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October 15 1997 Eleanor Jonathan and Monica

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first_imgOctober 15, 1997Eleanor, Jonathan and Monica.last_img

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On May 9th Forum Uranium Corp and Mega Uranium L

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first_imgOn May 9th, Forum Uranium Corp. and Mega Uranium Ltd. announced a new basement-hosted uranium discovery on the Opie target on  the NW Athabasca property. Seven of nine holes drilled on the Opie zone encountered uranium mineralization at shallow depths,  within a zone of strong red hydrothermal alteration in basement rocks. The zone remains open along strike and down dip, so there is great potential for more mineralization within the zone. There are 15 more gravity targets , untested by drilling, which could prove to be multiple mineralized zones on the property. With further discoveries like Forum’s,  the western Athabasca Basin, could prove to be on the same scale as the Eastern Athabasca Basin. Attached is the link to a more descriptive analysis of the discovery and buy recommendation issued by Dundee Securities. GLD added 67,954 troy ounces of gold…but over at SLV an authorized participant added a whopping 3,299,537 ounces of silver.It was nice to see some positive price action in gold for a change…and by 3:00 p.m. Hong Kong time it was up about ten bucks…and was still up ten dollars going into the London p.m. gold fix, which came shortly before 10:00 a.m. in New York.The gold price then jumped about $15 once the fix was in…and by lunchtime in New York, it had reached its high of day, which Kitco recorded as $1,584.80 spot.  From there, gold got sold off ten dollars in short order…and then traded sideways into the close of electronic trading.Gold closed the Thursday session at $1,574.30 spot…up $34.00 on the day.  Net volume was immense once again at 182,000 contracts.Silver had a pretty decent day as well…and was up about 50 cents by 3:00 p.m. Hong Kong time.  From there the price slid until 1:00 p.m. in London…about twenty minutes before the Comex open.  From there, the silver price rose in fits and starts until noon in New York.  And, like gold, that was the high tick of the day…$28.35 spot…and from there silver got sold off to the $28 mark at the close of Comex trading…and then traded flat into the close electronic trading at 5:15 p.m. Eastern time.Silver finished the Thursday trading day at $28.05 spot…up 78 cents.  Volume was pretty heavy at 44,000 contracts.The dollar index oscillated within about a 40 basis point price range yesterday…bouncing off the 81.6 price level for the second time in as many day…and finished up about 15 basis points.  Not much to see here.The gold stocks gapped up at the open in New York.  The London p.m. gold fix at 10:00 a.m…and the New York high at noon yesterday, are the most prominent features on this chart.  After the high tick was in, the stocks faded a bit, but held onto a large portion of their gains.  The HUI finished up 4.45%.For the most part, the silver stocks were on fire yesterday, but three of the seven stocks that make up Nick Laird’s Silver Sentiment Index did not share in the fun…and the SSI finished up only 2.87%.(Click on image to enlarge)The CME’s Daily Delivery Report was another yawner, which it has a tendency to become once we get past the first full week of deliveries in any delivery month.  They reported that 35 gold and 21 silver contracts were posted for delivery on Monday.Both GLD and SLV had changes to report yesterday.  GLD added 67,954 troy ounces of gold…but over at SLV an authorized participant added a whopping 3,299,537 ounces of silver.  Considering the lousy silver price action of earlier this week…and the smallish increase in the price of silver yesterday…I would assume [like the counterintuitive deposit in SLV on Monday] that this deposit had something to do with covering a short position.  But, as I mentioned yesterday, we won’t really know for sure until the report comes out over at shortsqueeze.com next week…and even then I don’t think that this addition will be in it, because I believe that it occurred after the cut-off date.  We’ll see.The U.S. Mint did not have a sales report yesterday.Over at the Comex-approved depositories on Wednesday, they reported receiving 605,838 troy ounces of silver…and shipped 288,396 ounces of the stuff out the door.  The link to that action is here.Today’s first chart is courtesy of Washington state reader S.A.  As you can see, it’s the 3-year dollar index…and as one commentator over at Zero Hedge put it yesterday…”When the US dollar is your ‘safe haven’, you know you’ve hit rock bottom.”  Amen to that.(Click on image to enlarge)Here’s another happy looking chart…and should make everyone on a ‘blue pill’ diet feel a little better.  The chart and dialogue say it all.(Click on image to enlarge)I said I was going to post the charts on silver yesterday that German gold analyst Dimitri Speck sent me earlier this week, but they got preempted by others, so here they are now.  The first one is the 14-year silver chart from August 1998 to the end of 2011.  Three stand-out features are the 12 o’clock noon London silver fix…and in New York it’s the secondary decline at the London p.m. gold fix at 10:00 a.m. Eastern time…and, surprisingly enough, the high for silver on average over the last fourteen years of Comex trading comes at twelve o’clock noon in New York…exactly what happened with silver during yesterday’s price action.  You can read into that what you wish.(Click on image to enlarge)Dimitri’s second chart for silver is just for 2011…and even a cursory glance tells you that it’s an entirely different looking beast than the previous chart.  Now the three stand-out features on this chart are the usual London silver fix at noon local time…but the high in Comex trading in New York is now 10:30 a.m….not noon.  And the amazing thing is that there is now a secondary low equivalent to the London silver fix that occurs shortly after 3:00 p.m. in electronic trading…and the whole chart has a negative bias to it as well.  As you can tell, the selling in the New York session last year became much more ferocious once the high was in for the day.(Click on image to enlarge)Dimitri’s gold Intraday Price Movements charts for gold showed up on the Internet about ten years ago and caused a sensation when they did.  This is the first time he’s done it for silver, so these charts are new for me as well.I have the usual number of stories…and I hope you find a few that float your boat.The vast majority of people do not seek wisdom; they seek affirmation of their core beliefs. – Author unknownI don’t know what to make of yesterday’s price action.  I was certainly happy to see prices move higher…but I found the huge volume that went with it rather disturbing.  I’d rather see light volume on big price moves…and that certainly wasn’t the case yesterday.Well, all the stories that I’ve been posting this week have led me…and probably yourself…to the obvious conclusion that the entire world is starting to float off the rails, especially in Europe.  But don’t kid yourself, if Greece goes, it won’t be too long before the rest of the E.U…and it’s beloved currency…follow it down the drain.  Right after that will come the rest of the world, as the economic, financial and monetary systems of this planet are one giant Gordian Knot…and no amount of cheating or ‘thinking outside the box’ will make any difference.  There’s no way out of this where there will be one man standing.  And if there is one man standing, it will redefine the word Pyrrhic Victory.The only thing left of value will be hard assets…with gold and silver at the top of the list…whether it is remonetized or not.Today we get the much anticipated [at least by me] Commitment of Traders Report…and as I’ve mentioned several times already this week, it will be one for the record books.  I’m particularly interested in seeing the situation in silver…the Commercial net short position…and the positions of the ‘1-4’ and ‘5-8’ short holders in that metal.  It’s just too bad that it won’t include what happened during the 24 hours and 15 minutes after the Tuesday cut-off, as that included the absolute low.Here’s the Total PMs Pool for all precious metals that Nick Laird keeps updated on a daily basis.  We just hit another new high [barely] in physical ounces in all four precious metals combined.  If you check the period from the end of December to the close of trading yesterday on this chart, you will see that the ‘total ounces held’ has been in a permanent up-trend.  During that time period gold rose and fell about $250…and silver rose and fell more than $10…platinum rose and fell about $310…and palladium rose and fell about $150.  None of this price movement had anything to do with the physical market…it was all paper trading in the Comex futures market.(Click on image to enlarge)The gold price did nothing through all of Far East trading on their Friday afternoon, but shortly after London opened, the price has ticked up about ten bucks.  Silver traded within a 20 cent range during the same time period, but is also up in mid-morning London trading.  Volume’s are already monstrous, so it’s obvious that these rallies are running into massive resistance from JPMorgan et al.  It will be interesting to see how things unfold once trading begins in New York at 8:20 a.m. Eastern time.And as I hit the ‘send’ button at 5:20 a.m. Eastern time, it appears that the rallies in both gold and silver have been stopped in their respective tracks for the moment.  Gold is currently up ten bucks…and silver is only up 17 cents.There’s still the opportunity to either readjust your portfolio, or get fully invested in the continuing major up-leg of this bull market in both silver and gold…and I respectfully suggest that you take a trial subscription to either Casey Research’s International Speculator [junior gold and silver exploration companies], or BIG GOLD [large producers], with all our best (and current) recommendations…as well as the archives. Don’t forget that our 90-day guarantee of satisfaction is in effect for both publications.I hope you have a good weekend…and I’ll see here tomorrow sometime. Sponsor Advertisementlast_img read more

