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The 5 Takeaways from the Coyotes introduction of

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first_img The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo “They were both about the same field goal-wise, the kickoffs obviously were a huge difference, although Jay had really improved his,” Cardinals coach Bruce Arians said when asked of the decision. “I just liked the strength of his leg for a young guy. He has a very good demeanor about him.”The average distance traveled on Catanzaro’s kickoffs was 69.3 yards, while Feely was booting them a full 70 yards down the field. However, the average return on the veteran’s kickoffs was more than 3.5 yards higher than those on the rookie’s. Whatever the reasons, the Cardinals made the decision to go with the former Clemson Tiger who connected on 67-of-82 field goal attempts in college while finishing as the second leading scorer in ACC history. “I called my parents, everybody, my whole family is really ecstatic, as well as me,” he said when asked what he did upon hearing the news. “I teared up a little bit. It’s just a life-long dream coming true for me. “From here on out I know I’ve got to earn my right to be here, but for now I’m celebrating a little bit. I’m really excited about it.”And that’s just it for the 23-year-old. Just because he earned the job in training camp does not mean he is guaranteed to keep it for the duration of the season. Plenty of young kickers have come and go, with very few being good enough and consistent enough to last in the league. Think about it: There’s a reason so many kickers play well into their late 30s and some even into their 40s. Interestingly enough, the question mark facing Catanzaro entering camp was his ability to handle kickoffs. While in college, Catanzaro was left to watch as punter Bradley Pinion handled kickoffs, leaving him left to prove to NFL teams he could do a job that, quite frankly, is rarely a question mark when it comes to young kickers. “It’s another thing people kind of doubted me on,” he said. “I was really excited to get working after the year was over, after the Orange Bowl at Clemson, to work on the kickoff leg. I knew that was kind of my knock coming out, and I just worked my tail off.”Catanzaro said he worked with former NFL kickers Morten Andersen, Dan Orner and Jamie Kohl over the offseason, always believing he could successfully handle kickoffs but knowing he needed get some reps in doing it.“I’m very excited about where my kickoffs are right now; I’m very confident,” he said.Thursday’s preseason finale against the Chargers will be Catanzaro’s first game as the kicker, and he said he’s looking forward to going out and solidifying himself in that role. Top Stories TEMPE, Ariz. — That the Arizona Cardinals decided to go with rookie Chandler Catanzaro over 14-year NFL veteran Jay Feely was not an upset. Catanzaro, after all, has a stronger leg than Feely, had been perfect on his field goal and extra point attempts in the preseason, and had consistently put the ball in the back of the end zone on kickoff attempts.Still, when news came down that the team had decided to place its trust in a rookie, some people wondered if the Cardinals were making the right decision. Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Besides, it’s not as if having to try and win a job from an established NFL veteran does not come with its own kind of pressure.“Now I can just kind of focus on being the best me I can be,” Catanzaro said. “I’m not really focused on competing against anybody else anymore. I’m competing against myself and trying to get better each day so I can help this team win games this year.“I’m excited about it.” 0 Comments   Share   Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires “I know from here on out that I have to earn my right to play every day, so I’m willing to work as hard as I ever have to keep this job and earn the right to be here,” he said. That will mean forcing touchbacks and converting on field goal and PAT attempts, some of which will likely occur late in close games. As a rookie he has no track record of making clutch kicks in the NFL, which is why some people are skeptical of the decision to part with Feely, who has made 11 game-winning field goals in his career — including six with the Cardinals.But that risk is of no concern to the coach who made the decision to go with the rookie.“Every position, they’re all the same,” he said. “You either can or you can’t.”Catanzaro said when he’s on the field he is able to block out factors like crowd size and noise, letting himself “get in a zone” where he can block everything else out. He also said experience won’t be an issue because of how much he kicked in college, and added the difference in pressure between then and now won’t be a factor.“Pressure’s pressure,” he said. “I don’t really think of it as pressure. I just take every kick and just zone in and do the best I can do.” Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more

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Rep Kahle bill to attract skilled trade teachers signed into law

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first_img Categories: Kahle News,News 27Jun Rep. Kahle bill to attract skilled trade teachers signed into law State Rep. Bronna Kahle today announced her legislation to expand professional trade and career-oriented instruction has been signed into law.Kahle’s new law, as a part of a four-bill bipartisan measure, will permit schools to hire skilled trade instructors to teach career technical education classes tied to their professional expertise where they have a license or certificate.“Good teachers have a tremendous impact on their students,” said Kahle, of Adrian. “We need to open the door to experienced skilled trade professionals to share their experience in our classrooms. These courses are growing in demand, so local districts should have the flexibility to make the call on who teaches their own students and helps build their future.”Mark Haag, superintendent of the Lenawee Intermediate School District; Dan Garno, executive director of Staff Resources at the Lenawee ISD; and Dan Rogers, director of Center for Science and Industry in Hudson all joined Kahle in Lansing to testify in support of the Career Pathway bills.In addition, the new laws will:Create a K-12 model program that emphasizes career learning and themes for each grade level, while focusing on engaging with parents, community businesses and industry interests;Provide continuing education and professional development credit for teachers who spend time engaging with local employers and professional trade centers.The Michigan Career Pathways Alliance, which includes state K-12 education and employment leaders working together to help strengthen Michigan’s future, also played a key role in developing and advancing the new plan.“There are good-paying jobs and bright careers available in Lenawee County in the professional trades, and skilled professionals can help build Michigan’s future to meet the growing need,” said Kahle, of Adrian. “Providing young people with more opportunities to get this kind of specialized instruction will help expand their education and career options, while adding practical real-world instruction and training.”House Bill 5141 is now Public Act 235 of 2018.#####last_img read more

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By Chris Wood Senior Analyst We know that we and

