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Archives for: August 5, 2019

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first_imgShareTweet “They are appealing to anyone who believes they may have been a victim of a burglary and who have not reported the matter to police, or anyone with any information about suspicious activity in the Skeoge Road, Gleneagles and Fern Park areas, to contact them at the Reducing Offending Unit at Strand Road on 101 quoting 1510 07/08/17.“Information can also be given anonymously through the independent charity Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.”MAN ARRESTED AS POLICE PROBE BURGLARY SPREE AT DERRY HOMES was last modified: August 8th, 2017 by John2John2 Tags: POLICE in Derry are appealing for information following reports of burglaries in the Skeoge Road, Gleneagles and Fern Park areas last night.A PSNI spokesperson said that sometime between 4 pm and 9 pm, entry was gained to a house in the Skeoge Road area, through an unlocked door, and a tablet device taken on Monday, August 7.“Later, at around 11 pm, a house at Gleneagles was also entered through an unlocked door, and a mobile phone stolen. “A further burglary at a house in Fern Park sometime on Monday, was reported to police today.“Police were called to the report of a male trying door handles of cars in the Gleneagles area shortly after 11pm on Monday evening and arrested a man a short time later.“The 23 year old man remains in custody at this time.“Officers have recovered property belonging to victims of the earlier burglaries from this individual. FERN PARKGLENEAGLESMAN ARRESTED AS POLICE PROBE BURGLARY SPREE AT DERRY HOMESPSNI DERRYSKEOGE ROADlast_img read more

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Tyler Barker Tyler

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first_img Tyler Barker Tyler Barker is currently the Interim News Director and Digital Content Manager for WOAY-TV. I was promoted to this job in Mid-November. I still will fill in on weather from time to time. Follow me on Facebook and Twitter @wxtylerb. Have any news tips or weather questions? Email me at tbarker@woay.com Twitter Next PostGirls Basketball Player of the Year – Gabby Lupardus Facebook Mail Home NewsWatch Featured Three Car Crash Involving A Tractor-Trailer On I-77 In Beckley With Entrapment Google+ Previous PostMercer County Holds Annual Vietnam Veteran Recognition Daycenter_img Linkedin FeaturedLocal NewsNewsWatch Three Car Crash Involving A Tractor-Trailer On I-77 In Beckley With Entrapment By Tyler BarkerMar 25, 2018, 18:40 pm 386 0 Pinterest BECKLEY, WV (WOAY) – Emergency crews are on the scene of a three vehicle accident on I-77 near mm 44.Officials tell WOAY that two vehicles and a tractor-trailer were involved in a crash around 6:30pm. The crash happened right before the Harper Road Exit.We are told there are entrapments but no word on injuries or what caused the accident.Stay with WOAY on this developing story. Tumblr Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *Comment Name * Email * Websitelast_img read more

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On May 9th Forum Uranium Corp and Mega Uranium L

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first_imgOn May 9th, Forum Uranium Corp. and Mega Uranium Ltd. announced a new basement-hosted uranium discovery on the Opie target on  the NW Athabasca property. Seven of nine holes drilled on the Opie zone encountered uranium mineralization at shallow depths,  within a zone of strong red hydrothermal alteration in basement rocks. The zone remains open along strike and down dip, so there is great potential for more mineralization within the zone. There are 15 more gravity targets , untested by drilling, which could prove to be multiple mineralized zones on the property. With further discoveries like Forum’s,  the western Athabasca Basin, could prove to be on the same scale as the Eastern Athabasca Basin. Attached is the link to a more descriptive analysis of the discovery and buy recommendation issued by Dundee Securities. GLD added 67,954 troy ounces of gold…but over at SLV an authorized participant added a whopping 3,299,537 ounces of silver.It was nice to see some positive price action in gold for a change…and by 3:00 p.m. Hong Kong time it was up about ten bucks…and was still up ten dollars going into the London p.m. gold fix, which came shortly before 10:00 a.m. in New York.The gold price then jumped about $15 once the fix was in…and by lunchtime in New York, it had reached its high of day, which Kitco recorded as $1,584.80 spot.  From there, gold got sold off ten dollars in short order…and then traded sideways into the close of electronic trading.Gold closed the Thursday session at $1,574.30 spot…up $34.00 on the day.  Net volume was immense once again at 182,000 contracts.Silver had a pretty decent day as well…and was up about 50 cents by 3:00 p.m. Hong Kong time.  From there the price slid until 1:00 p.m. in London…about twenty minutes before the Comex open.  From there, the silver price rose in fits and starts until noon in New York.  And, like gold, that was the high tick of the day…$28.35 spot…and from there silver got sold off to the $28 mark at the close of Comex trading…and then traded flat into the close electronic trading at 5:15 p.m. Eastern time.Silver finished the Thursday trading day at $28.05 spot…up 78 cents.  Volume was pretty heavy at 44,000 contracts.The dollar index oscillated within about a 40 basis point price range yesterday…bouncing off the 81.6 price level for the second time in as many day…and finished up about 15 basis points.  Not much to see here.The gold stocks gapped up at the open in New York.  The London p.m. gold fix at 10:00 a.m…and the New York high at noon yesterday, are the most prominent features on this chart.  After the high tick was in, the stocks faded a bit, but held onto a large portion of their gains.  The HUI finished up 4.45%.For the most part, the silver stocks were on fire yesterday, but three of the seven stocks that make up Nick Laird’s Silver Sentiment Index did not share in the fun…and the SSI finished up only 2.87%.(Click on image to enlarge)The CME’s Daily Delivery Report was another yawner, which it has a tendency to become once we get past the first full week of deliveries in any delivery month.  They reported that 35 gold and 21 silver contracts were posted for delivery on Monday.Both GLD and SLV had changes to report yesterday.  GLD added 67,954 troy ounces of gold…but over at SLV an authorized participant added a whopping 3,299,537 ounces of silver.  Considering the lousy silver price action of earlier this week…and the smallish increase in the price of silver yesterday…I would assume [like the counterintuitive deposit in SLV on Monday] that this deposit had something to do with covering a short position.  But, as I mentioned yesterday, we won’t really know for sure until the report comes out over at shortsqueeze.com next week…and even then I don’t think that this addition will be in it, because I believe that it occurred after the cut-off date.  We’ll see.The U.S. Mint did not have a sales report yesterday.Over at the Comex-approved depositories on Wednesday, they reported receiving 605,838 troy ounces of silver…and shipped 288,396 ounces of the stuff out the door.  The link to that action is here.Today’s first chart is courtesy of Washington state reader S.A.  As you can see, it’s the 3-year dollar index…and as one commentator over at Zero Hedge put it yesterday…”When the US dollar is your ‘safe haven’, you know you’ve hit rock bottom.”  Amen to that.(Click on image to enlarge)Here’s another happy looking chart…and should make everyone on a ‘blue pill’ diet feel a little better.  The chart and dialogue say it all.(Click on image to enlarge)I said I was going to post the charts on silver yesterday that German gold analyst Dimitri Speck sent me earlier this week, but they got preempted by others, so here they are now.  The first one is the 14-year silver chart from August 1998 to the end of 2011.  Three stand-out features are the 12 o’clock noon London silver fix…and in New York it’s the secondary decline at the London p.m. gold fix at 10:00 a.m. Eastern time…and, surprisingly enough, the high for silver on average over the last fourteen years of Comex trading comes at twelve o’clock noon in New York…exactly what happened with silver during yesterday’s price action.  You can read into that what you wish.(Click on image to enlarge)Dimitri’s second chart for silver is just for 2011…and even a cursory glance tells you that it’s an entirely different looking beast than the previous chart.  Now the three stand-out features on this chart are the usual London silver fix at noon local time…but the high in Comex trading in New York is now 10:30 a.m….not noon.  And the amazing thing is that there is now a secondary low equivalent to the London silver fix that occurs shortly after 3:00 p.m. in electronic trading…and the whole chart has a negative bias to it as well.  As you can tell, the selling in the New York session last year became much more ferocious once the high was in for the day.(Click on image to enlarge)Dimitri’s gold Intraday Price Movements charts for gold showed up on the Internet about ten years ago and caused a sensation when they did.  This is the first time he’s done it for silver, so these charts are new for me as well.I have the usual number of stories…and I hope you find a few that float your boat.The vast majority of people do not seek wisdom; they seek affirmation of their core beliefs. – Author unknownI don’t know what to make of yesterday’s price action.  I was certainly happy to see prices move higher…but I found the huge volume that went with it rather disturbing.  I’d rather see light volume on big price moves…and that certainly wasn’t the case yesterday.Well, all the stories that I’ve been posting this week have led me…and probably yourself…to the obvious conclusion that the entire world is starting to float off the rails, especially in Europe.  But don’t kid yourself, if Greece goes, it won’t be too long before the rest of the E.U…and it’s beloved currency…follow it down the drain.  Right after that will come the rest of the world, as the economic, financial and monetary systems of this planet are one giant Gordian Knot…and no amount of cheating or ‘thinking outside the box’ will make any difference.  There’s no way out of this where there will be one man standing.  And if there is one man standing, it will redefine the word Pyrrhic Victory.The only thing left of value will be hard assets…with gold and silver at the top of the list…whether it is remonetized or not.Today we get the much anticipated [at least by me] Commitment of Traders Report…and as I’ve mentioned several times already this week, it will be one for the record books.  I’m particularly interested in seeing the situation in silver…the Commercial net short position…and the positions of the ‘1-4’ and ‘5-8’ short holders in that metal.  It’s just too bad that it won’t include what happened during the 24 hours and 15 minutes after the Tuesday cut-off, as that included the absolute low.Here’s the Total PMs Pool for all precious metals that Nick Laird keeps updated on a daily basis.  We just hit another new high [barely] in physical ounces in all four precious metals combined.  If you check the period from the end of December to the close of trading yesterday on this chart, you will see that the ‘total ounces held’ has been in a permanent up-trend.  During that time period gold rose and fell about $250…and silver rose and fell more than $10…platinum rose and fell about $310…and palladium rose and fell about $150.  None of this price movement had anything to do with the physical market…it was all paper trading in the Comex futures market.(Click on image to enlarge)The gold price did nothing through all of Far East trading on their Friday afternoon, but shortly after London opened, the price has ticked up about ten bucks.  Silver traded within a 20 cent range during the same time period, but is also up in mid-morning London trading.  Volume’s are already monstrous, so it’s obvious that these rallies are running into massive resistance from JPMorgan et al.  It will be interesting to see how things unfold once trading begins in New York at 8:20 a.m. Eastern time.And as I hit the ‘send’ button at 5:20 a.m. Eastern time, it appears that the rallies in both gold and silver have been stopped in their respective tracks for the moment.  Gold is currently up ten bucks…and silver is only up 17 cents.There’s still the opportunity to either readjust your portfolio, or get fully invested in the continuing major up-leg of this bull market in both silver and gold…and I respectfully suggest that you take a trial subscription to either Casey Research’s International Speculator [junior gold and silver exploration companies], or BIG GOLD [large producers], with all our best (and current) recommendations…as well as the archives. Don’t forget that our 90-day guarantee of satisfaction is in effect for both publications.I hope you have a good weekend…and I’ll see here tomorrow sometime. Sponsor Advertisementlast_img read more