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By Chris Wood Senior Analyst We know that we and

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first_imgBy Chris Wood, Senior AnalystWe know that we (and all living systems) inherit our genetic traits through a naturally occurring information storage system known as deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA. DNA consists of a linear sequence of the chemical bases adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine (denoted by the symbols A, C, G, and T), attached to a repeating linear chain made up of alternating sugar and phosphate segments and bound together with hydrogen bonds in a double helix to complementary bases. The “A” of one strand always forms a base pair with the “T” of the other strand, and “C” always forms a base pair with “G.”Our molecular blueprint for life, the haploid human genome, comprises approximately three billion DNA base pairs, divided into 23 pairs of chromosomes ranging in size from about 50 million to 250 million bases. Contained within these chromosomes are approximately 23,000 smaller regions, called genes, each one containing the recipe for a protein or group of related proteins that are produced in a linear, step-by-step process.First (and we’ve simplified things here), in transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase converts the DNA strand base for base into messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA has the same sequence as the DNA, except that thymine (T) is replaced with uracil (U). The mRNA then carries the information out of the cell nucleus into the cytoplasm for the second step in protein production, called translation.Once in the cytoplasm, the mRNA interacts with a specialized complex called a ribosome, which “reads” the sequence of mRNA bases and translates them into proteins. These proteins go on to play key roles in the structure and function of all cells, including the regulation and execution of subsequent transcription and translation.This flow of information from DNA to RNA to proteins is one of the fundamental principles of molecular biology – so important that it is sometimes called the “central dogma.”The important takeaway for our purposes is that DNA itself is trapped in the cell nucleus. It’s RNA’s job to get the information out of the nucleus and into the cytoplasm, transforming you from a chemical recipe to a real living, breathing human. Because of RNA we can build proteins. We are made of proteins. In other words, RNA builds life. And that’s big.But there is something else amazing about RNA that could revolutionize how doctors treat many (if not most) chronic human diseases. And nobody knew about it until just a few years ago.Back in 1986, a geneticist named Rich Jorgensen was working at a small biotech startup in California. He was tasked with creating a spectacular new flower, to help attract venture capital funding for the company. His plan was to create a very, very purple petunia. So he inserted an extra copy of the purple-producing gene into the plant’s DNA. But instead of producing purple, Jorgensen’s petunia instead bloomed with white flowers, the complete opposite of what the scientist expected. Inserting the extra purple-producing gene had resulted in the flowers completely losing their pigmentation. This was a big puzzle. And it took another decade of scientific research (and countless experiments with flowers, fruit flies, worms, and other organisms) to figure out what was going on.Completely by accident, Jorgensen had stumbled upon an ancient secret inside living cells – a process that cells use to turn down, or silence, the activity of specific genes. This process is now known as RNA interference, or RNAi.RNAi is thought to have evolved about a billion years ago, as a cellular defense mechanism against invaders such as RNA viruses and to combat the spread of harmful, mutation-causing genetic elements called transposons, within a cell’s DNA. It works by destroying the messenger (mRNAs) carrying genetic information to the cell’s protein factories. By killing the mRNAs and not allowing the protein specified by that gene to be made, the gene is rendered essentially inactive.When Jorgensen inserted the extra purple-producing gene into the petunia’s DNA, it triggered the cell’s RNAi to silence all the purple-producing genes because the cell thought the recipe for the protein looked fishy. Exactly why the cell thought this is a bit too complex to go into here. But in very simple terms, the instructions Jorgensen inserted to make more purple happened to have a suspicious viral shape.What’s important is that with RNAi, scientists had discovered a way to effectively silence genes one at a time (by shutting down the protein-building process), just based on knowing their sequence. Since many, if not most, chronic human diseases result from inappropriate protein production or improper protein activity, the implications for the treatment of disease were profound. Cancer, HIV and other infectious diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases – all became theoretical fair game for treatment with RNAi therapeutics.And so, not too long after the discovery of RNAi in 1998 – by Craig Mello and Andrew Fire (who were awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for the discovery) – came the hype. Drugs based on RNAi were said to be the next major class of human therapeutics. Big pharma and small biotech firms alike pumped a flood of money into RNAi-based drug development.The boom phase in RNAi got rolling in 2005 and lasted through about 2008. During that time we saw a bidding war break out for access to potentially gate-keeping RNAi intellectual property and several billion dollars in investments in the space by big pharma. Merck paid $1.1 billion to acquire Sirna Therapeutics, and Roche paid more than $300 million for a limited platform license from Alnylam (arguably the global leader when it comes to RNAi IP). The industry loved the attention, and the media fanned the flames. Consequently, unrealistic expectations set in, and investors fell prey to the mistaken notion that the technical barriers to exploiting RNAi in medicine were relatively low.The industry was in for a wake-up call, however, when the difficulty surrounding RNAi drug delivery came to light. The drugs (comprised of what’s called small interfering RNA, or “siRNA”) break down quickly in the bloodstream; and even if they reach the cells in the body where they are needed, they have trouble entering the cells. Once the mistake of putting IP ahead of enablement was recognized a backlash ensued, and there was a severe crisis of confidence in the potential of RNAi thereapeutics. Novartis ended its five-year partnership with Alnylam in September 2010. Shortly thereafter, Roche, one of the world’s biggest spenders on drug R&D, terminated its RNAi program altogether. Stock prices of companies operating in the space plummeted.Just recently, however, we’ve started to see a comeback in RNAi. The recovery is based not on hype, but on sound science and clinical successes, which should pique investors’ interest. Technical hurdles remain but are being overcome, and companies are advancing drug candidates in the clinic. Alnylam, for example, now has four RNAi drugs in clinical trials and is on pace to have five RNAi therapeutic programs in advanced clinical development by 2015. Together with collaborators at MIT, the company also recently announced the discovery of “core-shell” nanoparticles that have optimal chemical and physical properties for effective, systemic intracellular delivery of RNAi therapeutics. The findings were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. And Alnylam is by no means the only one making advances in the RNAi space.Earlier this year, scientists from MIT, led by Paula Hammond, came up with a novel delivery vehicle in which RNA is packed into microspheres so dense that they withstand degradation until they reach their target. The new system, which was described in the journal Nature Materials in late February, supposedly knocks down expression of specific genes as effectively as existing delivery methods, but with a much smaller dose of particles.Whether RNAi therapeutics can ever live up to the hype they experienced in the early 2000s remains highly uncertain. Perhaps the technical hurdles will ultimately be too much to overcome. Or perhaps a new technology will come along that renders the therapeutics obsolete before they ever make it out of the clinic. [Ed Note: Researchers from the University of Florida have recently created what they call nanozymes, which is a new type of nanoparticle conjugate that mimics RNAi.]Nevertheless, RNAi has the potential to usher in a new order of medicine, the likes of which we’ve only rarely seen. And while investing in the space is highly speculative and requires a lot of due diligence, there is the potential for uncovering a stock that returns several times your initial investment. Good hunting. Bits & BytesHacking Your Hand (Technology Review)Generally speaking, we like to devise things that become extensions of our physical faculties. With hands, we’ve come up with everything from baseball bats to martini glasses to robot surgical machines. But what do we think of a human hand as becoming an extension of a machine? That may not seem like it has any practical applications, like hitting a home run or performing a double bypass. Still, it hasn’t stopped the Japanese from inventing the “PossessedHand,” an apparatus that can actually control your hand for you. What this might say about the creator’s psyche is perhaps best left unexplored.Gmail Mining (Fox News)Do you want Google to play dumpster diver, pawing through your Gmail, looking for commercial tie-ins? Well, as of yesterday, that’s a choice being offered to a million Gmail users (out of 425 million accounts). The bridge Google has constructed between its search engine and email service will mine the correspondence stored within a user’s Gmail account for any data tied to a search request. If that’s too creepy, rest assured that this feature is opt-in only. For now, anyway.How to Land on Mars (SlashGear)The landing of the large exploration vehicle Curiosity on Mars was a grand technological achievement. The article at the link, actually written before touchdown, explains how it would be accomplished. Lots of links, graphics, video. Call it Martian Invasion 101…Facebook Expands Advertising for Mobile (Tech Crunch)Until now, every Facebook mobile ad had to be triggered by your or a friend’s activity, but as of Tuesday Facebook began testing a new non-social ad unit that lets developers buy mobile news-feed ads that open Android and iOS App Store purchase pages when clicked. It’s a move aimed at persuading investors that it’s moving forward with new monetization ideas, but the company will have to tread very carefully to avoid alienating users.last_img read more