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first_imgBy Chris Wood, Senior AnalystWe know that we (and all living systems) inherit our genetic traits through a naturally occurring information storage system known as deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA. DNA consists of a linear sequence of the chemical bases adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine (denoted by the symbols A, C, G, and T), attached to a repeating linear chain made up of alternating sugar and phosphate segments and bound together with hydrogen bonds in a double helix to complementary bases. The “A” of one strand always forms a base pair with the “T” of the other strand, and “C” always forms a base pair with “G.”Our molecular blueprint for life, the haploid human genome, comprises approximately three billion DNA base pairs, divided into 23 pairs of chromosomes ranging in size from about 50 million to 250 million bases. Contained within these chromosomes are approximately 23,000 smaller regions, called genes, each one containing the recipe for a protein or group of related proteins that are produced in a linear, step-by-step process.First (and we’ve simplified things here), in transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase converts the DNA strand base for base into messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA has the same sequence as the DNA, except that thymine (T) is replaced with uracil (U). The mRNA then carries the information out of the cell nucleus into the cytoplasm for the second step in protein production, called translation.Once in the cytoplasm, the mRNA interacts with a specialized complex called a ribosome, which “reads” the sequence of mRNA bases and translates them into proteins. These proteins go on to play key roles in the structure and function of all cells, including the regulation and execution of subsequent transcription and translation.This flow of information from DNA to RNA to proteins is one of the fundamental principles of molecular biology – so important that it is sometimes called the “central dogma.”The important takeaway for our purposes is that DNA itself is trapped in the cell nucleus. It’s RNA’s job to get the information out of the nucleus and into the cytoplasm, transforming you from a chemical recipe to a real living, breathing human. Because of RNA we can build proteins. We are made of proteins. In other words, RNA builds life. And that’s big.But there is something else amazing about RNA that could revolutionize how doctors treat many (if not most) chronic human diseases. And nobody knew about it until just a few years ago.Back in 1986, a geneticist named Rich Jorgensen was working at a small biotech startup in California. He was tasked with creating a spectacular new flower, to help attract venture capital funding for the company. His plan was to create a very, very purple petunia. So he inserted an extra copy of the purple-producing gene into the plant’s DNA. But instead of producing purple, Jorgensen’s petunia instead bloomed with white flowers, the complete opposite of what the scientist expected. Inserting the extra purple-producing gene had resulted in the flowers completely losing their pigmentation. This was a big puzzle. And it took another decade of scientific research (and countless experiments with flowers, fruit flies, worms, and other organisms) to figure out what was going on.Completely by accident, Jorgensen had stumbled upon an ancient secret inside living cells – a process that cells use to turn down, or silence, the activity of specific genes. This process is now known as RNA interference, or RNAi.RNAi is thought to have evolved about a billion years ago, as a cellular defense mechanism against invaders such as RNA viruses and to combat the spread of harmful, mutation-causing genetic elements called transposons, within a cell’s DNA. It works by destroying the messenger (mRNAs) carrying genetic information to the cell’s protein factories. By killing the mRNAs and not allowing the protein specified by that gene to be made, the gene is rendered essentially inactive.When Jorgensen inserted the extra purple-producing gene into the petunia’s DNA, it triggered the cell’s RNAi to silence all the purple-producing genes because the cell thought the recipe for the protein looked fishy. Exactly why the cell thought this is a bit too complex to go into here. But in very simple terms, the instructions Jorgensen inserted to make more purple happened to have a suspicious viral shape.What’s important is that with RNAi, scientists had discovered a way to effectively silence genes one at a time (by shutting down the protein-building process), just based on knowing their sequence. Since many, if not most, chronic human diseases result from inappropriate protein production or improper protein activity, the implications for the treatment of disease were profound. Cancer, HIV and other infectious diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases – all became theoretical fair game for treatment with RNAi therapeutics.And so, not too long after the discovery of RNAi in 1998 – by Craig Mello and Andrew Fire (who were awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for the discovery) – came the hype. Drugs based on RNAi were said to be the next major class of human therapeutics. Big pharma and small biotech firms alike pumped a flood of money into RNAi-based drug development.The boom phase in RNAi got rolling in 2005 and lasted through about 2008. During that time we saw a bidding war break out for access to potentially gate-keeping RNAi intellectual property and several billion dollars in investments in the space by big pharma. Merck paid $1.1 billion to acquire Sirna Therapeutics, and Roche paid more than $300 million for a limited platform license from Alnylam (arguably the global leader when it comes to RNAi IP). The industry loved the attention, and the media fanned the flames. Consequently, unrealistic expectations set in, and investors fell prey to the mistaken notion that the technical barriers to exploiting RNAi in medicine were relatively low.The industry was in for a wake-up call, however, when the difficulty surrounding RNAi drug delivery came to light. The drugs (comprised of what’s called small interfering RNA, or “siRNA”) break down quickly in the bloodstream; and even if they reach the cells in the body where they are needed, they have trouble entering the cells. Once the mistake of putting IP ahead of enablement was recognized a backlash ensued, and there was a severe crisis of confidence in the potential of RNAi thereapeutics. Novartis ended its five-year partnership with Alnylam in September 2010. Shortly thereafter, Roche, one of the world’s biggest spenders on drug R&D, terminated its RNAi program altogether. Stock prices of companies operating in the space plummeted.Just recently, however, we’ve started to see a comeback in RNAi. The recovery is based not on hype, but on sound science and clinical successes, which should pique investors’ interest. Technical hurdles remain but are being overcome, and companies are advancing drug candidates in the clinic. Alnylam, for example, now has four RNAi drugs in clinical trials and is on pace to have five RNAi therapeutic programs in advanced clinical development by 2015. Together with collaborators at MIT, the company also recently announced the discovery of “core-shell” nanoparticles that have optimal chemical and physical properties for effective, systemic intracellular delivery of RNAi therapeutics. The findings were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. And Alnylam is by no means the only one making advances in the RNAi space.Earlier this year, scientists from MIT, led by Paula Hammond, came up with a novel delivery vehicle in which RNA is packed into microspheres so dense that they withstand degradation until they reach their target. The new system, which was described in the journal Nature Materials in late February, supposedly knocks down expression of specific genes as effectively as existing delivery methods, but with a much smaller dose of particles.Whether RNAi therapeutics can ever live up to the hype they experienced in the early 2000s remains highly uncertain. Perhaps the technical hurdles will ultimately be too much to overcome. Or perhaps a new technology will come along that renders the therapeutics obsolete before they ever make it out of the clinic. [Ed Note: Researchers from the University of Florida have recently created what they call nanozymes, which is a new type of nanoparticle conjugate that mimics RNAi.]Nevertheless, RNAi has the potential to usher in a new order of medicine, the likes of which we’ve only rarely seen. And while investing in the space is highly speculative and requires a lot of due diligence, there is the potential for uncovering a stock that returns several times your initial investment. Good hunting. Bits & BytesHacking Your Hand (Technology Review)Generally speaking, we like to devise things that become extensions of our physical faculties. With hands, we’ve come up with everything from baseball bats to martini glasses to robot surgical machines. But what do we think of a human hand as becoming an extension of a machine? That may not seem like it has any practical applications, like hitting a home run or performing a double bypass. Still, it hasn’t stopped the Japanese from inventing the “PossessedHand,” an apparatus that can actually control your hand for you. What this might say about the creator’s psyche is perhaps best left unexplored.Gmail Mining (Fox News)Do you want Google to play dumpster diver, pawing through your Gmail, looking for commercial tie-ins? Well, as of yesterday, that’s a choice being offered to a million Gmail users (out of 425 million accounts). The bridge Google has constructed between its search engine and email service will mine the correspondence stored within a user’s Gmail account for any data tied to a search request. If that’s too creepy, rest assured that this feature is opt-in only. For now, anyway.How to Land on Mars (SlashGear)The landing of the large exploration vehicle Curiosity on Mars was a grand technological achievement. The article at the link, actually written before touchdown, explains how it would be accomplished. Lots of links, graphics, video. Call it Martian Invasion 101…Facebook Expands Advertising for Mobile (Tech Crunch)Until now, every Facebook mobile ad had to be triggered by your or a friend’s activity, but as of Tuesday Facebook began testing a new non-social ad unit that lets developers buy mobile news-feed ads that open Android and iOS App Store purchase pages when clicked. It’s a move aimed at persuading investors that it’s moving forward with new monetization ideas, but the company will have to tread very carefully to avoid alienating users.last_img read more