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By Chris Wood Senior Analyst We know that we and

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first_imgBy Chris Wood, Senior AnalystWe know that we (and all living systems) inherit our genetic traits through a naturally occurring information storage system known as deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA. DNA consists of a linear sequence of the chemical bases adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine (denoted by the symbols A, C, G, and T), attached to a repeating linear chain made up of alternating sugar and phosphate segments and bound together with hydrogen bonds in a double helix to complementary bases. The “A” of one strand always forms a base pair with the “T” of the other strand, and “C” always forms a base pair with “G.”Our molecular blueprint for life, the haploid human genome, comprises approximately three billion DNA base pairs, divided into 23 pairs of chromosomes ranging in size from about 50 million to 250 million bases. Contained within these chromosomes are approximately 23,000 smaller regions, called genes, each one containing the recipe for a protein or group of related proteins that are produced in a linear, step-by-step process.First (and we’ve simplified things here), in transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase converts the DNA strand base for base into messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA has the same sequence as the DNA, except that thymine (T) is replaced with uracil (U). The mRNA then carries the information out of the cell nucleus into the cytoplasm for the second step in protein production, called translation.Once in the cytoplasm, the mRNA interacts with a specialized complex called a ribosome, which “reads” the sequence of mRNA bases and translates them into proteins. These proteins go on to play key roles in the structure and function of all cells, including the regulation and execution of subsequent transcription and translation.This flow of information from DNA to RNA to proteins is one of the fundamental principles of molecular biology – so important that it is sometimes called the “central dogma.”The important takeaway for our purposes is that DNA itself is trapped in the cell nucleus. It’s RNA’s job to get the information out of the nucleus and into the cytoplasm, transforming you from a chemical recipe to a real living, breathing human. Because of RNA we can build proteins. We are made of proteins. In other words, RNA builds life. And that’s big.But there is something else amazing about RNA that could revolutionize how doctors treat many (if not most) chronic human diseases. And nobody knew about it until just a few years ago.Back in 1986, a geneticist named Rich Jorgensen was working at a small biotech startup in California. He was tasked with creating a spectacular new flower, to help attract venture capital funding for the company. His plan was to create a very, very purple petunia. So he inserted an extra copy of the purple-producing gene into the plant’s DNA. But instead of producing purple, Jorgensen’s petunia instead bloomed with white flowers, the complete opposite of what the scientist expected. Inserting the extra purple-producing gene had resulted in the flowers completely losing their pigmentation. This was a big puzzle. And it took another decade of scientific research (and countless experiments with flowers, fruit flies, worms, and other organisms) to figure out what was going on.Completely by accident, Jorgensen had stumbled upon an ancient secret inside living cells – a process that cells use to turn down, or silence, the activity of specific genes. This process is now known as RNA interference, or RNAi.RNAi is thought to have evolved about a billion years ago, as a cellular defense mechanism against invaders such as RNA viruses and to combat the spread of harmful, mutation-causing genetic elements called transposons, within a cell’s DNA. It works by destroying the messenger (mRNAs) carrying genetic information to the cell’s protein factories. By killing the mRNAs and not allowing the protein specified by that gene to be made, the gene is rendered essentially inactive.When Jorgensen inserted the extra purple-producing gene into the petunia’s DNA, it triggered the cell’s RNAi to silence all the purple-producing genes because the cell thought the recipe for the protein looked fishy. Exactly why the cell thought this is a bit too complex to go into here. But in very simple terms, the instructions Jorgensen inserted to make more purple happened to have a suspicious viral shape.What’s important is that with RNAi, scientists had discovered a way to effectively silence genes one at a time (by shutting down the protein-building process), just based on knowing their sequence. Since many, if not most, chronic human diseases result from inappropriate protein production or improper protein activity, the implications for the treatment of disease were profound. Cancer, HIV and other infectious diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases – all became theoretical fair game for treatment with RNAi therapeutics.And so, not too long after the discovery of RNAi in 1998 – by Craig Mello and Andrew Fire (who were awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for the discovery) – came the hype. Drugs based on RNAi were said to be the next major class of human therapeutics. Big pharma and small biotech firms alike pumped a flood of money into RNAi-based drug development.The boom phase in RNAi got rolling in 2005 and lasted through about 2008. During that time we saw a bidding war break out for access to potentially gate-keeping RNAi intellectual property and several billion dollars in investments in the space by big pharma. Merck paid $1.1 billion to acquire Sirna Therapeutics, and Roche paid more than $300 million for a limited platform license from Alnylam (arguably the global leader when it comes to RNAi IP). The industry loved the attention, and the media fanned the flames. Consequently, unrealistic expectations set in, and investors fell prey to the mistaken notion that the technical barriers to exploiting RNAi in medicine were relatively low.The industry was in for a wake-up call, however, when the difficulty surrounding RNAi drug delivery came to light. The drugs (comprised of what’s called small interfering RNA, or “siRNA”) break down quickly in the bloodstream; and even if they reach the cells in the body where they are needed, they have trouble entering the cells. Once the mistake of putting IP ahead of enablement was recognized a backlash ensued, and there was a severe crisis of confidence in the potential of RNAi thereapeutics. Novartis ended its five-year partnership with Alnylam in September 2010. Shortly thereafter, Roche, one of the world’s biggest spenders on drug R&D, terminated its RNAi program altogether. Stock prices of companies operating in the space plummeted.Just recently, however, we’ve started to see a comeback in RNAi. The recovery is based not on hype, but on sound science and clinical successes, which should pique investors’ interest. Technical hurdles remain but are being overcome, and companies are advancing drug candidates in the clinic. Alnylam, for example, now has four RNAi drugs in clinical trials and is on pace to have five RNAi therapeutic programs in advanced clinical development by 2015. Together with collaborators at MIT, the company also recently announced the discovery of “core-shell” nanoparticles that have optimal chemical and physical properties for effective, systemic intracellular delivery of RNAi therapeutics. The findings were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. And Alnylam is by no means the only one making advances in the RNAi space.Earlier this year, scientists from MIT, led by Paula Hammond, came up with a novel delivery vehicle in which RNA is packed into microspheres so dense that they withstand degradation until they reach their target. The new system, which was described in the journal Nature Materials in late February, supposedly knocks down expression of specific genes as effectively as existing delivery methods, but with a much smaller dose of particles.Whether RNAi therapeutics can ever live up to the hype they experienced in the early 2000s remains highly uncertain. Perhaps the technical hurdles will ultimately be too much to overcome. Or perhaps a new technology will come along that renders the therapeutics obsolete before they ever make it out of the clinic. [Ed Note: Researchers from the University of Florida have recently created what they call nanozymes, which is a new type of nanoparticle conjugate that mimics RNAi.]Nevertheless, RNAi has the potential to usher in a new order of medicine, the likes of which we’ve only rarely seen. And while investing in the space is highly speculative and requires a lot of due diligence, there is the potential for uncovering a stock that returns several times your initial investment. Good hunting. Bits & BytesHacking Your Hand (Technology Review)Generally speaking, we like to devise things that become extensions of our physical faculties. With hands, we’ve come up with everything from baseball bats to martini glasses to robot surgical machines. But what do we think of a human hand as becoming an extension of a machine? That may not seem like it has any practical applications, like hitting a home run or performing a double bypass. Still, it hasn’t stopped the Japanese from inventing the “PossessedHand,” an apparatus that can actually control your hand for you. What this might say about the creator’s psyche is perhaps best left unexplored.Gmail Mining (Fox News)Do you want Google to play dumpster diver, pawing through your Gmail, looking for commercial tie-ins? Well, as of yesterday, that’s a choice being offered to a million Gmail users (out of 425 million accounts). The bridge Google has constructed between its search engine and email service will mine the correspondence stored within a user’s Gmail account for any data tied to a search request. If that’s too creepy, rest assured that this feature is opt-in only. For now, anyway.How to Land on Mars (SlashGear)The landing of the large exploration vehicle Curiosity on Mars was a grand technological achievement. The article at the link, actually written before touchdown, explains how it would be accomplished. Lots of links, graphics, video. Call it Martian Invasion 101…Facebook Expands Advertising for Mobile (Tech Crunch)Until now, every Facebook mobile ad had to be triggered by your or a friend’s activity, but as of Tuesday Facebook began testing a new non-social ad unit that lets developers buy mobile news-feed ads that open Android and iOS App Store purchase pages when clicked. It’s a move aimed at persuading investors that it’s moving forward with new monetization ideas, but the company will have to tread very carefully to avoid alienating users.last_img read more