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Welcome to Invisibilia Season 4 The NPR program a

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first_imgWelcome to Invisibilia Season 4! The NPR program and podcast explores the invisible forces that shape human behavior, and we here at Shots are joining in to probe the science of why we act the way we do. In Episode 4, they’re asking: are we destined to repeat our patterns or do we generally stray in surprising directions? – a question increasingly relevant in an age when algorithms are trying to predict everything about our behavior. Here’s an excerpt from the episode.On paper, Shon Hopwood’s life doesn’t make a lot of sense, not even to him.”I don’t have a great excuse as to why I did these things. And everybody always wants that,” he tells me. “It closes the circle for people. But that’s not really how it happened.”To the naked eye, it looked like Shon Hopwood was born into a really good pattern. He grew up in the neighborly, low-crime community of David City, Neb., to a great Christian family that encouraged self-reliance. “My parents basically opened the door in the morning and would say, ‘See you in a few hours.’ It was a good childhood.”Fresh air, loving family, safe community: Those are some pretty good patterns.But for some reason, in college, Hopwood started veering off the graph. He wasn’t that interested in school, so he dropped out and returned to David City to work, and that was all going fine, until one day when his friend Tom asked him down to the bar for a drink.”And he just asked me, he said, ‘What do you think about robbing a bank?,’ ” Hopwood says.”And you know most people would have said, ‘No!’ Or ‘What are you talking about?’ Or walked away, or a million other responses. And my response was, ‘Yes! This is a great idea!’ “And so Hopwood’s path forked. He would become a bank robber.Of course Hopwood had second thoughts. He had them right up to the moment he walked into the bank dressed as a handyman. “I walk in the bank and I pull a mask up and I drop the tool box on the ground. It makes a huge noise so everyone turns and looks at me. And I unzip my coveralls, pull out a 22[-caliber] rifle and yell, ‘Everyone get down. This is a robbery!’ “After that Hopwood recruited a small group of friends and just hit one bank after another until one day, four guys from the FBI tackled him. He was sentenced to 12 years in prison, which was bad enough, but what really cut was that a bunch of people in his hometown disowned his completely blameless parents.”They have to have some reason for why I did these things, because otherwise it just doesn’t compute. Because it didn’t make any sense that me and the people that were involved with me had robbed these banks. I mean one of my co-defendants was the son of the town attorney,” he says.We need to find a predictable pattern, and when it eludes us, we ache for it.Now, because we live in the age of computers, our ability to discern patterns has expanded. Today a computer can scan more data in a minute than you or I could sift in a lifetime, and in that data see things we could never see. Beautiful things and horrible things and even — we’re told — the future.A competition to find the patterns that determine the path of a human lifeAbout two years ago a Princeton sociologist named Matthew Salganik decided to stage a massive computer competition.The idea was inspired by Netflix. In 2006, the company distributed huge amounts of user data to programmers all over the world so they could write computer models that found hidden patterns that improved its predictions for which movies subscribers would like. The competition totally worked out for Netflix. The companies movie choice predictions substantially improved.So Salganik’s plan was to do the exact same thing, except instead of staging a competition to improve predictions of movie preference, he wanted the competition to improve predictions about the things sociologists cared about: high school GPA, which child would persevere when faced with adversity, who would become homeless. Could we, he wondered, harness the pattern-finding abilities of computers to discover new things about how individual lives turned out?”Looking at lots of people and looking at broader patterns helps us have a fuller understanding of what’s possible,” Salganik says. If his competition worked well, it could make the world a better place. After all, if computers could locate the things that predicted stuff like higher grades, policy makers could design better interventions.So Salganik set to work. He got a massive trove of data on 5,000 kids who had been followed from the day they were born, then made that information available to data geeks and researchers across the globe. Four hundred teams were given incredibly detailed information about the kids from birth until age nine, then told to predict their grades — and a handful of other outcomes — at age 15.One day last fall, Salganik sat down to crunch the numbers, figure out which models were best able to predict where the children in the study had ended up, and what he found deeply surprised him.What Salganik wanted to see was at least one computer model entry able to predict with reasonable accuracy the outcomes of each child in the study.But none of the computer models did as well as Salganik expected.If they had, the screen in front of him would have been filled with tall, colorful towers — bars stretching from the floor of the y-axis to the top, indicating that the predictions had gotten close to 100 percent accurate. Instead what he saw was a bunch of squat bars crowded around the bottom like flattened mushrooms, indicating that the predictions were a lot closer to 0 percent accurate than 100 percent.”I would say this is not impressive,” he tells me as he looks at the graph. “I think this is sad. Disappointing.”But was it? Or was it just an accurate representation of how unpredictable our individual lives are?Duncan Watts works at Microsoft Research. He does computational social science, including prediction studies similar to the one that Salganik was doing. In fact over the years, Watts says, he’s done tons. He says when it comes to predicting stuff like what will happen in a particular human life, Watts thinks the outcome that Salganik found is just the outcome.”We find exactly the same pattern everywhere we look… when you’re talking about individual outcomes, there’s a lot of randomness,” Watts says.”And the other half of this conversation is that people don’t like that answer, and so they keep wanting a different answer. They say nature abhors a vacuum. Humans abhor randomness. We like deterministic stories,” Duncan says.We like the idea that patterns can tell us what will happen in life because that idea makes us feel more secure he says.”If you think you can predict things— even if you’re wrong — it means that you get up in the morning and you feel confident,” Watts says. “And so you can invest your time and energy today in things that won’t pay off until tomorrow.”Watts believes being more realistic about patterns is important but hard to pull off because it involves accepting something that feels like a contradiction: that patterns are important and predictive — you can identify things in the lives of kids that tend to help or hurt them — but you can’t say for sure whether those same things would influence the life of any individual kid because randomness has a lot more power over complex things like life than we like to think.Randomness, Watts says, is as important as pattern, though obviously it doesn’t get the same respect in our algorithmic world.A life that no one could predict turns againWhich brings us back to the unusual trajectory of Shon Hopwood.Hopwood was working in the prison law library, checking out books, when a fellow prisoner asked him for help with his case. The guy wanted help to draft a petition the U.S. Supreme Court.Hopwood had never studied law and only had a high school education but he wanted to be helpful so he spent two months working on an argument, then sent off the petition and basically forgot about it.”Then one day I’m walking out to the recreation yard at 6:30,” Hopwood says, “and a friend of mine comes running and screaming out of the housing unit. And this being federal prison my first thought is, ‘What did I say to this guy yesterday that he wants to come and fight me at 6:30 in the morning?’ “The Supreme Court had accepted the appeal he had written.That highly unusual event led to other unusual turns in trajectory, until one fine day, Hopwood found himself moving a box of belongings into a small office at Georgetown University Law School.The bank robber had become a law professor.Proof that even though we yearn for predictable patterns, no matter how many computers we have, it might just be impossible to predict where any single life will go. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

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In 1983 Utah was the first state to lower its blo

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first_imgIn 1983, Utah was the first state to lower its blood alcohol limit from 0.10 to 0.08 for impaired driving. It would take nearly two decades for every state to follow suit, but as they did, the nation’s rate of alcohol-related traffic deaths dropped 10 percent. Now, Utah is pioneering the move to lower it once again. Beginning Dec. 30 — yes, the day before New Year’s Eve — Utahns will have to be extra careful about drinking and driving. On Sunday, the state’s blood alcohol content limit will drop from 0.08 percent to 0.05 percent, marking the strictest DUI law in the country.To give you an idea of the difference in consumption, for a man weighing 180 pounds, it takes about four drinks to reach a BAC of 0.08 percent, according to the American Beverage Institute. But to reach .05, it’s about half as many drinks and can be even fewer for women.Utah law limits the type of and strength of alcohol depending on where it is purchased, with different limits on beer and heavy beer.Still, the current limit of .08 is “a significant amount of drinking” for a lot of people, says Utah state Rep. Norm Thurston, a Republican.Thurston sponsored the bill to lower the limit in 2017 at the request of the National Transportation Safety Board, which has been urging states to lower DUI limits to 0.05 since 2013.Thurston says he believes the new limit will save lives because it sends a strict message to anyone who has been drinking not to get behind the wheel. “You would think that we’re already there as a society,” but Thurston says he meets a lot of people who say they think it’s safe to drink and drive, “just a little bit.”Critics slammed the Republican, a practicing member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, for running the bill. The church urges its members not to consume alcohol, and many accused him, as a Mormon, of trying to legislate drinkers and non-Mormons.The American Beverage Institute, an alcohol trade organization, has been a vocal critic of the law. Spokesman Jackson Shedelbower says he doesn’t believe the change will save lives. The lower limit targets social, moderate drinkers, not “legitimately drunk drivers,” he says.”Nearly 70 percent of alcohol-related fatalities in this country are caused by someone with … a BAC of 0.15 and above,” Shedlbower says, three times the new limit in Utah.So, will drunken driving arrests in Utah increase starting Dec. 30? Probably not, says Sgt. Nick Street with the Utah Highway Patrol.”Troopers and officers throughout the state should already be arresting based on impairment, not based on a per se limit, and that standard is not going to change,” he says.Street says he believes the law has already changed drivers’ behaviors, even though it hasn’t taken effect yet.”I think people are making better decisions on the front end of a night,” by using ride-hailing apps or choosing designated drivers. Copyright 2018 KUER 90.1. To see more, visit KUER 90.1.last_img read more