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Dear Reader If you hosted a barbeque this past La

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first_imgDear Reader,If you hosted a barbeque this past Labor Day weekend, you probably noticed that food prices are up. A hamburger costs 10.3% more than last year, and a hotdog 6.9% more.But that’s nothing compared to the insane price inflation Casey Research Chief Economist Bud Conrad witnessed at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, a world-famous auto show and auction held in Monterey, California.Below, Bud shares the details of his trip to Monterey, complete with photos and price tags of the most extravagant cars… including this 1963 Ferrari GTO that smashed the record for the most expensive car ever sold at auction. See if you can guess what it sold for before reading:Bud closes by analyzing what this extreme inflation in high-end assets means for investors.Enjoy!Dan SteinhartManaging Editor of The Casey Reportlast_img read more

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In This Issue Dollar recovers losses after FM

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first_imgIn This Issue. * Dollar recovers losses after FMM. * Cyclone hits Australia. * Oil trades in a tight range. * Connection problems for Chuck! And Now. Today’s A Pfennig For Your Thoughts. Greece Makes Its Proposal . Good Day!…And a Happy Friday to one and all! This was a holiday-shortened week, but it still seemed quite long to me, as I kept thinking all day yesterday that it was Friday.. UGH!  The new Polar Vortex has come south.. Can you believe that? Sure it will only last a day, and we’ll have temperatures back to normal in a couple of days, but for today. Well, this is not the weather I signed up for! Oh, quit your complaining, Chuck, back home in St. Louis this stuff goes on and on and on, until you’re at wit’s end.  And besides. It’s a Friday! Time to get everything finished, and get to work on a weekend! I’m experiencing wireless/ internet problems this morning, so this letter may or may not go out on time. UGH!  I guess the shoddy ISP service we get here, can’t stand the cold. The Great George Harrison greets me this morning with his song: While My Guitar Gently Weeps. George Harrison was a very talented guitar player and writer of music. One of my faves.  OK. well, with the internet down, I’m using my iPhone to get news. Gee, that’s fun. NOT!  But from what I can tell the dollar has the conn again, and has recovered all that it lost right after the Fed Meeting Minutes (FMM) on Wednesday. Apparently, it was not enough to get their heads handed to them when they read that the Fed Members were not “all-in” on a rate hike for June, so just wait when we get to June and these same guys get left at the rate hike alter. At least that’s the scenario I’m sticking with, for the economic data continues to disappoint, and print negative in most cases, proving that the economy is not ready for prime time.  And next week we may get a clearer picture of the Fed’s plans, as Fed Chairwoman, Janet Yellen will make the trek up the Hill and give her testimony on the economy to lawmakers. This will be repeated the following day to the other side of the legislation, first the Senate, then the House. I would think that given what we already know from the FMM, that it has a very recognizable dovish slant, that Yellen will do her best to keep everyone guessing. I think she prefers that guessing game with the markets. But we have that looming on the docket for next week. So. Greece made their proposal to receive an extension of 6 months to their original agreement that is to end on the last day of this month.   And as expected Germany lashed out at the proposal. So, that wrangling over a proposal didn’t do the euro any big favors, heading into the weekend. The Eurozone flash PMI’s are printing this morning. Another problem for the euro I do believe, so the euro is trying to do the heavy lifting, and it’s just not working out in the euro’s favor today. And the Swedish krona is getting whacked this morning, as it seems the Riksbank didn’t just like seeing the krona get whacked when they announced negative rates, and sat back to watch the krona drop. Then after sufficiently waiting, the announced the implementation of QE, and sat back again to watch the krona drop more. A couple of days passed, and the krone was attempting to gather some momentum, when the Riksbank decided to give the krona one more shot! Overnight, the Riksbank told the markets that they aren’t finished cutting rates, and then reminded the markets that they don’t have to wait for a scheduled meeting to make a rate cut. Well, needless to say, that pulled the rug from under the krona. And unfortunately, for the Norwegian krone, it’s getting dragged through the mud too. So. my iPhone is a hotspot, which means I should be able to connect to my phone’s wireless server. But. my stupid laptop won’t do that. (I do recall when I was last here in October, telling our IT guys that I had this problem, but then I forgot about it.. until now!) The good news is that my iPad will. but I’m not going to attempt to type out a letter on an iPad. So. I can get some data, not all, but some, and some news but other than that, I’m flying in the dark here. UGH!  The things I must go through. I ask that question to myself or anyone that’s listening all the time.. Why must things be so difficult for me? Ahhh, questions that go unanswered. the stuff that keeps us trying to figure this all out, eh? The Aussie dollar (A$) is flat this morning, so no new negativity toward the A$ overnight. We need to keep our friends in Australia in our thoughts today, as they had Cyclone Marcia hit shore in Queensland overnight. It was a Category 4 going on 5 when it hit. YIKES!   And right behind that cyclone is another. So, things could be getting quite hairy down in Australia. I hope everyone is safe. Alrighty then! We have house guests here and it was a sleepover. and Larry, our guest, had a hotspot that worked on my laptop! YAHOO! I’m back in the saddle again, our where a friend is a friend. the old cowboy.. Gene Autry..  