, bend your upper body to the left while pushing your right hip out. At the same time, press the right dumbbell toward the ceiling. Lower and return to an erect position. That’s one rep. Do ten on each side, rest, and do ten more.Works: Core and shoulders THE CLIMBERAngled Pole Climb: On a playground, sit at the base of an angled swingset pole. Wrap your ankles around the base of the pole and grip the pole with your hands at eye level. Pull yourself to the top, then lower back down. Do 5 repeats. Works: Core and shoulders, back, handsSwingset Push Ups: On the same playground, get in a push-up position with your toes resting on the seat of a swing. Do a push up, then pull your knees into your chest, hold, then extend them again. That’s one rep. Do 10 reps, rest, then do 10 more. Works: Chest, core, shoulders, hipsELEMENTARY SCHOOL WORKOUTWant to see serious gains in your endurance and strength and have fun in the process? Work out like an eight-year-old. Some of the classic gym-class exercises you dreaded as a kid employ key principles of functional fitness.“The older you are, the better your school PE was,” says Dan MacDougald, owner of Crossfit Atlanta. Crossfit training uses a variety of basic movements, many of which are familiar to athletes from their school days. “There’s a lot of worth to the exercises we used to do in PE. Physical education has been dumbed down in recent years, but at one time, kids got a good workout.”Try these three “old school” exercises for a full body shakedown.Rope ClimbThe dreaded rope climb engages all of the workhorse muscles in your upper body, and builds muscle endurance as well as strength, which is key in succeeding at adventure sports like climbing, paddling, and mountain biking. Try five rope repeats, and gradually rely less on your legs to move up the rope. Can’t find a gym rope? Climb a tree instead.Jumping Rope10 minutes of jumping rope will burn as many calories as jogging for 10 minutes at eight-minutes-per-mile pace. For a simple workout, try jump intervals. Jump as many times as you can in 30 seconds, then rest for 30. Next, jump swinging the rope backwards for 30 seconds, and rest for 30. Do 10 minutes of intervals and build from there.Shuttle RunThis gym-class staple builds speed, agility, and endurance. Place two blocks (in school we used erasers) or rocks 30 feet from your starting point. Sprint from the starting line to the first block, pick it up and sprint back to the line, set the block down and sprint back to the second block, picking it up and sprinting back to the start. Time yourself. In 1985, an eight-year-old had to finish the run in 11.1 seconds to be considered for the Presidential Fitness Award.last_img read more

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Legends of Ohiopyle

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first_imgNestled among the rugged Laurel Highlands of Pennsylvania lies an old logging town with an international renown that far outweighs its scant population of 59.That town is Ohiopyle, a sleepy little place with a few old buildings and one main road that runs through town uninterrupted by stop sign or traffic light. But what it lacks in appearances it makes up for in one thing. Whitewater.Picture this: a one-mile class III “Loop” on the Lower Youghiogheny (Yough) in your front yard, the natural bend of the river making a shuttle unnecessary; a half-hour-drive to the put-in of the class IV+ Upper Yough; another 45-minute drive to any of the Yough’s steep class V tributaries along with countless other runs in the area like Big Sandy and the Cheat River Canyon; and, of course, a killer Thursday night yoga class by Yogi Wade paired with brews, foods, and tunes at the local Falls City Pub. That sleepy little town doesn’t seem so drowsy anymore, right?It’s a diamond in the rough no doubt, yet one whose reputation for world-class whitewater, and whitewater paddlers, is incomparable. Rewind 30-some years to the late ‘70s and ‘80s, to an era that saw the rebirthing of whitewater paddling and a boom in the industry right on the waters of the Yough. Whether raft guide, entrepreneur, or downright gutsy kayaker, you can’t tell the history of paddling in the ‘Pyle without mentioning the following five individuals.ERIC MARTINOwner •Wilderness VoyageursEric Martin never anticipated taking over the family rafting business. His father, Lance Martin, had started one of the first rafting companies in Ohiopyle, Wilderness Voyageurs, with his wife in 1964. Although Martin worked for his parents during the season, in his eyes, that job was merely a means to an end.“I worked as a raft guide to earn money to go kayaking somewhere else,” Martin says. “I was on the water twice a day, every day, year-round.”Inspired by other world-class kayakers like Jon Lugbill and Kent Ford who also frequented the Yough, Martin took his passion for paddling to a competitive level. In 1983, he began slalom racing and would continue to do so for over a decade, placing second in the junior world championships and making it all the way to the team trials for the Olympic games in 1996.