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Science has some bad news for the bearded young c

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first_imgScience has some bad news for the bearded: young children think you’re really, really unattractive.A new study suggests that, until they reach puberty, kids are strongly anti-beard — although children with bearded fathers did feel more warmly toward facial hair.Scientists going all the way back to Charles Darwin have pondered the purpose of beards. Darwin, who spent his later years sporting a large, bushy beard, thought beards had somehow helped men charm the opposite sex.”Until very recent history, beards were a very prominent element of men’s faces, and so we must have expectations related to those, and it turns out that adults do,” says Nicole Nelson, a researcher at the University of Queensland in Australia who studies face perception.Actual scientific research on beards is, regrettably, scant. But Nelson says that over the last decade or so, work pioneered by her colleague Barnaby Dixson has shown that beards make men look older, stronger and more masculine — at least, to adults.”And so we were wondering whether or not all of those expectations emerge in adulthood or if they are there throughout our lives,” says Nelson.Her team tested this in 470 kids, from toddlers to teenagers. Researchers had kids look at a series of paired photos. Each pair showed a man with a beard and the same man clean-shaven, presented side-by-side.”Then we just ask kids, ‘Which man looks stronger?’ ‘Which man looks older?’ ‘Which man looks best?'” explains Nelson.Even little kids associated beards with being older and stronger. But when asked which face looked “best,” young kids overwhelmingly avoided bearded men.”As early as 1 year 9 months, they dislike beards,” says Nelson, “and kids, as they got older, up to about 13 years, continue to dislike beards even more.”Interestingly, around the age of puberty, young peoples’ views changed. “Kids all of a sudden had a jump in beard preferences,” says Nelson. They started to like beards more and judged them more like adults do.”So it seems like probably other people’s faces mean different things to children depending on where they are developmentally,” she explains.And personal experience seems to count, too — because “having a bearded father was associated with positive judgements of bearded faces,” according to the researchers’ report in the journal Evolution and Human Behavior.Nelson says that she and her colleagues have been doing additional studies of how children perceive bearded men. In one, kids engage with a story that involves a magical island and a series of challenges. Children tended to pick bearded men to help them with feats involving strength, such as fighting a dragon or moving a large stone. But for tasks that involved trustworthiness, like hiding a treasure map, children preferred a smooth-faced partner.”The understanding that beards are linked to strength is there very early, but they don’t seem to trust beards at all,” says Nelson.Research shows that beards seem to enhance observers’ ability to recognize facial expressions associated with anger, but not other emotions. Beards did not seem to offer any competitive advantage in mixed martial arts fighting, however, suggesting that beards might offer “dishonest signals of formidability.”Other studies of beards suggest that women, especially women with children, may perceive bearded men as better potential fathers.So the decision of whether or not to grow a beard means weighing the various pros and cons, says Nelson.”I think it’s a good move if you want to kind of boost your manliness — if you want to look a little more dominant, you want to look a little bit older,” she says. “Those things come along with children being slightly afraid of you. If you want to chat with children, you might not want a beard.” Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

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Repurposing Old Tech Equipment

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first_img The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Add to Queue October 1, 2005 Next Article 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List With the mountains of old cell phones, computers, TVs and various other outdated technological products piling up, savvy entrepreneurs are getting into the business of e-cycling. According to an industry report from the International Association of Electronics Recyclers, 1.5 billion pounds of electronic equipment are processed annually, and the association estimates that around 3 billion units of consumer electronics will be scrapped in the next decade. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates around 55 million PCs will be landfilled and 150 million PCs recycled in 2005.There’s quite a buzz going on right now within the technology recycling arena, according to Rick Goss, director of environmental affairs at the Electronic Industries Alliance, a partnership representing U.S. technology manufacturers. He points to states like California and Maine, which have recently enacted programs to mandate recycling of old technologies, giving entrepreneurs an opening to offer recycling services to companies who will pay to dispose of their old equipment. In California, for instance, an Electronic Waste Recycling Fee has been charged to every purchaser of a new computer monitor or TV since July, which will help provide funds to recyclers (both consumers and collectors) when the items are recycled (much like aluminum and glass redemption programs). Other states and federal entities are considering similar programs. Says Goss, “It’s incumbent upon the institutional players–industry, government, retailers, recyclers–to come up with mechanisms that allow the consumer a readily available way to turn in a used [tech] item and know that it’s going to be properly recycled.”Randy and Vera Lewis, husband-and-wife entrepreneurs, got into the game with their business, SoCal Computer Recyclers Inc., in Harbor City, California. Randy originally got interested back in 1998 when his recently purchased computer monitor broke. Not wanting to just throw it away, he researched e-cycling systems and discovered a void in his local community. He started the business that same year. Fast-forward to 2005, when Randy, 36, and Vera, 40, recycle old technology for businesses and consumers. Depending on the condition of the items, the Lewises wipe out the data before selling the equipment to resellers or donating it to nonprofit organizations, or they dismantle the equipment and sell its parts. They project $1.2 million in 2005 sales. Collecting obsolete items at big e-waste recycling events is actually fun for the pair. “I get to see all kinds of stuff–[I think] we’ve got every single piece of equipment from Tron,” jokes Randy.Opportunities abound, from data declassification and donation of usable items to cleaning data from old computers and shipping usable products to less fortunate countries. Though the Lewises don’t have a set plan for their company’s future, they are considering specializing in either data declassification or shipping used computers overseas. Nichole L. Torres This story appears in the October 2005 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » –shares Repurposing Old Tech Equipment Technology Magazine Contributor 3 min read What do you do with old tech equipment? These entrepreneurs give it a whole new life. Apply Now »last_img read more

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Alaska Air CEO Expects Challenge Keeping Virgin Customers After Merger