So. here’s the skinny. everything is as I told you above, but the Eurozone flash PMI’s were actually better than expected, but that’s  really not the focus of the markets today. Their focus is all about the Greece situation. And it finally appears to be weighing down the euro. The price of Oil bumped up a buck overnight, so it seems to be in a very tight range, and the petrol currencies bump and grind along with the tight moves. The Russian ruble is a little weaker this morning, but. it appears it will end the week with a weekly gain, the third week in row that the ruble has done that. Interest rates are still very high in Russia, and the currency has responded well to the news of a peace agreement. Maybe, just maybe, cause we never know for sure, but maybe the ruble has turned the corner?  Like I said, we just don’t know. I heard a speaker on the TV yesterday on a business newscast talking emphatically about how the currency pegs that are in place are in no danger of being broken. Hmmm. Isn’t that like a sports team owner given the “vote of confidence’ to his manager, that soon finds out that he’s fired?  I think so. But, we’ll have to wait-n-see how this all plays out, eh? And Gold sure got whacked again yesterday. UGH!  I see that Gold futures are attempting to rebound, but with the pressure that the short paper trades put on Gold, this is getting to be a very difficult thing to live with for me that is.  I see that Germany has repatriated more of its Gold. Good for them!  One thing that I keep focusing on is that the Central Banks (except here in the West) are accumulating Gold, and calling it back so they hold it. There’s smoke there folks. and you know what I always say about how where there’s smoke, there’s fire.  I don’t know what it is these Central Banks are doing, but to me they just keep giving us a warning signal after warning signal. And they’re doing it right out in the open, so everyone can see! The U.S. Data Cupboard is lacking any beef today. the Markit PMI will print. I would look for a grinding down of the index number which last month was 53.9.  Yesterday, the Leading Index number fell from the previous month, but the Initial Jobless Claims were better.. Last week the print for claims rose 25,000 and this week it fell 23,000. So, basically, it’s flat for February. What’s so good about that? Well.. it’s time to go to the Big Finish. I know this isn’t my best effort today, but I really did what I could with what I had at the time. For What’s It’s Worth. Well, since I’m running so far behind in time this morning, I cheated and just went to Ed Steer’s letter to find this. the whole article can be read here: http://sputniknews.com/business/20150213/1018240631.html “Almost 91 domestic credit institutions have been incorporated into the new Russian financial system, the analogous of SWIFT, an international banking network. The new service, will allow Russian banks to communicate seamlessly through the Central Bank of Russia. It should be noted that Russia’s Central Bank initiated the development of the country’s own messaging system in response to repeated threats voiced by Moscow’s Western partners to disconnect Russia from SWIFT. Chuck again. yes, I talked about this a few months ago, and how the Russians were going about getting around the U.S. blocking their ability to use SWIFT.  It’s all a part of the de-dollarization Almost 91 domestic credit institutions have been incorporated into the new Russian financial system, the analogous of SWIFT, an international banking network. The new service, will allow Russian banks to communicate seamlessly through the Central Bank of Russia. It should be noted that Russia’s Central Bank initiated the development of the country’s own messaging system in response to repeated threats voiced by Moscow’s Western partners to disconnect Russia from SWIFT. Chuck again.. yes, I talked about this a few months ago, about how Russia was going to get around the U.S. blocking Russia’s ability to use SWIFT. It’s all about their de-dollarization that’s been going on, folks. To recap. Chuck’s internet connection is down and he’s flying in the dark. Germany balks at Greece’s proposal to extend the current agreement 6 months. and it weighs on the euro. Eurozone flash PMI’s print better than expected. Oil trades in a tight range, and the ruble ends the week with 3 weeks gained. Gold got whacked again, and Russia starts its own SWIFT system. Currencies today 2/20/15. American Style: A$ .7850, kiwi .7555, C$ .8030, euro 1.1305, sterling 1.5380, Swiss $1.0540, . European Style: rand 11.6470, krone 7.6050, SEK 8.4285, forint 270.25, zloty 3.6970, koruna 24.3400, RUB 62.06, yen 118.55, sing 1.3590, HKD 7.7565, INR 62.09, China 6.1330, pesos 15.07, BRL 2.8695, Dollar Index 94.60, Oil $51.91, 10-year 2.10%, Silver $16.55, Platinum $1,162.13, Palladium $782.50, and Gold. $1,213.02 That’s it for today. Having people here talking while I’m writing is different for me. I usually only hear the songs on the iPod, which right now is playing 10cc: The Things We Do For Love. I guess which would have been a good song last weekend, eh?   I didn’t make it to the ball fields yesterday, and it got really cold overnight here, so I guess I’ll have to wait until tomorrow. I was surprised I didn’t receive any nice or not so nice comments about my wish for when I grow old that I wrote about yesterday. No biggie, just thought it would.  Well, it’s the 20th of February, only another week until March. and you know what March brings, right?  Spring training games. I have my seats I have my parking passes, I am all set to watch my beloved Cardinals play baseball at Roger Dean Stadium!   Well, no 3-day weekend until the end of May, so. hunker down and work diligently, and it’ll be here before you know it!   And with that, it’s time to get off the bus, and get this out the door. I hope you have a Fantastico Friday! Chuck Butler Managing Director EverBank Global Marketslast_img read more