“There were no boat companies sponsoring athletes in the ‘70s and ‘80s,” Martin recalls, “but when you’re talking and paddling with U.S. team members who are traveling around the world going kayaking, that seems like a pretty good idea at 14 years old.”But, as life would have it, the year 1991 saw a turn of events that sent Martin from his competitive tour around the world back to his hometown to take over Wilderness Voyageurs. Martin has kept the business going strong and the company is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, making it the oldest rafting outfitter in the East. Although Martin no longer has the flexibility to get out on the water “twice a day, every day, year round,” the outfitter is conveniently located across the train tracks from the Lower Yough take-out.“We’re in the crucible of whitewater in this country,” Martin says. “Whether it’s a flatwater workout or ramping it up and running class Vs, it’s all available. That’s a lot of quality of life right there.”KARA WELDCo-owner •Immersion ResearchAlthough Kara Weld grew up on the banks of the Yough, she was born and raised not in Ohiopyle but in Confluence, just a short 30-minute drive over the mountain. Her father was an avid outdoorsman, and together, the two learned to kayak.“We were the biggest geeks on the river,” Weld remembers. “I’m pretty sure I had a big football helmet on.”As Weld grew older, so too did her love of kayaking. Although Ohiopyle had a crew of older guys who paddled daily, Weld was just a kid still. More than that, Weld was a girl, and women paddlers in the ‘80s were far and few between. When a new kayaking school opened in town and the owner started a kid’s group, Weld immediately signed up. In less than a year, she was racing at her first slalom event.From the Lower Yough to the Ocoee River, Weld was on the water nearly every weekend, either training or competing. In 1984, Weld earned a spot on the U.S. junior team, which launched her kayaking career. Suddenly she was no longer dinking around on the Middle Yough with her dad and her beater gear; she was paddling some of the most difficult runs in the world.“I think I swam in every country I visited,” Weld says. “I was very timid in harder whitewater.”Keep in mind that Weld was just a teenager at the time. Eventually, she would move up the ranks, becoming a three-time U.S. National Women’s Champion who competed on the U.S. team for 20 years. In 1995 she married her husband John and two years later, made the decision to quit the competition scene. That same year, Weld returned to her hometown of Confluence to embark on a new adventure.“My husband said, ‘We should make kayaking gear.’ I told him, ‘You’re insane.’”Thus Immersion Research (IR) was born, a kayaking gear manufacturer based out of Confluence that made its splash onto the marketplace by making rash guards and surf trunks, the labor taking place in the Weld family basement. Now, IR produces everything from base layers to dry suits, a staple brand among Ohiopyle’s many raft guides and paddlers.JESS WHITTEMOREChief engineer • Immersion Research“It was like a renaissance of kayaking.”That’s how Jess Whittemore describes the whitewater scene in Ohiopyle during the late ‘70s and early ‘80s, a time of change and innovation, when awkwardly long composite boats were the industry standard and the slickest, sickest moves entailed twirling your paddle around your neck. For Whittemore, who moved to the area from Albright, W.Va., to raft guide for another outfitter in town, the ‘80s in particular brought about one of the greatest changes of all, a development he was largely responsible for: the introduction of three-dimensional boating.“I discovered pillow squirting and blasting holes and it really revolutionized the sport,” Whittemore says. “It eventually turned into present-day play boating and it’s fantastic what they’re doing now, things I never dreamed of.”With fellow paddler and friend Jon Lugbill, Whittemore continued to challenge himself to invent different moves. As he continued to push, he began to tap into the currents that not only flow on the water’s surface but also beneath and around the features. In opening up this entirely unexplored realm of possibilities, Whittemore realized that the boat styles at that time could not perform the moves he knew were possible.“I designed my first kayak right there in the garage,” Whittemore says. “I called it the Millennium Falcon. It was the first squirt boat really, although I didn’t know it then.”Whittemore was one of a few other paddlers in town who were beginning to design their own boats, the most prominent of those being Jim Snyder who began specifically crafting squirt boats. Whittemore continued to build boats throughout his paddling career, working in the shop when he wasn’t on the water.“I was the quintessential kayak bum,” he says. “I was so busy barely making money by making boats that my full and complete attention was really just to be a great kayaker.”Whittemore eventually took his creative outlet to Immersion Research where he continues to work as the chief engineer. He designs everything from dry tops to spray skirts, and although his paddling heyday has simmered down a bit, he remains active in the paddling community by fighting for recreational boating dam releases in the area.PHIL COLEMANRaft guide • Wilderness VoyageursAlthough the commercial rafting scene in Ohiopyle mostly centers on running the Yough and the nearby Cheat River Canyon, a select few of the area’s boaters in the late 1970s were hungry for more. Phil Coleman was at the forefront of that group, a raft guide by day and kayaker by night.