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first_img Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Add to Queue Reuters Alaska Air Group Inc. expects it will be challenging to keep customers who are loyal to Virgin America Inc. after the two companies merge, Alaska Air’s chief executive said on an analyst call on Thursday.Alaska Air said earlier this month that it would buy Virgin America, a carrier with cult status among leisure and business travelers on the U.S. West Coast, for $2.6 billion.Chief Executive Brad Tilden said “the biggest challenge” ahead will be appealing to its own customers as well as Virgin America’s passengers, after that airline is merged into the Alaska brand. Virgin America has a distinctive style, with in-flight mood-lighting and media-rich entertainment.Shares of Alaska Air were down about 3 percent in afternoon trade.JPMorgan analyst Jamie Baker said on the same call that he had underestimated Virgin America’s following, and asked if Alaska Air expected a spillover from the deal.”We are aware of the value that that company has brought to its customers. Our goal isn’t to lose that,” Tilden said. “Our goal is to gain that as a foothold in the state of California as something that we grow in the decade or two ahead.”Alaska Air has said it might keep using the Virgin America brand in some form.Executives said they still expect regulatory approval of the deal this year, and that they are answering the U.S. Justice Department’s questions about the merger.The company also said it grew adjusted profit 23 percent to $183 million in the first quarter, or $1.45 per share, not including Virgin America’s results. Analysts on average had expected $1.42, according to Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S.(Reporting By Jeffrey Dastin in New York, Editing by Franklin Paul and David Gregorio) 39shares This story originally appeared on Reuters Next Article 2 min readcenter_img Virgin America Image credit: Chris Parypa Photography | Shutterstock.com April 22, 2016 Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Alaska Air CEO Expects Challenge Keeping Virgin Customers After Merger Register Now »last_img read more

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Yahoo to Provide Details on Massive Data Breach

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first_img A Petition Is Coming ? for a ‘Game of Thrones’ Final Season Do-Over Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use DiCaprio, Pitt want to team up again after Tarantino hit Former world paragliding champion Rémy soars over Pyrenees Up Next: Next Article Memorial Day Weekend Heat Wave Could Smash May Records The requested video is no longer available Add to Queue A LifeMinute with Ryan Seacrest Apply Now » Cannes: ticketless festival-goers seek seats for films Cannes: ticketless festival-goers seek seats for films Congress Is Back as President Trump Heads to the UK 2 Musts for Tackling Allergy Season Delicious Summer Entertaining Ideas It was not clear how such a disclosure might affect Yahoo’s plan to sell its email service and other core internet properties to Verizon for $4.8 billion. Sunlight Shines on Grand Canyon Autoplay: On | Off Summer Beauty Survival Must-Haves Saint Laurent dazzles with men’s collection on Malibu beach Beyond Meat Earnings Are Beyond Analyst Expectations Yahoo to Provide Details on Massive Data Breach Figure Out Your Family Tree Just in Time For Father’s Day 2 Musts for Tackling Allergy Season September 22, 2016 Yahoo Inc. will disclose details this week of a data breach that compromised the data of several hundred million users, technology news site Recode reported on Thursday, citing unnamed sources familiar with the company’s plan.Reuters was not able to immediately confirm the report.It was not clear how such a disclosure might affect Yahoo’s plan to sell its email service and other core internet properties to Verizon Communications Inc. for $4.8 billion.Yahoo might have to force users to reset their passwords, the Recode report said, citing unnamed sources.The report follows an Aug. 1 story in the technology news site, Motherboard, that said a cyber criminal known as Peace was selling the data of about 200 million Yahoo users, but did not confirm its authenticity.The Motherboard report was published a week after Verizon announced its deal with Yahoo.Peace was selling that batch of data on the 200 million Yahoo users for 3 bitcoin, or around $1,860, according to Motherboard. The possibly compromised data includes user names, birth dates, some backup email addresses and scrambled passwords, Motherboard said.(Reporting by Jim Finkle in Boston and Aishwarya Venugopal in Bengaluru; Editing by Ted Kerr and Bernadette Baum) 31shares HBO’s ‘Chernobyl’ Phenomenon Sophie Turner Talks Dark Phoenix, Co-Star Jessica Chastain and GoT New York takes aim at skyscrapers’ sky-high energy usage A LifeMinute with John Lithgow: The Actor Discusses His Latest Projects Turning Up the Heat in the Southeast for Holiday Weekend 2 Delicious Summer Entertaining Ideas A Petition Is Coming ? for a ‘Game of Thrones’ Final Season Do-Over Reuters North Carolina superintendent says new app can help reduce violence in schools 2020 Ballots May Have a New Box to Check ? Vice President Photo of solider placing flag at Tomb of Unknown Solider goes viral IndyCar Beefing Up Business as Indy 500 Approaches Figure Out Your Family Tree Just in Time For Father’s Day 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List How Human Behavior is Hurting Animals and What We Can Do to Protect Them Yahoo! Figure Out Your Family Tree Just in Time For Father’s Day Father’s Day is such a special moment for the whole family to come together and spend quality time with one another – and those are moments dad will cherish. What better way for dad to connect with his loved ones than learning about his family’s stor Lifeminute tv Embed Justin Bieber Launches Plant-Based Deodorant Figure Out Your Family Tree Just in Time For Father’s Day A Safe Way to Get Rid Of Bugs in Your Home Sophie Turner Talks Dark Phoenix, Co-Star Jessica Chastain and GoT Figure Out Your Family Tree Just in Time For Father’s Day Summer Beauty Survival Must-Haves Albany Steps Closer to Releasing Trump’s State Tax Returns After Assembly Vote The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Economy adds 75K jobs in May Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Guitarist Don ‘Fingers’ Felder Releases New Album 2020 Toyota Camry Swimwear Styles for All Shapes and Sizes Airbnb Wants to Take You on an All-Inclusive Adventure Southern Charm’ Star Talks New Season Airbnb Wants to Take You on an All-Inclusive Adventure US Navy: Russian destroyer almost collided with cruiser in the Philippine Sea Memorial Day Weekend Heat Wave Could Smash May Records Heat Snapshot This story originally appeared on Reuters 1 min read Economy adds 75K jobs in May BACK IHOP Sees Explosive Growth in To-Go Sales Summer is here and there are some great looks this season for women of all shapes and sizes. Check out the hottest styles for hourglass, rectangle and pear shaped women. A Safe Way to Get Rid Of Bugs in Your Homelast_img read more

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Recommendations Are the New Dashboards