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Welcome to Invisibilia Season 4 The NPR program a

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first_imgWelcome to Invisibilia Season 4! The NPR program and podcast explores the invisible forces that shape human behavior, and we here at Shots are joining in to probe the science of why we act the way we do. In Episode 4, they’re asking: are we destined to repeat our patterns or do we generally stray in surprising directions? – a question increasingly relevant in an age when algorithms are trying to predict everything about our behavior. Here’s an excerpt from the episode.On paper, Shon Hopwood’s life doesn’t make a lot of sense, not even to him.”I don’t have a great excuse as to why I did these things. And everybody always wants that,” he tells me. “It closes the circle for people. But that’s not really how it happened.”To the naked eye, it looked like Shon Hopwood was born into a really good pattern. He grew up in the neighborly, low-crime community of David City, Neb., to a great Christian family that encouraged self-reliance. “My parents basically opened the door in the morning and would say, ‘See you in a few hours.’ It was a good childhood.”Fresh air, loving family, safe community: Those are some pretty good patterns.But for some reason, in college, Hopwood started veering off the graph. He wasn’t that interested in school, so he dropped out and returned to David City to work, and that was all going fine, until one day when his friend Tom asked him down to the bar for a drink.”And he just asked me, he said, ‘What do you think about robbing a bank?,’ ” Hopwood says.”And you know most people would have said, ‘No!’ Or ‘What are you talking about?’ Or walked away, or a million other responses. And my response was, ‘Yes! This is a great idea!’ “And so Hopwood’s path forked. He would become a bank robber.Of course Hopwood had second thoughts. He had them right up to the moment he walked into the bank dressed as a handyman. “I walk in the bank and I pull a mask up and I drop the tool box on the ground. It makes a huge noise so everyone turns and looks at me. And I unzip my coveralls, pull out a 22[-caliber] rifle and yell, ‘Everyone get down. This is a robbery!’ “After that Hopwood recruited a small group of friends and just hit one bank after another until one day, four guys from the FBI tackled him. He was sentenced to 12 years in prison, which was bad enough, but what really cut was that a bunch of people in his hometown disowned his completely blameless parents.”They have to have some reason for why I did these things, because otherwise it just doesn’t compute. Because it didn’t make any sense that me and the people that were involved with me had robbed these banks. I mean one of my co-defendants was the son of the town attorney,” he says.We need to find a predictable pattern, and when it eludes us, we ache for it.Now, because we live in the age of computers, our ability to discern patterns has expanded. Today a computer can scan more data in a minute than you or I could sift in a lifetime, and in that data see things we could never see. Beautiful things and horrible things and even — we’re told — the future.A competition to find the patterns that determine the path of a human lifeAbout two years ago a Princeton sociologist named Matthew Salganik decided to stage a massive computer competition.The idea was inspired by Netflix. In 2006, the company distributed huge amounts of user data to programmers all over the world so they could write computer models that found hidden patterns that improved its predictions for which movies subscribers would like. The competition totally worked out for Netflix. The companies movie choice predictions substantially improved.So Salganik’s plan was to do the exact same thing, except instead of staging a competition to improve predictions of movie preference, he wanted the competition to improve predictions about the things sociologists cared about: high school GPA, which child would persevere when faced with adversity, who would become homeless. Could we, he wondered, harness the pattern-finding abilities of computers to discover new things about how individual lives turned out?”Looking at lots of people and looking at broader patterns helps us have a fuller understanding of what’s possible,” Salganik says. If his competition worked well, it could make the world a better place. After all, if computers could locate the things that predicted stuff like higher grades, policy makers could design better interventions.So Salganik set to work. He got a massive trove of data on 5,000 kids who had been followed from the day they were born, then made that information available to data geeks and researchers across the globe. Four hundred teams were given incredibly detailed information about the kids from birth until age nine, then told to predict their grades — and a handful of other outcomes — at age 15.One day last fall, Salganik sat down to crunch the numbers, figure out which models were best able to predict where the children in the study had ended up, and what he found deeply surprised him.What Salganik wanted to see was at least one computer model entry able to predict with reasonable accuracy the outcomes of each child in the study.But none of the computer models did as well as Salganik expected.If they had, the screen in front of him would have been filled with tall, colorful towers — bars stretching from the floor of the y-axis to the top, indicating that the predictions had gotten close to 100 percent accurate. Instead what he saw was a bunch of squat bars crowded around the bottom like flattened mushrooms, indicating that the predictions were a lot closer to 0 percent accurate than 100 percent.”I would say this is not impressive,” he tells me as he looks at the graph. “I think this is sad. Disappointing.”But was it? Or was it just an accurate representation of how unpredictable our individual lives are?Duncan Watts works at Microsoft Research. He does computational social science, including prediction studies similar to the one that Salganik was doing. In fact over the years, Watts says, he’s done tons. He says when it comes to predicting stuff like what will happen in a particular human life, Watts thinks the outcome that Salganik found is just the outcome.”We find exactly the same pattern everywhere we look… when you’re talking about individual outcomes, there’s a lot of randomness,” Watts says.”And the other half of this conversation is that people don’t like that answer, and so they keep wanting a different answer. They say nature abhors a vacuum. Humans abhor randomness. We like deterministic stories,” Duncan says.We like the idea that patterns can tell us what will happen in life because that idea makes us feel more secure he says.”If you think you can predict things— even if you’re wrong — it means that you get up in the morning and you feel confident,” Watts says. “And so you can invest your time and energy today in things that won’t pay off until tomorrow.”Watts believes being more realistic about patterns is important but hard to pull off because it involves accepting something that feels like a contradiction: that patterns are important and predictive — you can identify things in the lives of kids that tend to help or hurt them — but you can’t say for sure whether those same things would influence the life of any individual kid because randomness has a lot more power over complex things like life than we like to think.Randomness, Watts says, is as important as pattern, though obviously it doesn’t get the same respect in our algorithmic world.A life that no one could predict turns againWhich brings us back to the unusual trajectory of Shon Hopwood.Hopwood was working in the prison law library, checking out books, when a fellow prisoner asked him for help with his case. The guy wanted help to draft a petition the U.S. Supreme Court.Hopwood had never studied law and only had a high school education but he wanted to be helpful so he spent two months working on an argument, then sent off the petition and basically forgot about it.”Then one day I’m walking out to the recreation yard at 6:30,” Hopwood says, “and a friend of mine comes running and screaming out of the housing unit. And this being federal prison my first thought is, ‘What did I say to this guy yesterday that he wants to come and fight me at 6:30 in the morning?’ “The Supreme Court had accepted the appeal he had written.That highly unusual event led to other unusual turns in trajectory, until one fine day, Hopwood found himself moving a box of belongings into a small office at Georgetown University Law School.The bank robber had become a law professor.Proof that even though we yearn for predictable patterns, no matter how many computers we have, it might just be impossible to predict where any single life will go. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

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In 1983 Utah was the first state to lower its blo

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first_imgIn 1983, Utah was the first state to lower its blood alcohol limit from 0.10 to 0.08 for impaired driving. It would take nearly two decades for every state to follow suit, but as they did, the nation’s rate of alcohol-related traffic deaths dropped 10 percent. Now, Utah is pioneering the move to lower it once again. Beginning Dec. 30 — yes, the day before New Year’s Eve — Utahns will have to be extra careful about drinking and driving. On Sunday, the state’s blood alcohol content limit will drop from 0.08 percent to 0.05 percent, marking the strictest DUI law in the country.To give you an idea of the difference in consumption, for a man weighing 180 pounds, it takes about four drinks to reach a BAC of 0.08 percent, according to the American Beverage Institute. But to reach .05, it’s about half as many drinks and can be even fewer for women.Utah law limits the type of and strength of alcohol depending on where it is purchased, with different limits on beer and heavy beer.Still, the current limit of .08 is “a significant amount of drinking” for a lot of people, says Utah state Rep. Norm Thurston, a Republican.Thurston sponsored the bill to lower the limit in 2017 at the request of the National Transportation Safety Board, which has been urging states to lower DUI limits to 0.05 since 2013.Thurston says he believes the new limit will save lives because it sends a strict message to anyone who has been drinking not to get behind the wheel. “You would think that we’re already there as a society,” but Thurston says he meets a lot of people who say they think it’s safe to drink and drive, “just a little bit.”Critics slammed the Republican, a practicing member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, for running the bill. The church urges its members not to consume alcohol, and many accused him, as a Mormon, of trying to legislate drinkers and non-Mormons.The American Beverage Institute, an alcohol trade organization, has been a vocal critic of the law. Spokesman Jackson Shedelbower says he doesn’t believe the change will save lives. The lower limit targets social, moderate drinkers, not “legitimately drunk drivers,” he says.”Nearly 70 percent of alcohol-related fatalities in this country are caused by someone with … a BAC of 0.15 and above,” Shedlbower says, three times the new limit in Utah.So, will drunken driving arrests in Utah increase starting Dec. 30? Probably not, says Sgt. Nick Street with the Utah Highway Patrol.”Troopers and officers throughout the state should already be arresting based on impairment, not based on a per se limit, and that standard is not going to change,” he says.Street says he believes the law has already changed drivers’ behaviors, even though it hasn’t taken effect yet.”I think people are making better decisions on the front end of a night,” by using ride-hailing apps or choosing designated drivers. Copyright 2018 KUER 90.1. To see more, visit KUER 90.1.last_img read more

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The Equality and Human Rights Commission EHRC is