“There were a lot of egos flying around back then,” Coleman says. “The highest concentration of kayakers pushing the envelope in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s were located in Ohiopyle. The sport was going through a true revolution.”Like most paddlers in town, Coleman was on the water nearly every day and had been raft guiding for the local outfitters since high school. He joined names like Dean Tomko, Roger Zbel, and the Snyder brothers on the water, and soon Coleman was part of an elite paddling posse that was running some of the steepest creeks around. In 1978, Coleman, accompanied by Jim Snyder and Mike Fentress, set a record in the paddling community, knocking off a first descent of the infamous Quarry Run.“There were lots of smash ups and pins and broken boats and near close calls, but that was definitely one of my greater accomplishments at the time,” Coleman says, failing to mention that he was the near close call. Now, over 30 years since that record-setting first descent, Coleman is still an active boater and member of the paddling community.“Maybe something’s wrong with me, but I love it. It’s just plain fun,” he says.Coleman splits his time between Albright, W.Va., Ohiopyle, Penn., and Costa Rica so that he can be on or around the water year-round. In Costa Rica, he started his own eco-tourism adventure outfitter called RainForest World and regularly guides tourists down everything from class IV+ whitewater to scenic float trips.TOM LOVEOwner • Airtight InflatablesIf you don’t know who Tom Love is, you’ve likely seen boaters taking his brainchild down rivers around the world, or maybe you even own one yourself. The shredder, an inflatable river craft, was one of those inventions that came out of that whitewater renaissance of the ‘80s. Prior to crafting the shredder, Love had not only been an avid paddler and raft guide, but also a boat repairman.“For awhile, every company that built boats had me as their warranty center,” Love says. “Finally I said, ‘Well gee whiz, these people are building screwed-up boats. I can screw up boats just as easy as they can.’”In 1978, Love quit the business of repairing other companies’ boats to focus his energy on crafting his own line of inflatable rafts. Already an iconic figure in the rafting industry around Ohiopyle, Love was easily able to strike deals with local outfitters and made just enough money to continue experimenting with boat designs while supporting himself. The idea for the shredder came about in the mid-1980s when a friend of Love came to him with a request. He needed a boat that was faster than traditional rafts so he could get ahead of commercial trips and shoot video, the early predecessor of a video boater.“If not for huge video cameras, these shredders would have never been built,” Love says.That first prototype looks much like the present-day shredder, and it wasn’t long before Love abandoned producing traditional oval rafts to exclusively making shredders.“For a while I was only making demos, but I kept selling the sons-o’-bitches,” he says, a testament to the cutting-edge-inflatable’s increasing popularity. Since then, other raft manufacturing companies have tried their hand at producing similar crafts; however, Love’s base in Ohiopyle and his connections in the region ensure that the shredder craze will live on.last_img read more

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Argentina and Chile Reaffirm Joint Security and Defense Cooperation Agreement

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first_imgBy Francisco Pereira/Diálogo December 01, 2016 Chilean Foreign Minister Heraldo Muñoz Valenzuela, Argentine Foreign Minister Susana Malcorra, Chilean Defense Minister José Antonio Gómez Urrutia, and Argentine Defense Minister Julio César Martinez attended the Mechanism 2+2 meeting, a traditional gathering between the two countries, in the Green Room of the San Martín Palace in Buenos Aires, Argentina on November 4th. Participants focused on several topics of mutual interest, such as their participation in the South American Defense Council (CDS, per its Spanish acronym), an organ of the Union of South American Nations, and on the Conference of Defense Ministers of the Americas (CMDA, per its Spanish acronym). South American Defense Council “Strengthening the South American Defense Council allows for transparency and for working on various issues of relevance to the region,” said Minister Gómez in reference to Chile’s interest in the CDS. “Therefore, I think we need to play a more prominent role in this matter.” The CDS was created in 2008 and comprises South America’s 12 countries. The goal is to make South America a peaceful region, create conditions for political stability and socio-economic development, and build a South American defense identity. It also aims to foster consensus to contribute to strengthening cooperation around the continent. Conference of Defense Ministers of the Americas During the discussion regarding the results of the October CMDA meeting in Trinidad and Tobago, Minister Gómez explained that the subject of operations tied to natural disasters was one of the topics discussed, including the intense seismic activity that stroke Chile at the time, injuring people and damaging property throughout the country. On that occasion, a working group was established with representatives from both South American countries – Chile being the main driver of this initiative – because “we have experience with different natural