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first_imgWith the growth of Business Intelligence (BI) and Analytics, dashboards are now pervasive and considered commonplace in the modern enterprise. We see them visualizing information for every type of organization, across every industry. They are embedded in websites, and they even (on occasion) make cameos in movies. Despite its ubiquity, the day of the dashboard as a static, stand-alone technology is quickly coming to an end. On the continuum between minds and machines, they are overly reliant on human inputs and are constrained by such elements. Yesterday’s dashboards are being upgraded with Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning algorithms that transform them into dynamic tools—they are now able to use AI-powered recommendations to ensure that the intelligence being delivered to users across the entire enterprise is both relevant and actionable.Read More: GDPR Compliance: Decoding The Mood A Year LaterRecommendations Are Already PervasiveRecommendations are already pervasive in our everyday lives—impacting everything from the way we select a movie to what gadgets we buy online. Netflix uses a complex Machine Learning algorithm to recommend new shows and movies based on user demographics and previously watched content. Travel apps like Hopper and Travelocity recommend the best time to purchase flights for the lowest fare. And the global leader in retail, Amazon, has integrated recommendations into nearly every aspect of the purchasing process. These types of recommendations work to personalize the consumer experience—improving engagement levels and boosting loyalty.As this type of recommendation becomes more and more common, businesses are adopting AI-driven recommendations internally, too. For example, NBC uses algorithms to recommend not only which ads to show customers, but where to place them on a webpage. Another example of this type of enterprise recommendation is IBM’s Watson Marketing, which can use consumer demographic and social behavior data to recommend customer outreach programs for marketing departments.Read More: Navigating GDPR: Preparing for What’s to ComeRecommendations in BI?Aside from Machine Learning applications, what can recommendations do for the BI and Analytics industry? For starters, it can speed up the process of finding insights and make creating dashboards and charts more accessible to every business user in an organization—even those without particular data skillsets. For example, recommendations implemented in a dashboard could immediately analyze the data and suggest suitable charts for visualizing important KPIs, all with zero clicks.Natural language processing (NLP) can also be used to create recommendations. With Natural Language querying, users can ask questions about their data in dossiers and receive answers in the form of new visualizations. Analysts can also quickly gain insights through dossier recommendations, which suggest dossiers authored by other users within an organization who have used similar metrics and attributes in their dashboards.Building on the momentum achieved so far, AI-powered improvements will only continue to revolutionize dashboarding and BI.Read More: Key Social Media Monetization Tactics for Mobile-First Gaming Brands AIanalyticsBusiness IntelligenceNetflixNew DashboardsNLP Previous ArticleCoSchedule Launches Marketing Suite to Transform the Way Marketers WorkNext ArticleSpotX and Mediaocean Announce Integration Giving TV Buyers Direct Pipeline to Premium Video Supply Recommendations Are the New Dashboards Hugh OwenJune 25, 2019, 9:00 amJune 21, 2019 last_img read more

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Lifestyle interventions may delay onset of Type 2 diabetes in patients with

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first_img Source:https://osteopathic.org/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 30 2018Lifestyle interventions, medication and surgery for patients diagnosed with pre-diabetes is proven to delay or prevent Type 2 diabetes in the majority of patients, but limited access to the often expensive treatments is fueling rising rates of the disease, according to research in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.Currently, one in three American adults has prediabetes and more than 70% of adults are overweight or obese. Evidence shows lifestyle interventions, medication or surgery that results in weight loss effective prevents or delays the onset of Type 2 diabetes for as many as 70% of patients with prediabetes, said researcher Jay Shubrook, DO, who specializes in the treatment of diabetes.Related StoriesDiabetes patients experiencing empathy from PCPs have beneficial long-term clinical outcomesNew biomaterial could encapsulate and protect implanted insulin-producing cellsDiabetes medications mask euglycemic ketoacidosis at the time of surgery”We know that it’s much more cost effective to prevent disease than to treat it, particularly when it comes to diabetes. The short-term focus on immediate costs means patients are missing out on the opportunity to keep their disease from progressing. It’s a false economy and if nothing changes, a third of Americans are expected to have diabetes by 2050,” Dr. Shubrook explained.Evidence-based interventionsCommon lifestyle interventions focus on nutrition and increasing physical activity to promote weight loss. Most prioritize offering a supportive group environment to help participants achieve their goals, typically a mean weight loss of 7%. In a 3,200 participant study, lifestyle intervention reduced the incidence of type 2 diabetes by 58% in patients with prediabetes. A 10-year follow up reported a 34% decrease in the incidence of diabetes for the original study participants. The results and projected cost savings were so impressive that the Diabetes Prevention Program is now a mandated benefit for people with prediabetes who have Medicare.The prescription medication metformin and other drug interventions were somewhat less effective than lifestyle changes, but also resulted in preventing or delaying the onset of diabetes. Metabolic, or weight-loss, surgery was more effective than lifestyle interventions at preventing diabetes onset and had longer lasting benefits, with a relative risk reduction of 78%.”Weight loss is a central treatment target for most chronic diseases because the benefit is spread across numerous conditions,” Dr. Shubrook noted. “We have the tools to change the trajectory for millions of patients at risk for diabetes. Using them wisely will save not only money, but lives, in the long run.”last_img read more