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Dear Reader If you hosted a barbeque this past La

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first_imgDear Reader,If you hosted a barbeque this past Labor Day weekend, you probably noticed that food prices are up. A hamburger costs 10.3% more than last year, and a hotdog 6.9% more.But that’s nothing compared to the insane price inflation Casey Research Chief Economist Bud Conrad witnessed at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, a world-famous auto show and auction held in Monterey, California.Below, Bud shares the details of his trip to Monterey, complete with photos and price tags of the most extravagant cars… including this 1963 Ferrari GTO that smashed the record for the most expensive car ever sold at auction. See if you can guess what it sold for before reading:Bud closes by analyzing what this extreme inflation in high-end assets means for investors.Enjoy!Dan SteinhartManaging Editor of The Casey Reportlast_img read more

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In This Issue Dollar recovers losses after FM

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first_imgIn This Issue. * Dollar recovers losses after FMM. * Cyclone hits Australia. * Oil trades in a tight range. * Connection problems for Chuck! And Now. Today’s A Pfennig For Your Thoughts. Greece Makes Its Proposal . Good Day!…And a Happy Friday to one and all! This was a holiday-shortened week, but it still seemed quite long to me, as I kept thinking all day yesterday that it was Friday.. UGH!  The new Polar Vortex has come south.. Can you believe that? Sure it will only last a day, and we’ll have temperatures back to normal in a couple of days, but for today. Well, this is not the weather I signed up for! Oh, quit your complaining, Chuck, back home in St. Louis this stuff goes on and on and on, until you’re at wit’s end.  And besides. It’s a Friday! Time to get everything finished, and get to work on a weekend! I’m experiencing wireless/ internet problems this morning, so this letter may or may not go out on time. UGH!  I guess the shoddy ISP service we get here, can’t stand the cold. The Great George Harrison greets me this morning with his song: While My Guitar Gently Weeps. George Harrison was a very talented guitar player and writer of music. One of my faves.  OK. well, with the internet down, I’m using my iPhone to get news. Gee, that’s fun. NOT!  But from what I can tell the dollar has the conn again, and has recovered all that it lost right after the Fed Meeting Minutes (FMM) on Wednesday. Apparently, it was not enough to get their heads handed to them when they read that the Fed Members were not “all-in” on a rate hike for June, so just wait when we get to June and these same guys get left at the rate hike alter. At least that’s the scenario I’m sticking with, for the economic data continues to disappoint, and print negative in most cases, proving that the economy is not ready for prime time.  And next week we may get a clearer picture of the Fed’s plans, as Fed Chairwoman, Janet Yellen will make the trek up the Hill and give her testimony on the economy to lawmakers. This will be repeated the following day to the other side of the legislation, first the Senate, then the House. I would think that given what we already know from the FMM, that it has a very recognizable dovish slant, that Yellen will do her best to keep everyone guessing. I think she prefers that guessing game with the markets. But we have that looming on the docket for next week. So. Greece made their proposal to receive an extension of 6 months to their original agreement that is to end on the last day of this month.   And as expected Germany lashed out at the proposal. So, that wrangling over a proposal didn’t do the euro any big favors, heading into the weekend. The Eurozone flash PMI’s are printing this morning. Another problem for the euro I do believe, so the euro is trying to do the heavy lifting, and it’s just not working out in the euro’s favor today. And the Swedish krona is getting whacked this morning, as it seems the Riksbank didn’t just like seeing the krona get whacked when they announced negative rates, and sat back to watch the krona drop. Then after sufficiently waiting, the announced the implementation of QE, and sat back again to watch the krona drop more. A couple of days passed, and the krone was attempting to gather some momentum, when the Riksbank decided to give the krona one more shot! Overnight, the Riksbank told the markets that they aren’t finished cutting rates, and then reminded the markets that they don’t have to wait for a scheduled meeting to make a rate cut. Well, needless to say, that pulled the rug from under the krona. And unfortunately, for the Norwegian krone, it’s getting dragged through the mud too. So. my iPhone is a hotspot, which means I should be able to connect to my phone’s wireless server. But. my stupid laptop won’t do that. (I do recall when I was last here in October, telling our IT guys that I had this problem, but then I forgot about it.. until now!) The good news is that my iPad will. but I’m not going to attempt to type out a letter on an iPad. So. I can get some data, not all, but some, and some news but other than that, I’m flying in the dark here. UGH!  The things I must go through. I ask that question to myself or anyone that’s listening all the time.. Why must things be so difficult for me? Ahhh, questions that go unanswered. the stuff that keeps us trying to figure this all out, eh? The Aussie dollar (A$) is flat this morning, so no new negativity toward the A$ overnight. We need to keep our friends in Australia in our thoughts today, as they had Cyclone Marcia hit shore in Queensland overnight. It was a Category 4 going on 5 when it hit. YIKES!   And right behind that cyclone is another. So, things could be getting quite hairy down in Australia. I hope everyone is safe. Alrighty then! We have house guests here and it was a sleepover. and Larry, our guest, had a hotspot that worked on my laptop! YAHOO! I’m back in the saddle again, our where a friend is a friend. the old cowboy.. Gene Autry..  So. here’s the skinny. everything is as I told you above, but the Eurozone flash PMI’s were actually better than expected, but that’s  really not the focus of the markets today. Their focus is all about the Greece situation. And it finally appears to be weighing down the euro. The price of Oil bumped up a buck overnight, so it seems to be in a very tight range, and the petrol currencies bump and grind along with the tight moves. The Russian ruble is a little weaker this morning, but. it appears it will end the week with a weekly gain, the third week in row that the ruble has done that. Interest rates are still very high in Russia, and the currency has responded well to the news of a peace agreement. Maybe, just maybe, cause we never know for sure, but maybe the ruble has turned the corner?  Like I said, we just don’t know. I heard a speaker on the TV yesterday on a business newscast talking emphatically about how the currency pegs that are in place are in no danger of being broken. Hmmm. Isn’t that like a sports team owner given the “vote of confidence’ to his manager, that soon finds out that he’s fired?  I think so. But, we’ll have to wait-n-see how this all plays out, eh? And Gold sure got whacked again yesterday. UGH!  I see that Gold futures are attempting to rebound, but with the pressure that the short paper trades put on Gold, this is getting to be a very difficult thing to live with for me that is.  I see that Germany has repatriated more of its Gold. Good for them!  One thing that I keep focusing on is that the Central Banks (except here in the West) are accumulating Gold, and calling it back so they hold it. There’s smoke there folks. and you know what I always say about how where there’s smoke, there’s fire.  I don’t know what it is these Central Banks are doing, but to me they just keep giving us a warning signal after warning signal. And they’re doing it right out in the open, so everyone can see! The U.S. Data Cupboard is lacking any beef today. the Markit PMI will print. I would look for a grinding down of the index number which last month was 53.9.  Yesterday, the Leading Index number fell from the previous month, but the Initial Jobless Claims were better.. Last week the print for claims rose 25,000 and this week it fell 23,000. So, basically, it’s flat for February. What’s so good about that? Well.. it’s time to go to the Big Finish. I know this isn’t my best effort today, but I really did what I could with what I had at the time. For What’s It’s Worth. Well, since I’m running so far behind in time this morning, I cheated and just went to Ed Steer’s letter to find this. the whole article can be read here: http://sputniknews.com/business/20150213/1018240631.html “Almost 91 domestic credit institutions have been incorporated into the new Russian financial system, the analogous of SWIFT, an international banking network. The new service, will allow Russian banks to communicate seamlessly through the Central Bank of Russia. It should be noted that Russia’s Central Bank initiated the development of the country’s own messaging system in response to repeated threats voiced by Moscow’s Western partners to disconnect Russia from SWIFT. Chuck again. yes, I talked about this a few months ago, and how the Russians were going about getting around the U.S. blocking their ability to use SWIFT.  It’s all a part of the de-dollarization Almost 91 domestic credit institutions have been incorporated into the new Russian financial system, the analogous of SWIFT, an international banking network. The new service, will allow Russian banks to communicate seamlessly through the Central Bank of Russia. It should be noted that Russia’s Central Bank initiated the development of the country’s own messaging system in response to repeated threats voiced by Moscow’s Western partners to disconnect Russia from SWIFT. Chuck again.. yes, I talked about this a few months ago, about how Russia was going to get around the U.S. blocking Russia’s ability to use SWIFT. It’s all about their de-dollarization that’s been going on, folks. To recap. Chuck’s internet connection is down and he’s flying in the dark. Germany balks at Greece’s proposal to extend the current agreement 6 months. and it weighs on the euro. Eurozone flash PMI’s print better than expected. Oil trades in a tight range, and the ruble ends the week with 3 weeks gained. Gold got whacked again, and Russia starts its own SWIFT system. Currencies today 2/20/15. American Style: A$ .7850, kiwi .7555, C$ .8030, euro 1.1305, sterling 1.5380, Swiss $1.0540, . European Style: rand 11.6470, krone 7.6050, SEK 8.4285, forint 270.25, zloty 3.6970, koruna 24.3400, RUB 62.06, yen 118.55, sing 1.3590, HKD 7.7565, INR 62.09, China 6.1330, pesos 15.07, BRL 2.8695, Dollar Index 94.60, Oil $51.91, 10-year 2.10%, Silver $16.55, Platinum $1,162.13, Palladium $782.50, and Gold. $1,213.02 That’s it for today. Having people here talking while I’m writing is different for me. I usually only hear the songs on the iPod, which right now is playing 10cc: The Things We Do For Love. I guess which would have been a good song last weekend, eh?   I didn’t make it to the ball fields yesterday, and it got really cold overnight here, so I guess I’ll have to wait until tomorrow. I was surprised I didn’t receive any nice or not so nice comments about my wish for when I grow old that I wrote about yesterday. No biggie, just thought it would.  Well, it’s the 20th of February, only another week until March. and you know what March brings, right?  Spring training games. I have my seats I have my parking passes, I am all set to watch my beloved Cardinals play baseball at Roger Dean Stadium!   Well, no 3-day weekend until the end of May, so. hunker down and work diligently, and it’ll be here before you know it!   And with that, it’s time to get off the bus, and get this out the door. I hope you have a Fantastico Friday! Chuck Butler Managing Director EverBank Global Marketslast_img read more