disasters, and, therefore, we can work together on this and make a valuable contribution,” said Minister Gómez. Security and defense cooperation and other topics Marcos Robledo, Chile’s undersecretary of Defense, spoke of his country’s participation in the United Nation’s Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic and highlighted the relationship Chile has with Argentina. “The relationship that we have been reaffirming with Argentina by way of defense is quite interesting; this is a permanent and ongoing effort on matters that are of benefit to the citizenry.” Regarding the area of bilateral security and defense cooperation, the representatives showed a willingness to continue and even expand a series of projects that both countries are developing jointly among their navies, armies, and air forces. Participants also discussed cooperation in other mutual areas, such as science, military equipment technology and development, the Antarctic, gender and military issues, as well as risk management, among others. A topic of much discussion was the inclusion of UN Resolution 1325, which requires women’s rights to be respected in order to support their involvement in post-conflict peace negotiations. Both countries pledged to present a plan to incorporate the resolution at the ministers’ meeting to be held in Buenos Aires on December 15th-16th. The initial plan calls for the use of the Combined Peace Force “Southern Cross” as the baseline for the incorporation of the resolution. Colombia’s peace process was also discussed, with both chancellors pledging to remain involved as observers in the United Nations Special Political Mission in the Republic of Colombia. “The forum is of great relevance because we have an extensive agenda with Chile on very important projects and operations in the area of defense, since we share such a long border,” said Argentine Minister Martinez. “All the work that we are doing in the mutual area of natural disasters and peacekeeping operations around the world is essential,” he added. Cooperation between Argentina and Chile dates back a long time, and it is undoubtedly an example of diplomatic success between two partner nations that have resolved past conflicts and territorial disputes along their extensive borders. Since the 2009 signing of the Maipú Treaty, these meetings have become a tradition between these two neighbors. The treaty aims to deepen the level of bilateral cooperation in different areas, and these binational meetings of ministers are essential for achieving those goals. Seven meetings have been held in this format. In 2015, during the 7th Bi-national Meeting of Ministers in Santiago, defense authorities from both nations signed a joint declaration on their 2015 Bilateral Action Plan, which includes 12 commitments that will allow them to focus their efforts in the defense sector.last_img read more

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Court rules against Barry U.

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first_img June 1, 2002 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular News Court rules against Barry U. 111 graduates denied chance to become Florida lawyers Court rules against Barry U. Associate Editor Refusing to second-guess the ABA or bend the Rules Relating to Admissions to the Bar, the Florida Supreme Court denied Barry University School of Law’s petition to release exam results impounded during a protracted ABA accreditation process.The May 16 ruling dealt a devastating blow to 111 Barry law students who graduated in January, June, and July 2000 and January 2001 — more than 12 months earlier than the ABA’s February 4, 2002, decision to grant Barry provisional accreditation, and therefore in violation of Rule 2-11.1.Barry law school Dean Stanley Talcott said he is working with ABA officials to see what help, if any, the school can offer graduates caught in legal career limbo with a legal education but no way to practice law in Florida.“I’m disappointed, indescribably so, dejected, and all of the other adjectives. And surprised, quite frankly, given the Supreme Court had accommodated the situation previously during the process,” said Scott Blaue, who graduated third in his class, served as editor-in-chief of law review, and took the bar exam in July 2000 only to have the results impounded forever.The 35-year-old husband and father of three works as a law clerk while he dreams of being a licensed lawyer some day. He is also a plaintiff in a federal lawsuit against the ABA, challenging the fairness of the accreditation process.The pending lawsuit, he said wryly, “was certainly not mooted by this decision.”In Barry’s petition, Holland & Knight lawyers former Justice Stephen H. Grimes and Lucinda A. Hofmann noted the human price with budding legal careers hanging in the balance:“If this court does not grant the requested relief, 111 graduates of a currently accredited law school will not be permitted to practice in Florida. At best, these graduates can sit for the bar examination in a state that does not require graduation from an ABA accredited law school, practice there for 10 years, and then, if still desirous of practicing in Florida, seek admission under Rule 2-11.2.”But the court showed little sympathy for affected Barry graduates, stressing the rule is the rule, and the rule is clear.