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Housing Learning Event Scheduled For Thursday March 7

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first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by South Sound Habitat For HumanityOlympia, WA — The Thurston County Asset Building Coalition will present Housing First: A Shared Learning Event, on the topic of rapid re-housing on Thursday, March 7, from 10 AM to 12 PM, at the First United Methodist Church of Olympia (1224 Legion Way SE). The event is open to all local service providers, policy makers, advocates, and other community members with an interest in issues of housing and homelessness.The event will feature presentations by Curt Andino, Executive Director of South Puget Sound Habitat for Humanity, and Phil Owen, Program Director of Sidewalk, and will include a moderated discussion of best practices in the field of rapid re-housing.Rapid re-housing is a set of strategies designed to help families move out of homelessness and into permanent housing as quickly as possible. The strategies often include help with housing searches and landlord mediation, short-term and flexible rental assistance, and transitional case management.The Thurston County Asset Building Coalition is comprised of leadership from human and social services, financial institutions, micro-enterprise, workforce development, and  economic and community development agencies. The Coalition has forged partnerships to assist in building individual’s assets and improving quality of life throughout our community. Members of the Thurston County Asset Building Coalition work together to assist people with low incomes to have the tools they need to become prosperous. The Asset Building Coalition coordinates service providers to identify and fill gaps and strengthen our ability to help people in our community to gain access to services they need.For more information about this event, please contact the event coordinator at addie@spshabitat.org, or 360-956-3456 ext. 4.last_img read more

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Phoenix Rising School’s Friday Workshops Bring Real World Skills, and Joy,…

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first_imgFacebook23Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Phoenix Rising School“It is a problem that so many children love learning and hate school,” says Nick Gillon, The Phoenix Rising School’s Education Director. “It’s a problem when rich, rigorous, relevant and engaging experiences have become the exception rather than the norm.” At heart, he says, the issue is one of equating ‘learning’ with ‘schooling’, and academic schooling at that.But learning encompasses many other skills which are applicable in everyday life, which is why every Friday, Phoenix students from kindergarten through 6th grade get the chance to participate in workshops that run the gamut from crochet to canning, bmx bikes to propulsion science, and acrogym to candle making. The result is enthusiasm, new skills, pride in their work and – dare we say it? – joy.“I don’t know many schools that make homemade spaghetti, bike ride, weave, do pickling and lots of other things,” says Pyrenees, age ten. “This way kids can learn about things that they love,” explains Chatalain, also age ten. “Sometimes if you just get assigned something, you don’t want to be there. When you can choose it, you can easily feel like, ‘I love this because I chose it and I knew what I wanted to do.’”Students find that the skills they pick up in workshops transfer nicely to the rest of their lives. “If you didn’t know how to ride a bike and you took the biking workshop, you would know how to do that skill,” says Helen, a third grader. “And cooking, that’s something we can use every day.”For teachers, workshops offer a chance to teach a subject they’re passionate about. “I get to choose something that I’m really interested in, so it’s not like actually working because I have so much fun,” says 3rd and 4th grade teacher Megan Moskwa, who has taught canning, soap making, candle making and more.“Seeing kids get excited about making blackberry jam really makes my day,” Audrey Goodwin-Arpin concurs. Four days a week she teaches K-1, but on Fridays she has offered acrogym, crochet, jewelry making, knitting and most recently, cooking. “If I like something and I do it in my own life, I transfer that passion to them,” she says.Students and teachers also get an opportunity to mix with people they wouldn’t normally see. According to Miles, a first grader, “You can get to know other people better.” The different grouping of students add to the feeling of a village, says Audrey. “When I see the students outside at recess, I’ve already been their teacher. There’s a different level of respect and a feeling that we’re responsible for all of them, not just the ones in our class. It’s also a way to keep track of the ones that I’ve already had that have moved on from my class.”Here are some of the workshops that have been taught at Phoenix Rising over the last three years:bmx bikesartfairy housescandle makingsoccercookingsurvival skillsacrogymadvanced electronicssoap makingweavingKorean languagepuppetspianotheaterpotterycartoonjournalismjewelry makingimprovsinginglamp makingcreative dramagardeningfiber artsliving historydanceschool beautifulrace carswater colorcarpentryhandbuilt potteryanimepropulsion scienceoutdoor educationdigital photo and videolast_img read more

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Jazz and Blues Vocalist Dennis Hastings Featured at Saint Martin’s Music…