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A local organization helping people pay for spayin

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first_imgA local organization helping people pay for spaying or neutering their pets is celebrating its fourth anniversary this weekend with a fundraiser.Cans for Kritters is offering a fun-filled event at Riverside Feed and Seed in Northport 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. The organization helps raise money by collecting cans and monetary donations to ensure people who need their animals spayed or neutered can get those services.All money raised at the event will go toward a new transport vehicle for the organization, said Darlene Richardson.“We desperately need a new van to put the animals in and be able to do more, because the more room we have the more we can do,” Richardson said.last_img

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By Vasilis Papoutsis LOS ANGELES CA – The Univers

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first_imgBy Vasilis PapoutsisLOS ANGELES, CA – The University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Women’s Gymnastics team has won the NCAA Champaign Regional, a competition that coach Valorie Kondos Field considers ”the most stressful meet of the year” and is now preparing for the NCAA Championships in St. Louis are set to begin April 14.Her teams have won six National Championships and despite the low scoring at the Regional, Field believes that if they have a great meet at the finals, they still have a chance to win.LIFELONG PASSIONField’s impressive career as UCLA’s women’s gymnastics coach has exceeded a lot of people’s expectations, including her own. As a young girl she suffered from scoliosis, a condition of the spine in which the backbone curves to the side. Doctors recommended dancing as a way to strengthen the back muscles and she began taking ballet lessons at age 7.She grew up in Sacramento to parents Gregory Kondos, an accomplished landscape painter, and Rosie Thalas, a hairdresser. Rosie was the Lodi Festival queen when her future husband first noticed her and decided to pursue her. “My father was like a Greek Picasso, very talented and very charming but also very volatile as many artists are. My mother was a saint,” Field said.Along with her ballet lessons, Field also took piano lessons and practiced Greek folk dancing at the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church in Sacramento. Her piano lessons paid off when she got a summer job at age 16 playing piano for floor exercises at Agilities in Carmichael, CA. “While I was playing the piano I could not stop talking and giving instructions to the athletes and eventually I became a dance coach,” she said. When she graduated high school her father told her to either go to college full time or work as a dancer full time, but not do both. “My father encouraged me to live my life large and follow my dreams,” she said.She decided to pursue dancing and worked as a professional dancer with the Sacramento Ballet, and Capital City Ballet in Washington DC. In 1983 she was hired as a choreographer and assistant coach for the women’s gymnastics team. When in 1991 UCLA Athletic Director Dr. Judy Holland appointed Field in the head coaching position, the disapproval of the gymnastics world was loud and clear. To hire a choreographer as a gymnastics head coach was an unorthodox move. Field had her own doubts: “I was not sure if I could be successful. I told them I will take the job for a year until they find a more qualified candidate. And on that premise, I accepted the position.”WOODEN’S INFLUENCEDespite all her efforts, the second year the team finished in a worse position than in the first. Field was deeply disappointed and decided that it was time to quit. “I was not succeeding as a coach and I was walking to the athletic director’s office to resign. On my way there I stopped by the store and while walking around I glanced at [renowned UCLA basketball coach John] Wooden’s book A Lifetime of Observations and Reflections on and off the Court and started reading it.” At that moment, she decided to go back to her office and kept reading. While reconsidering her decision to quit, “I began asking myself what qualities do I bring to the job? I realized that a lot of the traits that I had developed as a ballet dancer can be applied to the field of gymnastics as well,” she said. That was the turning point. She did not quit but she “stopped mimicking other coaches and decided to follow my instincts and be myself.” Success soon followed and after winning a couple of Pacific-12 championships in 1997, she won her first NCAA National Championship. In 1998, she, along with her husband, UCLA Associate Athletic Director Bobby Field, invited Coach Wooden to their home for dinner even though they had never met him before. The coach accepted and he and Field clicked immediately. As Humphrey Bogart famously said in Casablanca “it was the beginning of a beautiful friendship” that lasted for many years.Wooden was not only Field’s mentor and beloved friend, but he also attended meets on a regular basis even at age 95 when he did not have a ride, he drove himself to Westwood for a meet because he wanted to keep his promise.Today, Valorie Kondos-Field is the most decorated coach in women gymnastics. In addition to six national NCAA titles, her teams have won 13 Pac -12 championships. She has been awarded National Coach of the Year honors 4 times and been Pac -12 Coach of the Year 5 times. She also had the distinct honor to be named Pac -12 Coach of the Century.The most important factor in her success? “Discipline. Confidence and attention to detail are also very important but discipline is on the top of the list. The pain of discipline is never as great as the pain of regret.”She mostly embraces Wooden’s “confidence and steady demeanor. He never had to ‘switch’ to his coaching personality. He was always himself. He was funny, polite and respectful, he was never mean or insulting.”MISS VALField, who is affectionately called “Miss Val”is well known for her nurturing personality, a trait she inherited from her Greek mother. Stella Savvidou, who joined the team in 2016 after graduating high school in Australia and competing for the Cyprus National Team, wanted to attend an American university with a great gymnastics program that would also be a great academic school. Savvidou, who had three offers from other universities including Yale, turned them down once she met UCLA’s coach. “After meeting Coach Val I knew I wanted to come to UCLA. She was a caring and loving person, she touched my heart.” Her mother, Chrysanthi, added to the coach’s praises.“Once I met Coach Val, the choice was obvious. We felt that anytime in the sphere of Valorie’s influence would be invaluable. Everything that has happened since only strengthen our conviction.”Most coaches emphasize winning at all costs. Field loves winning too, but she puts emphasis on effort above all. “If we perform the best we can and don’t win on a particular day I am okay with that.If we don’t put our best effort forward then I have a problem with that.” Her ballet background has contributed to craft floor routines that excite audiences. At a recent meet at Pauley Pavilion more than 12,000 people showed up. UCLA women gymnastics is also a hit in social media as they have the largest social media in the all women collegiate sports ranking No.1 on both Instagram and Twitter. “We have the most entertaining floor routines. They evolve as the season progresses,”said Savvidou, who has a ballet background as well.CHAMP OFF THE COURT TOOField is also a champion off the court. When she got the call from her doctor that she had been diagnosed with breast cancer, she pulled off the freeway and started thinking of what will come next. “I heard a voice in my head saying to be anxious for nothing and grateful for everything. God was speaking to me, telling me to fight.“Breast cancer changed my life for the better in every way possible. I knew that if I did the treatment and kept a positive attitude I would have the chance to overcome it, so I switched my attitude completely. I was grateful that I had the ‘opportunity’ to do chemotherapy so I said to myself and others that I get to have chemo, not that I have to have chemo.” Field called the medical facility she received chemotherapy a “chemo spa” because the word spa implies pampering. And she conveys this message to the attendees of her speeches time and time again.Field is in the process of writing her first book, Choreograph Your Life. “People kept asking me ‘where can I buy your book?’ I decided to write one, I want to help people empower themselves.” Field was inducted into the UCLA Athletics Hall of Fame in 2010. Wooden was there. “When I received the induction letter I thought to myself, maybe I am a good coach now.” Moderation aside, Field is not just a good coach, she has attained legendary status in women gymnastics. Even the great John Wooden would agree.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

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What to watch in the leading soccer competitions i