“We note that all students who enrolled at Barry University while it was unaccredited were on notice of the risk in attending an unaccredited law school when they began their studies at Barry University. Furthermore, each of our prior orders allowing Barry University students to sit for the bar exam was contingent on the law school obtaining provisional accreditation within 12 months of these students’ graduations,” said the unanimous court decision in Case No. SC02-740 (with Justice R. Fred Lewis recused).The court held firm to enforcing Rule 2-11.1, which requires that graduation occur within 12 months of accreditation. Barry had argued that the fairest date to start that clock ticking is the fall of 2000, when Barry received a favorable site visit that became the later basis for ABA accreditation. But the Florida Board of Bar Examiners countered that the 12-month rule is set by the actual February 2002 ABA accreditation decision and adhering to that rule is important in maintaining a consistent and fair process.In its petition, Barry insisted it was not asking for a waiver of the rules.But the high court disagreed.“A waiver is essentially what Barry University is asking this court to provide by allowing those students who graduated more than 12 months before the time that actual accreditation was granted to be considered for admission to The Florida Bar. Further, although Barry University claims that it is not asking this court to ‘second-guess the ABA or to determine that it erred,’ in fact by its request, Barry University would have this court go behind the ABA’s multitiered process of decision making and reach a determination that the ABA erred by not granting provisional accreditation in February 2001. Barry University’s request would have this court return to its pre- Hale [ Florida Board of Bar Examiners In re Hale, 433 So. 2d 969, 971 (Fla. 1983)] days where the court granted and denied waivers on a case-by-case basis.”As director of institutional advancement at Barry law school, it was Eric DuBois’s job to deliver a copy of the order to Dean Talcott and other school officials as soon as the May 16 opinion was released.“Their reaction was devastation,” said DuBois, who took the news personally as a June 2000 Barry law graduate with $100,000 racked up in student loans.“The hardest part as an alum is here I sat next to a lot of the students who are OK to take the bar exam, and studied with them for exams. The only difference was they took one class, or turned in a paper, after I did. And they can practice law and I can’t,” DuBois said.“It kind of makes me wonder if I want to join the Bar knowing that as a graduate of this school, we weren’t wanted. If you want us, want us. I did everything I thought I was supposed to do. I applied for the bar exam, I did my education in four years. And I would put the education I received up against any other school in the state.”Dean Talcott said he feels graduates’ pain and wants to see what he can do to help.“An awful lot right now is restricted to efforts to find out what options are available that are within the ability of the school to do without bringing jeopardy to any other parts of the school’s mission,” Talcott said.While Barry’s lawyers have asked the Supreme Court for a rehearing, Talcott said he is carefully reviewing with ABA officials options for assisting affected graduates that would be in full accordance with standards and sound education principles, including:• Allow graduates to come back to Barry law school and they won’t be charged as much for tuition.• Fast-track graduates with an advance standing to recover degrees by taking upper-level courses.“In a way, that could be a win-win situation for us,” Talcott said, explaining qualified graduates, many with experience working as law clerks, could serve as valuable mentors to first-year law students and ratchet up scholarly discussions in classes.“But obviously, it is more time and effort for people who have already gone through the program,” he added.Talcott said he was disappointed by the court’s ruling, but not surprised.“I have practiced law for 30 years, and if I’ve learned nothing else, it is in the nature of every case that it can be decided several ways, and you will not always get the outcome you would hope for. Surprise is never a term that applies,” Talcott said.“But that sad feeling for the people affected, no matter how long you practice, that never goes away.”last_img read more

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‘For the Children’ Web page

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first_img Linking lawyers with service organizations ‘For the Children’ Web page When Bar President Miles McGrane asked Florida’s lawyers to “please rise to the challenge” in his mission to help children, he has some very specific ideas in mind to link attorneys to where they are needed most.That new vehicle is the “For the Children” Web page on The Florida Bar Web site at www.flabar.org.“Everyone knows Florida lawyers have no rivals in pro bono participation. Yet I am asking our members to re-double their efforts,” McGrane said.“As I traveled the state urging this increased effort, I heard from some of our members that they didn’t know how to get started or that they didn’t know who needed their services.“Yet we know there are many not-for-profit organizations serving children that need legal assistance.”Through the Web page, McGrane said, nonprofit organizations needing legal services will be able to register their needs, and lawyers will be able to register their willingness to serve. Florida Legal Services and the Florida Pro Bono Coordinators Association will match the volunteer lawyers to the nonprofit groups.