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first_imgThe Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) is to write to Manchester United and football’s Premier League after Disability News Service (DNS) passed on concerns that disabled fans had had their mobility aids confiscated by stewards.Staff at Manchester United’s Old Trafford ground tried to stop several Arsenal fans – including one supporter in his 80s – from taking their seats because they were using walking sticks, which stewards claimed could be used as weapons.They were visiting Britain’s richest football club to watch what was billed as one of the biggest matches of the season, on 17 May.The stewards told the London club’s disabled supporters that they would not be allowed to watch the match because they had not alerted the club about their equipment in advance.They claimed the fans could also pose a health and safety risk in the event of a stadium evacuation.The disabled supporters were only allowed into the stadium to take their seats after the intervention of an officer from Greater Manchester police.But after they had been escorted to their seats, their sticks were confiscated and held by stewards until the end of the match, on 17 May.After DNS asked the EHRC to comment, it said today (Friday) that it was writing urgently to both Manchester United and the Premier League to raise concerns about the treatment of disabled fans. It warned that it had not ruled out legal action.A police spokesman confirmed the incident had taken place and that the Arsenal fans had only been allowed into the stadium after the officer called the stadium control room to seek clarification of the ground regulations.The spokesman said: “He was told if able, the supporters could use their walking aids to reach their seats and these would then be stored by stewards throughout the game and returned post match.”But he declined to comment when asked if the force was comfortable with the club’s policy.Manchester Utd has been repeatedly criticised for failing to provide the recommended number of spaces for wheelchair-users at Old Trafford.It admitted last August that it only had 120 wheelchair spaces, when official guidance states that there should be at least 280.A Manchester Utd spokesman said: “Our club policy is to encourage any supporters who require the use of crutches or a walking aid to contact the club in advance to ensure each case is adequately risk assessed and that we can ensure safe evacuation in the event of emergency.“On some rare occasions, we have also experienced such devices being used as weapons.“This policy is displayed at the turnstiles and on our website. The disability liaison officers from both clubs also communicate this policy in advance.“Where supporters arrive without having pre-notified us of the need for such devices, our stewarding team performs a dynamic risk assessment which usually involves finding a solution to accompany the supporter to their seat and storing the walking device during the game.“At the game in question, a significant number of visiting supporters who had not pre-notified the club arrived with walking devices.“Therefore the above system was put into place. No person was refused entry to the stadium.”When asked whether the club would be apologising to the disabled fans, and whether it was concerned that it might have breached the Equality Act, the spokesman refused to comment further.Speaking before the news emerged of the EHRC’s action, a spokesperson for Level Playing Field (LPF), the user-led organisation that works to improve access to sporting venues, said: “Manchester United is, by all accounts, the only Premier League club with this policy.“LPF would always advise clubs not to confiscate walking aids (such as walking sticks or crutches) from disabled fans and believes that such a practice may even be deemed as discriminatory.”Rebecca Hilsenrath, chief legal officer at the EHRC, told DNS: “Over the past months, we have received a number of complaints about provision for disabled fans at the Premier League.  “This has included discriminatory policies that prevent disabled fans having the same opportunities to attend football matches as non-disabled people.“Complaints have been about disabled fans being prevented from obtaining season tickets, a lack of adequate space for wheelchair-users, and problems for families with young disabled children being unable to sit together to enjoy a game.  “Some of the most recent complaints have concerned Manchester United and the removal of walking aids from disabled away fans. “We are writing to both the Premier League and to Manchester United today to seek urgent assurances that disabled fans will be treated fairly and equally as the law requires. “We are also seeking urgent meetings with them to clear up the issues which have been identified and agree commitments to early progress.” She added: “Premier League clubs have a legal duty under the Equality Act 2010 to ensure reasonable adjustment for disabled fans and to make sure they do not discriminate against them in the provision of goods and services.“While our preference is always to work with organisations to avoid costly legal proceedings, all options remain on the table because disabled fans deserve better.”A spokeswoman for the Sports Grounds Safety Authority (SGSA) said: “We can’t comment on specific incidents at clubs as we don’t know the facts.”But she added: “The SGSA believes disabled fans should be able to support their team and have access into sports grounds.”She said the authority did not have the regulatory powers to take action against a club for anything other than breaching the rule that Premier League and Championship clubs have to be all-seater stadiums.She added: “The SGSA’s aim is to ensure the safety of all spectators at sports grounds. We strongly promote accessibility at sports grounds and have created guidance that sets out the standards for accessible provision at stadiums.“We are working with our partners at the Department for Culture Media and Sport and Level Playing Field to promote the importance of accessibility at sports grounds.“We use our influence on safety advisory groups to promote accessibility and any other issues that we think need to be improved.”But she added: “As it currently stands, it is down to the individual to take action against a club if they feel they have been discriminated against.”An Arsenal spokesman said: “We are sorry to hear of the difficulties experienced by our disabled supporters and will be working closely with our travelling fans to avoid any similar situations next season.”He declined to comment further.Picture: Old Trafford by Wikistadiums.org is licensed under https://creativecommons.org/last_img read more

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Repurposing Old Tech Equipment

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first_img The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Add to Queue October 1, 2005 Next Article 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List With the mountains of old cell phones, computers, TVs and various other outdated technological products piling up, savvy entrepreneurs are getting into the business of e-cycling. According to an industry report from the International Association of Electronics Recyclers, 1.5 billion pounds of electronic equipment are processed annually, and the association estimates that around 3 billion units of consumer electronics will be scrapped in the next decade. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates around 55 million PCs will be landfilled and 150 million PCs recycled in 2005.There’s quite a buzz going on right now within the technology recycling arena, according to Rick Goss, director of environmental affairs at the Electronic Industries Alliance, a partnership representing U.S. technology manufacturers. He points to states like California and Maine, which have recently enacted programs to mandate recycling of old technologies, giving entrepreneurs an opening to offer recycling services to companies who will pay to dispose of their old equipment. In California, for instance, an Electronic Waste Recycling Fee has been charged to every purchaser of a new computer monitor or TV since July, which will help provide funds to recyclers (both consumers and collectors) when the items are recycled (much like aluminum and glass redemption programs). Other states and federal entities are considering similar programs. Says Goss, “It’s incumbent upon the institutional players–industry, government, retailers, recyclers–to come up with mechanisms that allow the consumer a readily available way to turn in a used [tech] item and know that it’s going to be properly recycled.”Randy and Vera Lewis, husband-and-wife entrepreneurs, got into the game with their business, SoCal Computer Recyclers Inc., in Harbor City, California. Randy originally got interested back in 1998 when his recently purchased computer monitor broke. Not wanting to just throw it away, he researched e-cycling systems and discovered a void in his local community. He started the business that same year. Fast-forward to 2005, when Randy, 36, and Vera, 40, recycle old technology for businesses and consumers. Depending on the condition of the items, the Lewises wipe out the data before selling the equipment to resellers or donating it to nonprofit organizations, or they dismantle the equipment and sell its parts. They project $1.2 million in 2005 sales. Collecting obsolete items at big e-waste recycling events is actually fun for the pair. “I get to see all kinds of stuff–[I think] we’ve got every single piece of equipment from Tron,” jokes Randy.Opportunities abound, from data declassification and donation of usable items to cleaning data from old computers and shipping usable products to less fortunate countries. Though the Lewises don’t have a set plan for their company’s future, they are considering specializing in either data declassification or shipping used computers overseas. Nichole L. Torres This story appears in the October 2005 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » –shares Repurposing Old Tech Equipment Technology Magazine Contributor 3 min read What do you do with old tech equipment? These entrepreneurs give it a whole new life. Apply Now »last_img read more

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Yahoo to Provide Details on Massive Data Breach