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Understanding healing role for kidneyresident macrophages may help treat acute kidney injury

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first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 25 2019During development in the womb, immune cells called macrophages go to the kidneys, and they remain there for life. Understanding the possible healing role for these macrophages after kidney damage may be crucial to helping treat patients who suffer acute kidney injury.Acute kidney injury, or AKI, is a devastating condition that develops in two-thirds of critically ill patients, and patients with AKI have a 60 percent risk of dying. In AKI, kidneys can become scarred and can show progressive decline in function, becoming unable to heal their tissue.In a JCI Insight study published today, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have found that, during AKI in a mouse model, the kidney-resident macrophages are reprogrammed to a developmental state, resembling these same cells when they are found in newborn mice. Newborn mouse kidneys are still developing. This reprogramming during AKI may be important to promote healing and tissue regeneration. If a similar developmental shift is seen for human kidney-resident macrophages during AKI, that could aid new therapeutic approaches for patients.The experimental challenge in this study was distinguishing the kidney-resident macrophages from the many cells that invade the kidney from blood circulation in response to kidney damage. Some of these invading cell types can differentiate into macrophages and dendritic cells in the kidney, and it was unknown whether some of the invaders become kidney-resident macrophages.The UAB researchers used parabiosis — the linking of the blood circulatory systems between two mice — to reveal whether the kidney-resident macrophages after AKI were from invading precursors or from renewal by existing kidney-resident macrophages in the kidney.In the parabiosis experiments, two mice shared blood circulation for four weeks, and then one underwent ischemia/reperfusion-induced AKI. Because the immune cells of the two mice have different surface markers that identify which mouse they come from, researchers could follow the invasion of the AKI kidneys by circulating immune cells from the healthy mouse. They found that the infiltrating cells contributed only minimally to the kidney-resident macrophage cell pool in the damaged kidneys.Thus, after kidney injury, the kidney-resident macrophages are a distinct cellular subpopulation that does not differentiate from nonresident, infiltrating, precursor immune cells.Researchers, led by co-senior authors Anupam Agarwal, M.D., director of the Division of Nephrology in the UAB Department of Medicine, and James George, Ph.D., professor in the UAB Department of Surgery, detailed how the kidney-resident macrophages are reprogrammed to a developmental state after injury. In response to the disease model, the kidney-resident macrophages turned off their expression of major histocompatibility complex type II, or MHCII. This lack of expression is similar to kidney-resident macrophages in newborn mice — those mice, the researchers showed, lack expression of this protein up to postnatal day seven, and then begin to express it over the next two weeks. Notably, MHCII protein and macrophages have important roles in autoimmunity and transplant rejection.Related StoriesCommon metric may not accurately assess kidney function of Indian patientsChronic kidney disease patients are excluded from clinical trialsResearchers investigate whether hypertension poses health risk to older kidney donorsIn addition, kidney-resident macrophages after AKI underwent transcriptional reprogramming to express a gene profile closely resembling that of the kidney-resident macrophages in newborn mice at postnatal day seven. Further supporting their role in development and healing, the reprogrammed kidney-resident macrophages were enriched in Wnt signaling, an active pathway that is vital for mouse and human kidney development.Co-first authors of the JCI Insight study, “Resident macrophages reprogram toward a developmental state after acute kidney injury,” are Jeremie M. Lever and Travis D. Hull, M.D., Ph.D., who are trainees from the NIH-funded UAB Medical Scientist Training Program, an M.D., Ph.D. program.”Macrophage biology has reached a pivotal point,” said Lever, a UAB graduate student and NIH F31 individual fellow. Many basic science research studies have suggested the importance for tissue-resident macrophages in healing after injury, but development of therapies promoting them is still in early stages, Lever says. “In order to successfully utilize these cells for contemporary translational interventions, I believe we will need to be specific about the origin — tissue-resident versus infiltrative — of the cells we plan to target.”Hull, now a surgery resident at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, said, “This work demonstrates that tissue resident macrophages possess the same plasticity that has been demonstrated in other immunological cell types. Moreover, this ability to reprogram to an early ontological phenotype is a potential avenue for therapeutic intervention, if the cellular signals and mechanisms of this reprogramming can be fully elucidated.”This is an exciting development in the field of acute kidney injury,” Hull said, “but also may represent a therapeutic target in fields such as transplantation, where the importance of macrophage biology is less well understood.” Source:https://www.uab.edu/news/research/item/10114-kidney-resident-macrophages-a-role-for-healing-during-acute-kidney-injurylast_img read more