“Through this vehicle, we will be able to match organizations that serve children with members of the Bar who are willing to provide either free legal service or possibly serve on the board itself,” McGrane said. “I am happy to say the For the Children Web page is now up and running.“I hope all of you, no matter what type of legal work you do, will join in this effort. From past experience, I know you will.”In addition, McGrane has pledged to work on implementing recommendations of the Bar’s Commission on the Legal Needs of Children, created by former Bar President Edith Osman and chaired for three years by 11th Circuit Judge Sandy Karlan. The final report was completed in June 2002 and is available on the Bar’s Web site.McGrane said he and Bar President-elect Kelly Overstreet Johnson met with the Bar’s committee leadership and asked the chair of each rules committee to “ensure its rules of procedure are consistent with the commission’s recommendations and that they ensure children involved in all court proceedings have the right to appear in court and be heard.”Additionally, McGrane and Johnson brought their message to a meeting of the Counsel of Sections.They urged the substantive law sections of the Bar to lend their political influence in support of all those portions of the commission’s report that have not yet become Florida law.As was suggested by the Commission on the Legal Needs of Children, sections will develop continuing legal education programs, McGrane said.Under the leadership of former Bar President Terry Russell, a committee has been formed to study the implementation of the commission’s many recommendations. Former ABA President Martha Barnett, Board of Governor member Sharon Langer, and Richard Milstein, chair of the Council of Sections, have agreed to serve on the oversight committee to make sure reviews proceed on schedule. ‘For the Children’ Web pagecenter_img July 15, 2003 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Briefs

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first_img Briefs FLORIDA BAR PRESIDENT Kelly Overstreet Johnson, from the left, Sen. Rod Smith, D-Gainesville, and Rep. Dorothy Hukill, R-New Smyrna Beach, enjoy a few minutes together recently at a Bar sponsored legislative reception in Tallahassee. Both Smith and Hukill are members of the Bar. THE U.S. DISTRICT COURT for the Southern District of Florida recently presented law firms with certificates of appreciation for taking numerous pro bono cases from the Court’s Volunteer Lawyers’ Project. The awards were given during the VLP’s CLE seminar at the court, “Pro Bono Practice: Practicing Law for Love and Money.” The seminar was co-sponsored by the Federal Bar Association’s chapters for West Palm Beach, Broward, and South Florida. Pictured from the left are U.S. District Court Judge Aldaberto Jordan, Sherylle A.O. Gordon (Clarke Silverglate Campbell Williams & Montgomery), Anthony Sanchez (Anthony F. Sanchez P.A.), Robert Hudson (Carlton Fields), Tracy Nichols (Holland & Knight), Vance Salter (Hunton & Williams), Ed Davis (Akerman Senterfitt), Frank Zacherl (Shutts & Bowen), and U.S. Magistrate Judge Patrick White. THE PAUL C. PERKINS BAR ASSOCIATION’S judicial reception recently honored the eight African American members of the Central Florida judiciary. The PCP Bar — named in honor of the late Paul C. Perkins, one of the first African American attorneys in the Orlando area – is a chapter of the National Bar Association and consists of a group of African American attorneys who are dedicated to serving the Central Florida community. Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell attorneys LaShawnda Jackson, Lori Nazry, and Candy Messersmith helped organize the event at Rumberger’s downtown Orlando office. William “Bud” Kirk, Jr., welcomed guests, and local attorney and friend of Paul C. Perkins, Leon Handley, spoke before the group of more than 30 judges from the 10th, 18th and Ninth judicial circuits, the Middle District of Florida, and the Fifth District Court of Appeal, honoring the late Mr. Perkins for his work with the NAACP and his enduring fight to promote and protect the rights of African Americans. In 1965, Mayor Bob Carr of Orlando appointed Paul C. Perkins to the position of city prosecutor, the first African American in the state to hold such a position. Paul C. Perkins, Jr., was also in attendance at the reception to honor his father. Pictured from the left are Chief Judge Belvin Perry, Jr.; Judge Timothy Coon; Judge Emerson R. Thompson, Jr.; Magistrate Odessia Y. Joyner; Judge Theotis Bronson; Chief Judge James E. C. Perry; and Florida A&M Law Dean Percy R. Luney, Jr. Attorneys and CPAs to meet in Coral Gables The Second Annual South Florida Goodwill Gathering of attorneys and CPAs is set for May 12 in Coral Gables. The event — to run from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on the 12th floor of the Commercebank building at 220 Alhambra Circle — is being coordinated by The Florida Bar Committee on Relations with Certified Public Accountants and sponsored by the Dade County Bar Association; Miami-Downtown, Broward, South Dade, and Miami-Dade County chapters of the Florida Institute of Certified Public Accountants; and