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first_imgWhat to watch in the leading soccer competitions in Europe this weekend:___ENGLANDAfter playing three games each inside 10 days, the Premier League teams are straight back in action as they enter the FA Cup.The third round opens on Friday night with a Merseyside derby and Manchester United taking on second-tier Derby. Liverpool hosts Everton with Philippe Coutinho ruled out through injury, just as he is linked with a January transfer window move to Barcelona.Jamie Vardy could be denied a fairytale return with Leicester to third-tier Fleetwood on Saturday due to a groin injury. The England striker joined from the then non-league club in 2012 and went to score the goals that powered Leicester to its shock Premier League title in 2016.Premier League leader Manchester City, which is pursuing a quadruple, hosts Burnley on Saturday when 2017 league champion Chelsea goes to Norwich. Arsenal’s cup defense opens Sunday at second-tier Nottingham Forest. AFC Wimbledon faces Tottenham at Wembley 30 years after shocking Liverpool to win the 1988 final in the old stadium.The third round ends on Monday with Brighton hosting Premier League rival Crystal Palace.— By Rob Harris in London.___SPAINAtletico Madrid resumes its chase of leader Barcelona, assisted by the successful return of Diego Costa. The former Chelsea striker’s second debut was delayed by Atletico’s transfer ban, but after missing the first half of the season he scored on his return to action on Wednesday against Lleida in the Copa del Rey. Costa is expected to start when Diego Simeone’s team hosts Getafe in the league on Saturday.Atletico is nine points behind Barcelona, which hosts Levante on Sunday. Third-place Valencia, 11 points off the lead, hosts Girona on Saturday, while fourth-place Real Madrid is at Celta Vigo on Sunday. Madrid, the defending champion, is 14 points behind Barcelona with a game in hand.— By Tales Azzoni in Madrid.___ITALYMassimiliano Allegri faces the team he established his coaching career with when Juventus visits Cagliari on Saturday. In 2008-09, Allegri guided Cagliari to ninth place, the Sardinian club’s best Serie A result in nearly 15 years.Allegri joined AC Milan in 2010 and won the league during his first season at the San Siro. Since moving to Juventus in 2014, he has won three straight titles.Second-place Juventus enters on a six-match unbeaten streak, while Cagliari is struggling in 15th place, five points above the relegation zone.Leader Napoli begins the second half of the season by hosting Hellas Verona, which is second from the bottom. Perhaps the best matchup of the weekend features fourth-place Roma against Atalanta, which just eliminated Napoli from the Italian Cup. New Torino coach Walter Mazzarri — who replaced the fired Sinisa Mihajlovic on Thursday — makes his debut against Bologna.— By Andrew Dampf in Rome.___FRANCEParis Saint-Germain starts its bid to win a fourth consecutive French Cup with a trip to Rennes on Sunday.PSG traveled to the Brittany side before the winter break and secured a comfortable 4-1 league win on the back of a solid performance from Neymar, who scored twice and turned provider for Kylian Mbappe and striker Edinson Cavani.With a nine-point lead at the top of the French league standings, PSG remains on course for an unprecedented quadruple. Unai Emery’s side has qualified for the knockout stage of the Champions League and is involved in both domestic cups.PSG’s short trip to Rennes is one of three matches between topflight clubs. Strasbourg hosts Dijon and Nice visits Toulouse in the round of 64.— By Samuel Petrequin in Paris.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

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THESSALONIKI AP — The eagerly awaited derby betw

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first_imgTHESSALONIKI (AP) — The eagerly awaited derby between Greek league leader PAOK and defending champion Olympiakos at PAOK’s Toumba Stadium never got underway Sunday, after Olympiakos coach Oscar Garcia was sent to hospital after being hit in the face by a cash register paper roll.While they did not dispute the hit, PAOK officials said Olympiakos exaggerated the impact in an attempt to have PAOK, which is six points ahead of Olympiakos, face punishment and possible point deduction.“This is a shadow play, a strategy that Olympiakos started implementing even ahead of the game, fantasizing about (incidents) in its friendly media,” said PAOK communications chief Kyriakos Kyriakos. “Just this morning, they warned us that they would leave the pitch at the slightest incident.”The roll appeared to be thrown from the VIP stands as the teams came out before the game started.Garcia was rushed to a hospital, but the teams stayed in the stadium for nearly three hours before they were told the game was off.The private clinic where Garcia was taken issued a statement about five hours after the coach was admitted, saying his upper left lip was swollen and skin on the inside of his mouth was injured.“He has sensitivity in the jaw, neck pain, dizziness and nausea,” the clinic statement says.Garcia was scheduled to stay at the hospital overnight.[captiPhoto by ΜΟΤΙΟΝ ΤΕΑΜ.Witnesses claimed the roll had already unfolded when it reached Garcia.No away fans were allowed at the game and PAOK supporters were unusually well-behaved ahead of kickoff. The often seen spectacle of flares creating a wall of thick smoke was absent. Instead, home fans greeted their team throwing pieces of torn paper, like confetti — and the cash register paper roll.There was one incident outside the arena, as police dispersed about a thousand fans with tear gas, but otherwise the nearly 30,000-seat arena was evacuated without incident.Olympiakos is required to get a diagnosis from a public hospital, not the private clinic Garcia is currently in.Olympiakos also faces a deduction of three points for fan behavior last month. The club has already been deducted those points, but is appealing the sentence. Pending appeal, the standings do not reflect the sentence. A loss of those three points and with eight rounds remaining would essentially scuttle Olympiakos’ hopes for a 20th league title in 22 seasons. But sanctions against PAOK, together with a successful appeal, would complicate the odds.Second-place AEK Athens, which lies two points behind PAOK and plays at fourth-place Atromitos Monday could take over the league lead with a win.___By COSTAS KANTOURIS and DEMETRIS NELLAS , Associated PressNellas reported from Athens, GreecePhoto by ΜΟΤΙΟΝ ΤΕΑΜ.Photo by LATO KLODIAN / EUROKINISSI)Photo by LATO KLODIAN / EUROKINISSI)Photo by LATO KLODIAN / EUROKINISSI)Photo by LATO KLODIAN / EUROKINISSI)on id=”attachment_191827″ align=”aligncenter” width=”750″] Photo by ΜΟΤΙΟΝ ΤΕΑΜ.[/caption]Photo by LATO KLODIAN / EUROKINISSIPhoto by ΜΟΤΙΟΝ ΤΕΑΜ.Photo by ΜΟΤΙΟΝ ΤΕΑΜ.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

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Welcome to Invisibilia Season 4 The NPR program a

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first_imgWelcome to Invisibilia Season 4! The NPR program and podcast explores the invisible forces that shape human behavior, and we here at Shots are joining in to probe the science of why we act the way we do. In Episode 4, they’re asking: are we destined to repeat our patterns or do we generally stray in surprising directions? – a question increasingly relevant in an age when algorithms are trying to predict everything about our behavior. Here’s an excerpt from the episode.On paper, Shon Hopwood’s life doesn’t make a lot of sense, not even to him.”I don’t have a great excuse as to why I did these things. And everybody always wants that,” he tells me. “It closes the circle for people. But that’s not really how it happened.”To the naked eye, it looked like Shon Hopwood was born into a really good pattern. He grew up in the neighborly, low-crime community of David City, Neb., to a great Christian family that encouraged self-reliance. “My parents basically opened the door in the morning and would say, ‘See you in a few hours.’ It was a good childhood.”Fresh air, loving family, safe community: Those are some pretty good patterns.But for some reason, in college, Hopwood started veering off the graph. He wasn’t that interested in school, so he dropped out and returned to David City to work, and that was all going fine, until one day when his friend Tom asked him down to the bar for a drink.”And he just asked me, he said, ‘What do you think about robbing a bank?,’ ” Hopwood says.”And you know most people would have said, ‘No!’ Or ‘What are you talking about?’ Or walked away, or a million other responses. And my response was, ‘Yes! This is a great idea!’ “And so Hopwood’s path forked. He would become a bank robber.Of course Hopwood had second thoughts. He had them right up to the moment he walked into the bank dressed as a handyman. “I walk in the bank and I pull a mask up and I drop the tool box on the ground. It makes a huge noise so everyone turns and looks at me. And I unzip my coveralls, pull out a 22[-caliber] rifle and yell, ‘Everyone get down. This is a robbery!’ “After that Hopwood recruited a small group of friends and just hit one bank after another until one day, four guys from the FBI tackled him. He was sentenced to 12 years in prison, which was bad enough, but what really cut was that a bunch of people in his hometown disowned his completely blameless parents.”They have to have some reason for why I did these things, because otherwise it just doesn’t compute. Because it didn’t make any sense that me and the people that were involved with me had robbed these banks. I mean one of my co-defendants was the son of the town attorney,” he says.We need to find a predictable pattern, and when it eludes us, we ache for it.Now, because we live in the age of computers, our ability to discern patterns has expanded. Today a computer can scan more data in a minute than you or I could sift in a lifetime, and in that data see things we could never see. Beautiful things and horrible things and even — we’re told — the future.A competition to find the patterns that determine the path of a human lifeAbout two years ago a Princeton sociologist named Matthew Salganik decided to stage a massive computer competition.The idea was inspired by Netflix. In 2006, the company distributed huge amounts of user data to programmers all over the world so they could write computer models that found hidden patterns that improved its predictions for which movies subscribers would like. The competition totally worked out for Netflix. The companies movie choice predictions substantially improved.So Salganik’s plan was to do the exact same thing, except instead of staging a competition to improve predictions of movie preference, he wanted the competition to improve predictions about the things sociologists cared about: high school GPA, which child would persevere when faced with adversity, who would become homeless. Could we, he wondered, harness the pattern-finding abilities of computers to discover new things about how individual lives turned out?”Looking at lots of people and looking at broader patterns helps us have a fuller understanding of what’s possible,” Salganik says. If his competition worked well, it could make the world a better place. After all, if computers could locate the things that predicted stuff like higher grades, policy makers could design better interventions.So Salganik set to work. He got a massive trove of data on 5,000 kids who had been followed from the day they were born, then made that information available to data geeks and researchers across the globe. Four hundred teams were given incredibly detailed information about the kids from birth until age nine, then told to predict their grades — and a handful of other outcomes — at age 15.One day last fall, Salganik sat down to crunch the numbers, figure out which models were best able to predict where the children in the study had ended up, and what he found deeply surprised him.What Salganik wanted to see was at least one computer model entry able to predict with reasonable accuracy the outcomes of each child in the study.But none of the computer models did as well as Salganik expected.If they had, the screen in front of him would have been filled with tall, colorful towers — bars stretching from the floor of the y-axis to the top, indicating that the predictions had gotten close to 100 percent accurate. Instead what he saw was a bunch of squat bars crowded around the bottom like flattened mushrooms, indicating that the predictions were a lot closer to 0 percent accurate than 100 percent.”I would say this is not impressive,” he tells me as he looks at the graph. “I think this is sad. Disappointing.”But was it? Or was it just an accurate representation of how unpredictable our individual lives are?Duncan Watts works at Microsoft Research. He does computational social science, including prediction studies similar to the one that Salganik was doing. In fact over the years, Watts says, he’s done tons. He says when it comes to predicting stuff like what will happen in a particular human life, Watts thinks the outcome that Salganik found is just the outcome.”We find exactly the same pattern everywhere we look… when you’re talking about individual outcomes, there’s a lot of randomness,” Watts says.”And the other half of this conversation is that people don’t like that answer, and so they keep wanting a different answer. They say nature abhors a vacuum. Humans abhor randomness. We like deterministic stories,” Duncan says.We like the idea that patterns can tell us what will happen in life because that idea makes us feel more secure he says.”If you think you can predict things— even if you’re wrong — it means that you get up in the morning and you feel confident,” Watts says. “And so you can invest your time and energy today in things that won’t pay off until tomorrow.”Watts believes being more realistic about patterns is important but hard to pull off because it involves accepting something that feels like a contradiction: that patterns are important and predictive — you can identify things in the lives of kids that tend to help or hurt them — but you can’t say for sure whether those same things would influence the life of any individual kid because randomness has a lot more power over complex things like life than we like to think.Randomness, Watts says, is as important as pattern, though obviously it doesn’t get the same respect in our algorithmic world.A life that no one could predict turns againWhich brings us back to the unusual trajectory of Shon Hopwood.Hopwood was working in the prison law library, checking out books, when a fellow prisoner asked him for help with his case. The guy wanted help to draft a petition the U.S. Supreme Court.Hopwood had never studied law and only had a high school education but he wanted to be helpful so he spent two months working on an argument, then sent off the petition and basically forgot about it.”Then one day I’m walking out to the recreation yard at 6:30,” Hopwood says, “and a friend of mine comes running and screaming out of the housing unit. And this being federal prison my first thought is, ‘What did I say to this guy yesterday that he wants to come and fight me at 6:30 in the morning?’ “The Supreme Court had accepted the appeal he had written.That highly unusual event led to other unusual turns in trajectory, until one fine day, Hopwood found himself moving a box of belongings into a small office at Georgetown University Law School.The bank robber had become a law professor.Proof that even though we yearn for predictable patterns, no matter how many computers we have, it might just be impossible to predict where any single life will go. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