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Heres why the Uber Lyft protests might not even work

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first_imgA loose network of ride-hailing drivers took to the streets without their cars from San Diego to Atlanta on Wednesday as they protested ahead of Uber’s highly anticipated initial public offering, which is scheduled for Friday. Credit: CC0 Public Domain “It’s one thing to have a barbecue, it’s another thing to set up a rally or to really encourage people to protest.”Also, not everyone is dissatisfied with their jobs.Scott Steinbrink, 51, said that he’s not protesting because he’s happy with how much he makes driving for Lyft and he prefers the flexible schedule.”I enjoy my work. I enjoy driving. So I don’t have any complaint,” said Steinbrink, who resides in Atlanta. “We’re not employees of Uber and Lyft. We’re contractors. We decide our hours, not them. So I disagree with the protest entirely.”RIDERSThere’s no doubt that passengers drive the demand for convenient rides.Ninety-five million people use the Uber app on a monthly basis. So while organizers urge riders to put down the app, many commuters have grown to depend on services like Uber and Lyft.Unlike factory work where a relatively small number of people could halt a company’s output, a few drivers taking the day off hardly disadvantages commuters in competitive cities, Rojas says.”If you have tens of thousands of drivers in the area, even if a thousand got together to protest, the other 9,000 or so will still be driving,” Rojas said.”And another 9,000 may not even know a protest is going on. But in a factory, you’ll know if something is happening at work.”ORGANIZERSConvincing people that their attendance matters is one of the biggest hurdles organizers of protests face, Rojas said.”No one wants to be the one guy out there in front of the Uber office with the picket sign,” he said.In a digital age, organizers also have to contend with people feeling as though liking a tweet or donating $1 to a cause from their homes is enough to create change.Rojas used the term “slacktivism” to describe the type of protests that are easy to do but don’t require much action. “That isn’t the kind of thing that’s going to change very much.”And it’s still unclear what outcome is even possible.As self-employed contractors, drivers don’t have a legal right to form labor unions and negotiate contracts. By classifying workers as independent contractors instead of employees, Uber isn’t required to pay certain taxes or provide benefits, overtime, or minimum wages to many drivers.Perhaps organizers and drivers are protesting to get the attention of legislators who can take action by raising wages, capping commissions and forcing ride-share apps to be more transparent.Will it work? Only time will tell.Uber was somewhat prepared for the strikes.Uber said in its filings that it expects “driver dissatisfaction will generally increase,” as the company reduces driver incentives to improve financial performance.”This gig economy is new. It literally didn’t exist in 2005. So nobody knows how to do effective protests in that way yet,” Rojas said. “How would Uber drivers change their working conditions? Nobody really knows yet.” Explore further Citation: Here’s why the Uber, Lyft protests might not even work (2019, May 9) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-uber-lyft-protests.html Uber, Lyft drivers protest across the US, overseas (c)2019 USA TodayDistributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. In Los Angeles, about two dozen protesters took time off work to gather in the early morning at LAX. Meanwhile, tons of working Uber and Lyft drivers dropped passengers off at the airport. In Long Island City, Queens, a lone protester held a sign that read “Uber, Lyft, Juno, Via drivers on strike” as several ride-sharing cars swarmed the area to pick up commuters requesting rides.Five days in advance, organizers urged drivers to abstain from using ride-hailing apps for durations ranging from two hours to a whole day. The action was poised to put a dent in Uber’s biggest markets across the globe, organizers said.Uber told USA TODAY there was no noticeable impact in their daily operations.Only about a dozen drivers showed up to a rally in New York City’s Financial District Friday morning, and according to local news outlets in Boston, it was a normal day at the airport for travelers trying to hitch a ride using an app. Though later in the day, drivers and protesters blocked traffic on Market Street in front of Uber’s San Francisco headquarters.So what happened?It’s hard to tell exactly.Experts say that everything from a disconnected workforce to disinterested drivers can be to blame. Not to mention, not everyone can take time off during peak driving hours to protest a job that their livelihood relies on.DRIVERSA wide range of people work for ride-share companies including college students looking to make extra money between classes and chauffeurs who support their families using the optional tips you leave at the end of your trip.That diverse and disjointed workforce might work against organizers who are hoping for big turnouts.”Some drivers will be deeply invested, and others may say ‘I don’t care about that,'” said Fabio Rojas, a professor of sociology at Indiana University who has written books on social movements. “There’s a lot of natural variation that could keep a protest from getting off the ground.”Unlike workers who share an office space, ride-hailing drivers typically don’t have to interact with one another. While they may have coordinated social meetups, “those groups aren’t really built for politics,” Rojas said. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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