Florida Association of Attorney – Certified Public Accountants. If you are interested in attending, contact Jennifer at Arista & Feldman by calling (305) 444-7662 or online at: www.AFLawyers.com by May 9. Court sets rules oral arguments The Supreme Court has set oral arguments in a number of rules cases, including: • In Re: Amendments to the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar, Case No. SC04-2246 — Wednesday, June 8. • In Re: Amendments to the Florida Rules of Civil Procedure (Two Year Cycle), Case No. SC05-179 – Wednesday, June 8. • In Re: Amendments to the Rules Regulating The Florida Bar, Case No. SC05-206 – Thursday, June 9. • In Re: Amendments to the Florida Rule of Criminal Procedure 3.172, Case No. SC04-2255 — Thursday, June 9. • In Re: Amendments to the Rules of Judicial Administration (Two Year Cycle), Case No. SC05-173 – Thursday, June 9. • In Re: Report of the Alternative Dispute Resolution Rules and Policy Committee on Senior Judges as Mediators, Case No. SC04-2482 —— Friday, June 10. For more information go to http://jweb.flcourts.org/pls/docket/ds_docket_search. Briefs May 1, 2005 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Calif. Drug Kingpin Sentenced for Suffolk Smuggling

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York William WrightA California drug kingpin was sentenced Tuesday to 13 1/2 years in New York State prison for running a cross-country multi-million-dollar cocaine trafficking ring that also smuggled marijuana from Canada to Long Island.William Wright had pleaded guilty last week at Suffolk County court to conspiracy, money laundering and criminal possession of a controlled substance.Prosecutors said the 35-year-old West Hollywood man was busted shipping 175 kilos of cocaine from California to Suffolk in secret compartments in luxury vehicles.The vehicles were shipped in car-carrying tractor trailers used by unwitting auto dealers.Wright bought the cocaine for $20,500 per kilo on the west coast and sold it in Suffolk “for a price approximately five times that amount, after the drug was cut and prepared for street sales,” District Attorney Tom Spota said.Wright also shipped $1.1 million hidden inside a Mercedes back to California and smuggled large amounts of high-grade marijuana, between 10 and 300 pounds at a time, from Canada to Suffolk, authorities said.He had 30 kilos of cocaine hidden inside a trap in a Nissan 350Z at the time of his arrest.last_img read more

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How to build a reputation as an expert

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first_imgBecoming known for a big idea can turbocharge your career.by: Anne FisherDear Annie: I’m working on an MBA in finance and, as part of a class project, I came up with a new way of valuing companies for IPOs or acquisitions, using a set of readily available data that bankers and investors don’t usually consider. I’ve tested my model on dozens of companies, both real and hypothetical, and it’s extremely accurate. A friend (and former Wall Street coworker) tells me this approach could make me very marketable in my field, but it isn’t helping my “personal brand” if no one knows about it. My question is, how do you get attention for an idea without just putting it out there where someone else could steal it? — Anonymous So FarDear ASF: It’s a classic innovator’s dilemma. “People often worry that a great idea will be stolen,” notes Dorie Clark, who teaches business administration at Duke University’s Fuqua B-school and wrote a new book that might interest you, Stand Out: How to Find Your Breakthrough Idea and Build a Following Around It. “But writing and speaking about it protects you from that.”The most important thing, she explains, is to “start creating as much content as you can, so that the idea becomes identified with you and people recognize it as yours. Imagine the reaction if, for example, someone wrote a book about women’s empowerment in business called Lean In. That title and concept have become so identified with Sheryl Sandburg that no one would take an imitator seriously.” continue reading » 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Sag Harbor: Former Black Enclave & Home To Historic AME Church

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York This article is a companion piece to “Borne Out Of Racism, Defiant AME Church Preaches Social Justice Through Gospel.”Donnamarie Barnes had such fond memories of her family’s bungalow on Lighthouse Lane in Sag Harbor that when it came time for her to settle down she decided to call the picturesque Hamptons village her home. The novelty of months-long summer escapes never wore off—and even till this day that childlike serenity swirls around her as she basks in the summertime joy that envelopes Sag Harbor.The 55-year-old retired People magazine photo editor reminisces about summers in Sag Harbor: barbeques, rainy days at the movies, cooling down with spoonfuls of ice cream, making new friends. She was 6 months old when her parents first took the long trip from the Bronx to the East End of LI, a winding, scenic journey that took the family on the LIE and along Veterans Memorial Highway in Commack and then east through Riverhead. Once they saw the Big Duck in Flanders in the distance, the family knew their summertime oasis was close by.