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Dr Nick Nelson walks through busy Highland Hospit

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first_imgDr. Nick Nelson walks through busy Highland Hospital in Oakland, Calif., to a sixth-floor exam room, where he sees patients from around the world who say they have fled torture and violence.Nelson, who practices internal medicine, is the medical director of the Highland Human Rights Clinic, part of the Alameda County health system. A few times each week, he and his team conduct medical evaluations of people who are seeking asylum in the United States.The doctors listen to the patients’ stories. They search for signs of trauma. They scrutinize injuries, including electrocution scars, bullet wounds and unset broken bones.As the Trump administration looks to reduce the number of applicants for asylum, citing loopholes and fraudulent claims, this clinic — and others like it in San Diego, Los Angeles, New York and Chicago — seeks evidence that can help determine whether someone should gain asylum in the U.S.The Highland clinic opened in 2001 as a place for asylum-seekers and refugees to get care. Five years later, the staff started offering forensic exams that aim to discern whether there is evidence of torture or abuse. Nelson, who took over as director in 2012, says his team does between 80 and 120 evaluations each year.Nelson and his colleagues diagnose physical and psychological ailments and, in many cases, substantiate these patients’ claims about how they were hurt.Sometimes the asylum-seekers have health coverage that pays for the exams, but the county covers the cost for those who don’t.”Our job is to make sure that the asylum office understands all the medical and psychological facts about a person’s case so that they can make a decision,” Nelson says.He bases his findings on an internationally recognized protocol for torture documentation.Sometimes, Nelson says, attorneys ask him to answer specific questions, such as, “Is this burn scar consistent with a cigarette burn?” or “Are these marks on his back consistent with being beaten with PVC pipe?”Nelson has had some medical training on what to expect to see in cases of torture. He also applies his general expertise as a doctor in knowing how to interview and examine patients, and has learned something about the countries these asylum-seekers are fleeing and the injuries they may have endured.For example, when someone is hit with a long, stiff object, it produces a pair of parallel bruises like railroad tracks, he says.”That’s a specific thing that I didn’t learn in medical school or residency,” he says, “but that I have learned through taking care of a lot of people who have been tortured.”In most cases, Nelson says, he finds evidence to support the stories his patients tell him. But there are also exams that don’t yield definitive evidence.Nelson also addresses the asylum seekers’ health needs, sometimes finding cases of tuberculosis or HIV that previously had gone undiagnosed. Nearly all of the patients he sees need mental health referrals, he says, because of years of torture or abuse in their native countries.One of the patients Nelson recently treated is 60-year-old Juan Lopez Aguilar, a Maya man who fled Guatemala three years ago, saying he and been beaten and threatened off and on for nearly four decades because of his ethnicity. He feared for his life back home. Lopez Aguilar’s son also was murdered in 2005 and his daughter fled because of threats, his attorney says.”I’m worried,” Lopez Aguilar tells the doctor through a translator, as he sits in the exam room. “There are a lot of gangs. They want to kill people in my community.”Nelson first examined and interviewed Lopez Aguilar earlier this spring and wrote a report corroborating the man’s account for his asylum case. The legal case was first presented in 2015 but not formally filed until last year.Lopez Aguilar, who grew up in a family of peasant farmers, tells Nelson that his community was attacked by soldiers when he was in his 20s and that his father was killed during that attack. Lopez Aguilar moved to another part of Guatemala, where he continued to be the victim of “race-based harassment, extortion and threats,” Nelson says.The man’s story echoes those of other clinic patients, Nelson says, and violence and discrimination against indigenous Mayan-speaking Guatemalans is common.Lopez Aguilar, who has worked as a dishwasher, has now returned to the clinic for a regular medical visit. He tells the doctor in his native language that he has been having severe headaches and dizziness since soon after he arrived in the U.S.His wife and some of his children are back in Guatemala, he explains, and he can’t petition to bring his wife to the States unless and until he is granted asylum. That won’t be before 2020, when his court date is scheduled.Men like Lopez Aguilar have faced increasingly tough odds since early June, when U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that gang violence and domestic abuse would no longer be considered grounds for granting asylum.To be eligible for asylum, applicants must prove they face physical violence, or fear it, based on factors such as race, ethnicity or religion.Even before the Trump administration’s recent crackdown, getting asylum was a difficult and time-consuming proposition. In 2017, only about 38 percent of asylum seekers in the U.S. were granted that status by the immigration court, according to data from the nonpartisan Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse at Syracuse University.The harsher federal policies, including detentions at the border, have generated anxiety and uncertainty among those seeking asylum and their advocates and immigration lawyers.”Every day is a roller coaster,” says Oakland attorney Haregu Gaime, who frequently refers her clients to the Highland clinic.Niloufar Khonsari, executive director of Pangea Legal Services, a Bay Area legal advocacy group, says the obstacles won’t deter people from seeking a safe place to live or from seeking judicial help to stay in the U.S.When applicants are examined at the Highland clinic, Khonsari says, it “definitely makes a difference for judges.”Gaime says the clinic’s reports frequently help corroborate her clients’ experiences in a way that their testimony alone cannot.”Sometimes a traumatized person is not able to relay what happened to them in a way that tells the full story,” she says.Ira Mehlman, spokesman for the Federation for American Immigration Reform, which favors stricter controls on immigration, notes that there are limits to a doctor’s ability to interpret these cases. Doctors may be able to determine if somebody suffered an injury, he says, but not necessarily the circumstances that led to it. “And they can’t determine if it was because of political persecution,” he says.Mehlman says there is no question that there is violence in Central America and that gangs are rampant, but the U.S. can’t accept everyone who is danger.On the same morning that Nelson sees Lopez Aguilar at Highland clinic, he also examines Gebremeskl Tefamicael, an asylum seeker from Eritrea. Nelson takes notes as he listens to Tefamicael’s story of being conscripted into the military, then imprisoned and tortured.Nelson asks Tefamicael exactly what his tormentors used to tie him up.It was a rope made from tree bark, the patient responds, as Nelson writes in his notebook a description of the scars on Tefamicael’s wrists.Afterward, Nelson’s report for the court states that Tefamicael’s physical scars and psychological state are consistent with the man’s description of what happened to him.Nelson says he got involved with the clinic because he wanted to treat people who were underserved. People fleeing their countries and seeking asylum here are “definitely one of the more needy, underserved and generally marginalized” communities, he says.Often, Nelson doesn’t hear until months or years later whether his patients have been granted asylum. But when the request is approved, he says, he sees a tremendous change in them.Getting asylum doesn’t take away the trauma, but it relieves these people of the fear of returning to a country where they are not safe, Nelson says.”When someone who has got a real basis for an asylum claim gets granted, and you were part of demonstrating why that should be the case,” he says, “that feels really good.”Kaiser Health News, a nonprofit news service, is an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, and not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Anna Gorman is a senior correspondent at KHN, and based in Los Angeles. Copyright 2018 Kaiser Health News. To see more, visit Kaiser Health News.last_img read more