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first_img A Petition Is Coming ? for a ‘Game of Thrones’ Final Season Do-Over Privacy Policy   |   Terms of Use DiCaprio, Pitt want to team up again after Tarantino hit Former world paragliding champion Rémy soars over Pyrenees Up Next: Next Article Memorial Day Weekend Heat Wave Could Smash May Records The requested video is no longer available Add to Queue A LifeMinute with Ryan Seacrest Apply Now » Cannes: ticketless festival-goers seek seats for films Cannes: ticketless festival-goers seek seats for films Congress Is Back as President Trump Heads to the UK 2 Musts for Tackling Allergy Season Delicious Summer Entertaining Ideas It was not clear how such a disclosure might affect Yahoo’s plan to sell its email service and other core internet properties to Verizon for $4.8 billion. Sunlight Shines on Grand Canyon Autoplay: On | Off Summer Beauty Survival Must-Haves Saint Laurent dazzles with men’s collection on Malibu beach Beyond Meat Earnings Are Beyond Analyst Expectations Yahoo to Provide Details on Massive Data Breach Figure Out Your Family Tree Just in Time For Father’s Day 2 Musts for Tackling Allergy Season September 22, 2016 Yahoo Inc. will disclose details this week of a data breach that compromised the data of several hundred million users, technology news site Recode reported on Thursday, citing unnamed sources familiar with the company’s plan.Reuters was not able to immediately confirm the report.It was not clear how such a disclosure might affect Yahoo’s plan to sell its email service and other core internet properties to Verizon Communications Inc. for $4.8 billion.Yahoo might have to force users to reset their passwords, the Recode report said, citing unnamed sources.The report follows an Aug. 1 story in the technology news site, Motherboard, that said a cyber criminal known as Peace was selling the data of about 200 million Yahoo users, but did not confirm its authenticity.The Motherboard report was published a week after Verizon announced its deal with Yahoo.Peace was selling that batch of data on the 200 million Yahoo users for 3 bitcoin, or around $1,860, according to Motherboard. The possibly compromised data includes user names, birth dates, some backup email addresses and scrambled passwords, Motherboard said.(Reporting by Jim Finkle in Boston and Aishwarya Venugopal in Bengaluru; Editing by Ted Kerr and Bernadette Baum) 31shares HBO’s ‘Chernobyl’ Phenomenon Sophie Turner Talks Dark Phoenix, Co-Star Jessica Chastain and GoT New York takes aim at skyscrapers’ sky-high energy usage A LifeMinute with John Lithgow: The Actor Discusses His Latest Projects Turning Up the Heat in the Southeast for Holiday Weekend 2 Delicious Summer Entertaining Ideas A Petition Is Coming ? for a ‘Game of Thrones’ Final Season Do-Over Reuters North Carolina superintendent says new app can help reduce violence in schools 2020 Ballots May Have a New Box to Check ? Vice President Photo of solider placing flag at Tomb of Unknown Solider goes viral IndyCar Beefing Up Business as Indy 500 Approaches Figure Out Your Family Tree Just in Time For Father’s Day 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List How Human Behavior is Hurting Animals and What We Can Do to Protect Them Yahoo! Figure Out Your Family Tree Just in Time For Father’s Day Father’s Day is such a special moment for the whole family to come together and spend quality time with one another – and those are moments dad will cherish. What better way for dad to connect with his loved ones than learning about his family’s stor Lifeminute tv Embed Justin Bieber Launches Plant-Based Deodorant Figure Out Your Family Tree Just in Time For Father’s Day A Safe Way to Get Rid Of Bugs in Your Home Sophie Turner Talks Dark Phoenix, Co-Star Jessica Chastain and GoT Figure Out Your Family Tree Just in Time For Father’s Day Summer Beauty Survival Must-Haves Albany Steps Closer to Releasing Trump’s State Tax Returns After Assembly Vote The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Economy adds 75K jobs in May Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Guitarist Don ‘Fingers’ Felder Releases New Album 2020 Toyota Camry Swimwear Styles for All Shapes and Sizes Airbnb Wants to Take You on an All-Inclusive Adventure Southern Charm’ Star Talks New Season Airbnb Wants to Take You on an All-Inclusive Adventure US Navy: Russian destroyer almost collided with cruiser in the Philippine Sea Memorial Day Weekend Heat Wave Could Smash May Records Heat Snapshot This story originally appeared on Reuters 1 min read Economy adds 75K jobs in May BACK IHOP Sees Explosive Growth in To-Go Sales Summer is here and there are some great looks this season for women of all shapes and sizes. Check out the hottest styles for hourglass, rectangle and pear shaped women. A Safe Way to Get Rid Of Bugs in Your Homelast_img read more

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Driving Business Innovation OutSystems Announces Agenda for NextStep Conferences in Denver and

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first_imgCustomers, Analysts, OutSystems Leader to Share Insights at Industry’s Top Event for Low-Code and Digital TransformationOutSystems announced the keynote and customer speakers for NextStep 2019, the world’s largest and most comprehensive event series showcasing the best in low-code and digital transformation. This year’s conferences will take place in Denver, on Oct. 2-3, and in Amsterdam, on Oct. 29-30 with more than 3,000 people expected to attend the events.Attendees will hear from OutSystems customers about ways they have broken the barriers of innovation using the OutSystems low-code development platform. World-class customers speaking at NextStep 2019 include Deloitte, Microsoft, The Pokemon Company, GM Financial, Humana, Kent State University, Mednax, Medtronic, Randstad, Aetna, Prosegur, Burton Snowboards, and many more.Marketing Technology News: Televerde Joins United Nations Global Compact AIMarketing Technology NewsNewsNextStepOutSystems Previous ArticleMerkle Releases Its Q2 2019 Digital Marketing ReportNext ArticleMarTech Interview with Jaime Romero, Vice President of Global ABM at MRP Both events will feature keynote addresses by OutSystems CEO and founder Paulo Rosado. Rosado will share his insights on how low-code is helping world-class companies solve business problems and achieve unprecedented levels of transformation and ROI. He also will show how OutSystems continues to set the pace as the global leader in the low-code sector by demonstrating new product capabilities.At NextStep in Denver, Gartner vice president and principal analyst Mark Driver will deliver a keynote about low-code’s prospects for more widespread industry adoption. Driver, the co-author of the Gartner Low-Code Evaluation Guide, is an expert on companies’ development of new, more flexible architectures for next-gen digital transformation leveraging technologies such as IoT, business rules management, and artificial intelligence.Marketing Technology News: An Out-of-Home Advertising Industry First: AdQuick.com Announces Performance-based OOH Advertising – Cost Per Engagement (CPE) ModelJohn Rymer, Forrester vice president and principal analyst serving application development & delivery professionals, will co-headline the Amsterdam event. He will speak about how low-code is spreading throughout the enterprise. Rymer, winner of the prestigious Bill Bluestein Research Award, leads Forrester’s Application Development and Delivery research on cloud platforms and low-code development.The conferences will also feature more than 50 deep-dive tech sessions covering topics such as AI, IoT, RPA, and DevOps. Tech sessions will explore a wide variety of topics, including: “Branching Your Way to Low-Code Perfection,” “Mobile Game Development with OutSystems,” and “Mobile Synchronization Patterns for Large Volumes of Data.”Marketing Technology News: A SWOT Analysis Template is Crucial to Understanding the Business Better | SpendEdge Lists Key Steps to Consider While Developing a SWOT Analysis Templatecenter_img Driving Business Innovation: OutSystems Announces Agenda for NextStep Conferences in Denver and Amsterdam Business Wire2 hours agoJuly 23, 2019 last_img read more