“Hold your breath because we’re going by the duck farm,” was the joke in the car.At the time, Sag Harbor was a black enclave that offered comfort the big city could not provide.“It was family,” says Barnes. “The mothers would stay with the kids during the week; the fathers would be in the city working and would come on weekends. We would go to the beach. Every. Single. Day.” A smile forms as if Barnes is a teenager again.In the 1800s Sag Harbor was a diverse community. Declared the first official port of entry for the United States by the Second Session of Congress in 1789, the village was a booming international whaling port—even boasting “more square-rigged vessels engaged in commerce than the port of New York,” according to the Sag Harbor Historical Society. Free blacks, Native Americans and Europeans mingled together despite disparate cultural backgrounds. It was their shared occupation that helped them coexist. Most of the men were whalers and merchants, meaning they’d be sequestered on ships for months at a time. Bonds were formed.Those relationships were important because Sag Harbor wasn’t immune to the insidious spread of racism, which turned black Methodists into religious nomads.In response, pious free blacks and marginalized Native Americans decided to build their own church in 1840, which was named St. David AME Zion.Over the course of generations the congregation dwindled to the point where the AME Zion Church had to end its mission there. The church still exists but is now home to a Baptist congregation. In the 1980s the trustees of AME Zion Church signed the deed over to the Eastville Community Historical Society.“It had this sort of aura of mystery to it,” Barnes says of St. David, which she never attended. “There was something about it that was important but I didn’t understand…there was a presence in these streets. That was comforting in a way—we were told this was a black community.”Georgette Grier-Key of the Eastville Community Historical Society in Sag Harbor. (Rashed Mian/Long Island Press)On a humid summer day in Sag Harbor, Georgette Grier-Key of the Eastville Community Historical Society is leafing through piles of news articles about St. David’s AME Zion Church. Much of it has to do with old folklore about the church being a stop on the Underground Railroad and the trapdoor that was used to hide runaway slaves.According to an April 14, 1988 issue of The Southampton Press, a black historian named Charles L. Blockson wrote an article in that summer’s edition of the National Geographic headlined “Escape from Slavery: The Underground Railroad,” in which he touched on potential routes through LI used to transport slaves.“Portuguese fisherman,” Blockson reported, “are said to have conspired with members of the Shinnecock tribe to transport fugitive slaves from the north shore of Long Island into ports of freedom in Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island.” The Southampton Press noted that some “of these runaway slaves did not go further but remained in the area, intermarrying with the Shinnecocks.”Whether St. David was indeed a stop on the Underground Railroad, we’ll probably never know. Still, the AME Zion Church was a refuge for the small whaling community.Grier-Key makes the short walk across to Eastville Avenue and motions at St. David. The church’s wood siding is weathered and some overgrown shrubbery obstructs the St. David AME Zion sign. The church was remodeled in 1891—a half century after its founding. Not much has changed since then, allowing the church to maintain a semblance of modest beginnings.Like many AME churches today, St. David was a safe place for locals to have social and political gatherings.It was the “the nucleus of the community,” Grier-Key explains. “The community is a reflection of the church and the church is a reflection of the community. These are marginalized people.“Basically the Native Americans have been run off their land so they have no place to go so they come here,” she continues. “African Americans come here because they hear there’s some lax rules, and there’s a colony of free blacks, so they know they’re welcome here. You have a lot of free people—emancipated people—from Virginia coming because they know there is a connection, there’s a place to worship, there’s other people that look like me.”St. David AME Zion Cemetery, opened in 1857. (Rashed Mian/Long Island Press)There were also those who arrived at St. David’s seeking sanctuary.Even cemeteries were segregated, prompting St. David to open its own burial ground up the street.“St. David AME Zion Cemetery CA 1857,” blares a historic marker along the cemetery. “Final resting place of early settlers, African Americans, Native Americans and European Ancestry.”Rev. J.P. Thompson, St. David’s first pastor and a noted abolitionist who eventually rose to become an AME bishop, is buried there along with his wife. Thompson died in May 1862, according to his grass-stained tombstone.St. David AME Zion Church’s congregation decreased so much over the years that it is now a Baptist church. But the historic building is still a reminder of how important it was—and still is—for disenfranchised groups to have a place of refuge. Those lessons are still being taught today.“When most people are doing research on black history or black populations,” says Grier-Key, “they often start with the AME Zion Church.”For more on the AME Church, click herelast_img read more

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