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In 1983 Utah was the first state to lower its blo

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first_imgIn 1983, Utah was the first state to lower its blood alcohol limit from 0.10 to 0.08 for impaired driving. It would take nearly two decades for every state to follow suit, but as they did, the nation’s rate of alcohol-related traffic deaths dropped 10 percent. Now, Utah is pioneering the move to lower it once again. Beginning Dec. 30 — yes, the day before New Year’s Eve — Utahns will have to be extra careful about drinking and driving. On Sunday, the state’s blood alcohol content limit will drop from 0.08 percent to 0.05 percent, marking the strictest DUI law in the country.To give you an idea of the difference in consumption, for a man weighing 180 pounds, it takes about four drinks to reach a BAC of 0.08 percent, according to the American Beverage Institute. But to reach .05, it’s about half as many drinks and can be even fewer for women.Utah law limits the type of and strength of alcohol depending on where it is purchased, with different limits on beer and heavy beer.Still, the current limit of .08 is “a significant amount of drinking” for a lot of people, says Utah state Rep. Norm Thurston, a Republican.Thurston sponsored the bill to lower the limit in 2017 at the request of the National Transportation Safety Board, which has been urging states to lower DUI limits to 0.05 since 2013.Thurston says he believes the new limit will save lives because it sends a strict message to anyone who has been drinking not to get behind the wheel. “You would think that we’re already there as a society,” but Thurston says he meets a lot of people who say they think it’s safe to drink and drive, “just a little bit.”Critics slammed the Republican, a practicing member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, for running the bill. The church urges its members not to consume alcohol, and many accused him, as a Mormon, of trying to legislate drinkers and non-Mormons.The American Beverage Institute, an alcohol trade organization, has been a vocal critic of the law. Spokesman Jackson Shedelbower says he doesn’t believe the change will save lives. The lower limit targets social, moderate drinkers, not “legitimately drunk drivers,” he says.”Nearly 70 percent of alcohol-related fatalities in this country are caused by someone with … a BAC of 0.15 and above,” Shedlbower says, three times the new limit in Utah.So, will drunken driving arrests in Utah increase starting Dec. 30? Probably not, says Sgt. Nick Street with the Utah Highway Patrol.”Troopers and officers throughout the state should already be arresting based on impairment, not based on a per se limit, and that standard is not going to change,” he says.Street says he believes the law has already changed drivers’ behaviors, even though it hasn’t taken effect yet.”I think people are making better decisions on the front end of a night,” by using ride-hailing apps or choosing designated drivers. Copyright 2018 KUER 90.1. To see more, visit KUER 90.1.last_img read more

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Science has some bad news for the bearded young c

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first_imgScience has some bad news for the bearded: young children think you’re really, really unattractive.A new study suggests that, until they reach puberty, kids are strongly anti-beard — although children with bearded fathers did feel more warmly toward facial hair.Scientists going all the way back to Charles Darwin have pondered the purpose of beards. Darwin, who spent his later years sporting a large, bushy beard, thought beards had somehow helped men charm the opposite sex.”Until very recent history, beards were a very prominent element of men’s faces, and so we must have expectations related to those, and it turns out that adults do,” says Nicole Nelson, a researcher at the University of Queensland in Australia who studies face perception.Actual scientific research on beards is, regrettably, scant. But Nelson says that over the last decade or so, work pioneered by her colleague Barnaby Dixson has shown that beards make men look older, stronger and more masculine — at least, to adults.”And so we were wondering whether or not all of those expectations emerge in adulthood or if they are there throughout our lives,” says Nelson.Her team tested this in 470 kids, from toddlers to teenagers. Researchers had kids look at a series of paired photos. Each pair showed a man with a beard and the same man clean-shaven, presented side-by-side.”Then we just ask kids, ‘Which man looks stronger?’ ‘Which man looks older?’ ‘Which man looks best?'” explains Nelson.Even little kids associated beards with being older and stronger. But when asked which face looked “best,” young kids overwhelmingly avoided bearded men.”As early as 1 year 9 months, they dislike beards,” says Nelson, “and kids, as they got older, up to about 13 years, continue to dislike beards even more.”Interestingly, around the age of puberty, young peoples’ views changed. “Kids all of a sudden had a jump in beard preferences,” says Nelson. They started to like beards more and judged them more like adults do.”So it seems like probably other people’s faces mean different things to children depending on where they are developmentally,” she explains.And personal experience seems to count, too — because “having a bearded father was associated with positive judgements of bearded faces,” according to the researchers’ report in the journal Evolution and Human Behavior.Nelson says that she and her colleagues have been doing additional studies of how children perceive bearded men. In one, kids engage with a story that involves a magical island and a series of challenges. Children tended to pick bearded men to help them with feats involving strength, such as fighting a dragon or moving a large stone. But for tasks that involved trustworthiness, like hiding a treasure map, children preferred a smooth-faced partner.”The understanding that beards are linked to strength is there very early, but they don’t seem to trust beards at all,” says Nelson.Research shows that beards seem to enhance observers’ ability to recognize facial expressions associated with anger, but not other emotions. Beards did not seem to offer any competitive advantage in mixed martial arts fighting, however, suggesting that beards might offer “dishonest signals of formidability.”Other studies of beards suggest that women, especially women with children, may perceive bearded men as better potential fathers.So the decision of whether or not to grow a beard means weighing the various pros and cons, says Nelson.”I think it’s a good move if you want to kind of boost your manliness — if you want to look a little more dominant, you want to look a little bit older,” she says. “Those things come along with children being slightly afraid of you. If you want to chat with children, you might not want a beard.” Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

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Last updated on July 2nd 2019 at 0908 amWisconsi

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first_imgLast updated on July 2nd, 2019 at 09:08 amWisconsin added 8,900 private sector jobs in March, according to seasonally adjusted preliminary data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics released today by the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development.The unemployment rate held steady at a record low 2.9 percent. When it dipped below 3 percent in February, it was the first time the state’s seasonally adjusted jobless rate had done so since data collection began in 1976. Wisconsin’s unemployment rate is well below the national rate of 4.1 percent. The state’s labor force participation rate also increased by 0.1 percent in March, and the civilian labor force grew to 3.2 million.The state added 2,300 construction jobs, 2,100 manufacturing jobs and 2,800 professional and business services jobs in March, according to the preliminary data.The previously reported job data from February, which showed the state had lost 300 private sector jobs that month, was revised upward dramatically—the state actually gained 3,700 private sector jobs in February, according to the revised data.On the public sector side, the state lost 2,100 government jobs in March.The state is off to a strong start to the year in private sector job growth, according to BLS data released by the DWD. The state added 7,100 private sector jobs in January, 3,700 in February and 8,900 in March, for a total of 19,700 private sector jobs for the first quarter of the year.“Wisconsin’s working families, employees and communities are benefiting as Wisconsin’s labor market economy sets new records across numerous measurements,” said Ray Allen, DWD secretary, in a statement. “Our unemployment rate remains at a record low of 2.9 percent, the number of people employed is at a record high and our civilian labor force is larger than ever before in our state’s history. Under Governor (Scott) Walker’s leadership, Wisconsin’s strong alignment between workforce, education and economic development partners will enable Wisconsin to attract, train and retain even more workers through an all-hands-on-deck approach that draws talent from outside the state and helps those already here skill up and skill in to good-paying opportunities.”Read more economic data reports at the BizTracker page. Get our email updatesBizTimes DailyManufacturing WeeklyNonprofit WeeklyReal Estate WeeklySaturday Top 10Wisconsin Morning Headlines Subscribelast_img read more

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Rendering of The New StateLast updated on July 3r

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first_imgRendering of The New State.Last updated on July 3rd, 2019 at 07:11 pmThe historic State Theater in Milwaukee’s SOHI District could be reopened for the first time in nearly two decades as an all-ages music club.The project, called The New State, would also be a combination of non- and for-profit businesses, sharing and collaborating in the space at 2612 W. State St. Rendering of The New State. The current State Theater building. The Palms, circa 1987. Photo of the original State Theater.The venue will include sober music performances, a professional sound engineering studio, a consignment store for local artists, and classroom and performance space focusing on the development of young musicians and artists. West Side Arts Un, Limited, a newly-formed non-profit organization that includes developers, architects and business owners residing in the Near West Side, have launched a public financing campaign to raise $250,000 for the project.That money will be used to stabilize the building and winterize it, said Allyson Nemec of Quorum Architects. Another $2.5 million will then have to be raised to complete the renovations.The group hopes to open the doors of The New State in 2020.The building is currently owned by the Milwaukee Redevelopment Authority.Board members include Nemec, John Hennessy of Hennessy Group, Charles Forsberg of Mammyth Audio and Andrew Parker of Manderley Bed & Breakfast.The building was known as the State Theater from 1915 to 1955 and eventually became a well-known music club. The venue was at times also called The Palms and Electric Ballroom.Well-known musicians including U2, Elvis Costello, The Police, and Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers all played at the club.It was later renamed Hoops and became a strip club, that eventually closed in the early 1990s. The building stood empty and neglected since.In February 2017, a two-alarm fire destroyed much of the inside.Nemec, who also lives in the neighborhood, put together a group to come up with potential renovation and reuse ideas for the property.In studying the project’s feasibility, creating space that would focus on music and provide a benefit to the community became the answer.“We read a little bit about the demolition that was being contemplated by the city because no use had come forward, and wanted to do something,” Nemec said, adding that the space will also house Milwaukee businesses FREESPACE and Mammyth Audio.  “We talked about it for a long time and decided that combining forces we could all come up with something that supported an all-ages venue at this location.”  Get our email updatesBizTimes DailyManufacturing WeeklyNonprofit WeeklyReal Estate WeeklySaturday Top 10Wisconsin Morning Headlines Subscribelast_img read more