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Study uncovers details about human immune response to dengue infection

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first_img Source:https://www.med.uvm.edu/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 29 2019About 40 percent of the global population is at risk for contracting dengue – the most important mosquito-borne viral infection and a close “cousin” of the Zika virus – and yet, no effective treatment or safe licensed vaccine exists. But a new study, reported recently in the Lancet’s open-access journal EBioMedicine, has uncovered details about the human immune response to infection with dengue that could provide much-needed help to the evaluation of dengue vaccine formulations and assist with advancing safe and effective candidate vaccines.Like Zika, yellow fever and West Nile viruses, dengue belongs to a group of mosquito-borne viruses that circulate in many tropical countries. However, without effective treatment and a safe licensed vaccine, dengue infection can lead to debilitating illnesses, including severe pain and hemorrhagic fever. One of the challenges of dengue infection is that it can be caused by one of four versions – or serotypes – of the virus, which are numbered dengue 1 to 4. Infection by one serotype typically results in long-term protection specific to that serotype. However, a later exposure to a different serotype can result in more severe disease. Experts believe this phenomenon occurs due to a part of the immune response, the antibodies, which may recognize and promote the second infection rather than defeat it.”Trying to tease out the protective immune response in naturally infected patients is a challenge, since people living in high-risk areas likely have been exposed to multiple serotypes of the virus, which confound the observation,” said senior study author Sean Diehl, Ph.D., an assistant professor of microbiology and molecular genetics at the University of Vermont’s (UVM) Vaccine Testing Center and Center for Translational Global Infectious Disease Research. “In our model, we controlled the infection for safety reasons and the participants were monitored for six months in order to understand the biological changes that occur following the infection.”Related StoriesCommon cold virus strain could be a breakthrough in bladder cancer treatmentAn injection of nanoparticles for spinal cord injuriesScripps CHAVD wins $129 million NIH grant to advance new HIV vaccine approachOver a six-month period, Diehl and his colleagues tracked the immune response and measured its different aspects, from the levels of certain immune blood cells to the levels of antibodies they produce and how these antibodies can recognize different dengue serotypes. In this study, co-led by Huy Tu, a fifth-year Ph.D. candidate in UVM’s Cellular and Molecular Biomedical Sciences program, the group defined the evolution of the antibody response in dengue infection in a controlled human model where subjects were treated with a weakened version of the virus.The research showed that the study participants developed an antibody response against the virus as early as two weeks after the infection. This immune response was highly focused against the infecting serotype, neutralized the virus, and persisted for months afterwards. With a comprehensive approach, the study dissected the antibody response at the single-cell level resolution, mapped the interaction between human antibodies to structural components on the virus’s surface, and connected the functional features of the response during acute infection to time points past recovery.last_img read more

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Man Goes Blind After Wearing Contact Lenses in the Shower

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first_imgOur fantastic Fight for Sight supporter, Nick Humphreys, is raising awareness of the need for correct contact lens care and clearer information on contact lens packaging, after losing his sight in one eye to Acanthamoeba keratitis: https://t.co/ooUYXWlyYF #ContactLenses #AKby Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoNucificTop Dr. Reveals The 1 Nutrient Your Gut Must HaveNucificUndoEditorChoice.com30 Chilling Locations – Abandoned And Left To DecayEditorChoice.comUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndo — Fight for Sight (@fightforsightUK) July 9, 2019 Your daily shower isn’t usually a health risk, but for one man in England, it may have led to a serious eye infection that left him blind in one eye, according to news reports. The man, 29-year-old Nick Humphreys of Shropshire, England, typically left his contact lenses in while showering, without knowing that this practice can increase the risk of eye infections, according to PA Media, a U.K.-based media agency. In 2018, he contracted Acanthamoeba keratitis, a rare parasitic infection of the cornea, or the eye’s transparent outer covering. “If I’d have known how dangerous it was to wear contacts in the shower, I would never have got them in the first place,” Humphreys told PA Media. [‘Eye’ Can’t Look: 9 Eyeball Injuries That Will Make You Squirm] AdvertisementDon’t Flush Your Contact Lenses! Here’s WhyHere’s what happens when you flush contact lenses down the toilet or drain. Hint: It’s not good for the environment.Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65916-parasitic-eye-infection-showering-with-contact-lenses.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0001:0001:00Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball02:31Surgical Robotics00:29Video – Giggly Robot关闭  Originally published on Live Science. 27 Oddest Medical Case Reports 8 Awful Parasite Infections That Will Make Your Skin Crawlcenter_img Acanthamoeba is a single-celled amoeba that’s commonly found in water, soil and air, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Contact lens wearers face a risk of contracting this infection if they engage in certain practices, such as disinfecting lenses with tap water or swimming or showering while wearing lenses, the CDC said. This amoeba has a particular affinity for the surfaces of contact lenses, meaning the lenses can be “a vehicle for the harboring, transmission and delivery of microorganisms to the eye,” according to a 2010 review paper on the topic published in the Journal of Optometry. But when Humphreys started wearing contact lenses in 2013 so he could play sports without glasses, he wasn’t aware of this showering risk. He would often hop in the shower with his contact lenses in after a morning workout. “I thought nothing of it at the time. I was never told not to wear contact lenses in the shower. There’s no warning on the packaging, and my opticians never mentioned a risk,” Humphreys said. After he was diagnosed with Acanthamoeba keratitis in early 2018, he was given eyedrops for his infection, but a few months later, he suddenly went blind in his right eye, according to PA Media. Humphreys was then prescribed a stronger medication, which needed to be applied to his eyes every hour, even at night. Humphreys became housebound and experienced severe pain in his right eye. “The pain in my eye was too much, and the only time I would leave was to visit the hospital,” Humphreys told PA Media. He would later undergo two operations in his right eye, the first to strengthen the tissue in his cornea and the second to protect the cornea with a graft of tissue from a fetal placenta. That procedure is known as an amniotic membrane transplant. Although his infection cleared up, Humphreys remains blind in his right eye. He is scheduled to undergo a corneal transplant in August. This operation replaces damaged corneal tissue with healthy corneal tissue from a deceased donor. Humphreys now works with the charity Fight for Sight to raise awareness about the risks of showering or swimming with contact lenses. “It’s crucial that people out there know this is a reality and it can happen because of something as simple as getting in the shower,” Humphreys said. 27 Devastating Infectious Diseaseslast_img read more

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