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A home for sale in Milwaukees Washington Heights

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first_imgA home for sale in Milwaukee’s Washington Heights neighborhood.Last updated on July 2nd, 2019 at 09:11 amThe Milwaukee-area housing market is showing signs that it is cooling off, according to the Greater Milwaukee Association of Realtors.A home for sale in Milwaukee’s Washington Heights neighborhood.Move-in ready homes priced below $300,000 and located in strong school districts are still selling quickly, but not as fervently as earlier in the year, said Mike Ruzicka, with GMAR.Home sales in metropolitan Milwaukee were down 6 percent in the Milwaukee-area in September, according to GMAR. “While the building blocks of the local economy and housing market are solid, there are some anecdotal reports of a cooling off in the market,” Ruzicka said. “Additionally, the number of communities defined as ‘hot markets’ (those with an increase in units sold, increased average sales price, and lower days on market) declined through the third quarter this year compared to the same period in 2017.In 2017, there were 21 hot markets through the third quarter, this year there were only 13, according to GMAR. Most of the decline was due to a decrease in unit sales, possibly because of a lack of supply in the sub-$300,000 market.Still, the third quarter of 2018 are still strong compared to the last decade. So far, 16,425 homes have been sold this year, down slightly, 0.2 percent, from last year. The totals through the third quarter for both 2017 and 2018 were the strongest this century. The next closest year was before the recession, in 2005, when 15,953 units sold, according to GMAR.While new construction has improved since the recession, it is still lackluster, Ruzicka said.“Foreclosures, which supplied thousands of homes after the recession began, have evaporated, and people are not moving out of their existing homes for a variety of reasons,” Ruzicka said.In order to have enough homes to meet current demand the market would need to add 3,500 units to the current supply, which is a 50 percent increase over the 6,897 current listings in the market, Ruzicka said.Read more economic data reports at the BizTracker page. Get our email updatesBizTimes DailyManufacturing WeeklyNonprofit WeeklyReal Estate WeeklySaturday Top 10Wisconsin Morning Headlines Subscribelast_img read more

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JC PenneyJC PenneyPlano Texasbased JC Penn

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first_imgJ.C. PenneyJ.C. PenneyPlano, Texas-based J.C. Penney Company Inc. has joined the growing list of retailers shutting down stores across the country.As part of an earnings report released on Thursday, the company announced it will close 18 full-prices stores and nine subsidiary home and furniture stores during the second quarter of this year.A list of affected locations has not been publicly released, but spokesperson Sarah Holland said in an email that the company will not close any Wisconsin stores. The retailer operates seven stores throughout the state, including three Milwaukee-area locations at Southridge Mall in Greendale, Brookfield Square in Brookfield and Crossroads Shopping Center in Menomonee Falls. Stores selected for closure “require significant capital, are minimally cash flow positive today relative to the company’s overall consolidated average or represent a real estate monetization opportunity,” according to the release. Employees at those stores will receive separation benefits.J.C. Penney reported a 7.1 percent decrease in total net sales for fiscal year 2018 in comparison to fiscal year 2017, but the company expects fiscal year 2019 to bring positive cash flow, according to the release.Other struggling retail chains that have announced or executed local and national store closures in recent months include Payless ShoeSource, Shopko and Charlotte Russe. Get our email updatesBizTimes DailyManufacturing WeeklyNonprofit WeeklyReal Estate WeeklySaturday Top 10Wisconsin Morning Headlines Subscribelast_img read more

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1 of 6

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first_img 1 of 6 Last Wednesday, January 24th, Boston Community Collaborative’s drama students at the Josiah Quincy School afterschool program performed “Lost, The Origins of the Lost Children of Neverland”. BCC students perform “Lost: The Origins of the Lost Children of Neverland” This original play was created and written by the students of the class, with guidance from BCC’s lead drama instructor, Ingrid Oslund.The Plot: Every night before bed, Wendy Darling tells her sisters the story of Peter Pan and his adventures in Neverland. However, they have gotten bored and she decides to make up new tales about the Lost Kids who joined Peter Pan’s motley crew. Little do they know, Peter and his fairy friend, Tinkerbell are watching and are not very happy with this change of routine.*Advertisement* The first story takes place in the bustling city of Havana, where a young orphan named Lily is forced to work in a factory day and night. She longs to escape this works, when a mysterious stranger comes along and asks her to think of a happy thought. She is skeptical at first, but when she does, she is able to fly to Neverland, where she joins the ranks of the Lost Children.The second story follow Toodles, a boy working on his Uncle’s farm when suddenly a tornado rips through the country side. Peter Pan offers to save him. After being sprinkled with pixie dust, he shoots into the air revealing that even in times of trouble, he can always think of a happy thought.The play ends with a movement piece depicting the journey of these children and embracing the sense of imagination that Neverland inspires in all of us.Director’s Note: The Story of Peter Pan is a timeless tale of the adventurous nature of childhood. A time that is new and exciting to all, with a sense of imagination at every turn. Childhood is also a time of great stress, where experiences seem too large to comprehend and every moment feels like the most important moment of your life.  Neverland and the character of Peter Pan represent an escape, a safe place where all can be solved with faith, trust and pixie dust. This mirrors the magic that theatre brings to me, and anyone who has had the pleasure of being touched by it. It is a place that allows you to become someone entirely different from yourself, to gain empathy for those who you have never met and to give you power in the face of an audience. I set out this session with the hope of giving these students ownership over this narrative, to make it their own. They have exceeded my expectations and I hope they know they have created a little magic of their own on this stage.A lovely, festive reception followed the show.BCC was incorporated in 2013 and strives to create community by connecting people and resources.BCC offers courses in Drama, Dance, Fitness and Engineering for Kids during the St John School afterschool program, courses in Drama in the North End, and at the Josiah Quincy afterschool program. BCC holds a Movers and Shakers class for babies and toddlers at the West End Community Center. BCC hosts a number of community events: Movie Nights in the Gassy during the summer, an annual Halloween Party for adults, and an annual Springtime Egg Hunt in Christopher Columbus Park. For more information, contact becca0923@yahoo.com.Upcoming Events:February 9 and 10, Auditions for “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”, our Spring 2018 Mainstage show. This will be a collaboration between professional actors and our students.March 3, 2 pm – Opportunity to see “The Addams Family Musical” a musical choreographed by drama and dance instructor Ingrid Oslund at Brimmer and May School in Brookline.March 18, 2 pm – End of Winter session production – Mini Musicals.  All of our North End drama and dance students will come together to perform in this production.Spring, 2018, annual neighborhood egghunt.June 1 and 2, 7 pm, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” – Our Mainstage Production which puts Shakespeare’s classic comedy in the swamps of Athens, Georgia.Mid June, End of Spring session productionlast_img read more

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Tobin Bridge Repair Project to Bring FullTime Lan

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first_imgTobin Bridge Repair Project to Bring Full-Time Lane Closures Starting April 22A three-year restoration project of the Tobin Bridge is scheduled to begin later this month consisting of repairs to both the upper and lower decks, repaving of ramps, and the creation of a new parking lot. Read more about upcoming closures and detours here.North End Roof GardensPhilip Bellone, who grew up in Boston’s North End in the 1950s and 60s, reflects on the hundreds of potted plants and herbs that grew in rooftop gardens during his childhood. Read the full story and add your own comments about the neighborhood rooftops, past and present, here.Initial Questions About North Washington Street Bridge Project Answered at Neighborhood Council MeetingJeff Dietrich led a community chat at the April North End / Waterfront Neighborhood Council (NEWNC) meeting to answer questions about the North Washington Street Bridge project and share an overview of the current project plans. Read more and watch the meeting video here.Editor’s ChoiceNorth End Library Memorial Brick RelocationThe Memorial Bricks at the North End Library have been moved to a more prominent and secure space in front of the Dante Frieze, where they can be easily seen without being worn down by foot traffic. Read more and see photos of the relocation project here.While you’re here …we have a small favor to ask. More people than ever are reading NorthEndWaterfront.com but we need your help making ends meet. Advertising doesn’t bring in enough to pay for reporting or editorial work. Keeping this website going takes a lot of time, money and hard work. But we do it because we believe community news is important – and we think you do too. If everyone who reads this site, who likes it, puts in a bit to pay for it, then our future would be much more secure. Checks can be made out to North End Boston LLC, 343 Commercial St. #508, Boston 02109 or contribute online using the following links:*Make a One-Time Contribution* or *Become a Patron* This week’s top posts on NorthEndWaterfront.com featured development projects, bridge repairs, neighborhood events and more! Read on below to see the most popular articles from this past week.Dock Square Garage Plan Shows Limits of Building Over Existing Parking StructureThe limits of building on top of an existing parking garage became apparent at last week’s public meeting. In addition to height and shadow concerns, meeting attendees criticized the parking-centric plan which is coming at the expense of activating the ground levels around the large structure. Read more and see renderings here.3rd Annual North End Cornhole Classic May 20State Representative Aaron Michlewitz is hosting the third Annual North End Cornhole Classic, a tournament with proceeds going to the Geraldine Marshall Scholarship Fund and the North End Music and Performing Arts Center (NEMPAC Boston) on Sunday, May 20 at The Living Room. Read more about how you can participate here.*Advertisement*last_img read more

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