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first_imgFacebook2Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Saint Martin’s UniversityJazz and blues vocalist Dennis Hastings, who has played on the same bill with notable talent such as Bobby McFerrin, John Lee Hooker and The Marcels, will bring his repertoire of tunes made popular from the 1940s to the 2000s during the next Music @ 11 recital at Saint Martin’s University. The musical series is free and open to the public and the concert will take place Tuesday, November 18, at 11 a.m. in Kreielsheimer Hall, the theatre arts building, on the Saint Martin’s University campus, 5000 Abbey Way SE.“I am pleased to be able to bring Dennis Hastings on campus to perform this diverse genre of music,” says Darrell Born, director of music, associate professor of music and chair of the Department of Fine Arts. “Jazz is such an important part of our American culture. I am thrilled to bring such a quality and varied example of vocal jazz to our campus community and students.”Originally from Portland, Oregon, Hastings has been singing jazz and blues in the Northwest for more than 30 years. His focus has recently been on producing a CD that will include musicians who are living and performing in the Pacific Northwest. Hastings has also been involved with performing the arrangements of the late Mel Tormé. His range of music includes many of Frank Sinatra’s hits, as well as songs by Sting and Stevie Wonder. A wide selection of classic blues is also a mainstay of his sets whenever he performs.During his Music @ 11 performance, Hastings will be accompanied by Phil Lawson on guitar, Steven Luceno on bass and Steven Bentley on drums.Hastings lives with his wife, Beverly, in Olympia and can be seen in venues from Seattle to the Portland area.Born created the “Music @ 11” recital series, now in its 10th year, to raise awareness of the musical arts and provide opportunities for students and the community to experience various kinds of music in a recital setting.last_img read more

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Adopt-A-Pet Dog of the Week

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first_imgFacebook9Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Adopt-A-PetPongo is a fun loving 2-year-old boy who loves car rides, walks nicely on leash, and knows some basic commands.  He is very eager to learn more from his new family. Pongo already loves to carry the ball; now he’s ready to learn how to play fetch so he can bring the ball back to you when you throw it. He goes into his crate when asked and comes with his very own Lazy Boy recliner chair.Pongo is a sweet 2-year-old dog looking for a forever family. Photo courtesy: Adopt-A-PetPongo is a smart and sweet boy who is like a sponge, ready to soak up anything you want to teach him. He has been neutered, up-to-date on his vaccinations, and waiting for you to come and meet him.Adopt-A-Pet has many great dogs and always need volunteers. To see all our current dogs, visit the Adopt-A-Pet website, our Facebook page or at the shelter on Jensen Road in Shelton. For more information, email thedoghouse3091@hotmail.com or call 360-432-3091.last_img read more

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MS Dhoni books his spot in Gavaskar’s top choices for T20 World Cup next…

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first_imgAdvertisement The veteran wicketkeeper MS Dhoni has been named in Sunil Gavaskar’s preferred choice XI as the primary keeper of the T20 World Cup next year in Australia. The Indian legendary Sunil Gavaskar previously mentioned that the Indian team management should look beyond MS Dhoni, further adding that time has come to “look beyond Mahendra Singh Dhoni” and invest in youth for the upcoming tournaments. With, Rishabh Pant not been able to grab his opportunities, MS remains as a “top-choice” going into the international stage next year according to the legend.Advertisement When questioned whether Dhoni should be chosen for the upcoming Bangladesh series, Gavaskar strongly declined to that.Advertisement “No, we need to look beyond. Mahendra Singh Dhoni at least doesn’t figure in my team. If you are talking about the T20 World Cup, I will certainly think about Rishabh Pant,” Gavaskar said in an interview.And as for the youngster Pant, Gavaskar reckons, Sanju should be considered ahead of Rishabh Pant.Advertisement “If I need to have an alternate option, then I will think of Sanju Samson because Sanju is a good ‘keeper as well as a good batsman.”“If I have to think of the T20 World Cup, I would think about youth as we need to look forward. Dhoni has made great contribution to Indian cricket but it’s now time to look beyond him,” the iconic batsman stated earlier.On another interview on the ‘India Today’ channel, Gavaskar was spotted saying: “I think he (Dhoni) should be going without being pushed out.”MS Dhoni, is yet to announce his international retirement and the current selection committee has indicated that the matter shouldn’t be looked behind.  Advertisementlast_img read more

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Sony Pictures Sports Network launches ‘The Blue Revolution’ that revisits the Indian cricket team’s…

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first_imgAdvertisement mqNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs9trWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E4tc( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 7q5riWould you ever consider trying this?😱4rjhCan your students do this? 🌚5eiRoller skating! Powered by Firework Sony Pictures Sports Network (SPSN) aims to galvanize the passion that millions of Indians have for cricket by showcasing the best moments from the historical tournament that had the Indian cricket team donning the blue jersey, in the series, ‘The Blue Revolution’. The 12-part series revisits India’s landmark victory in the 1985 B&H World Championship of Cricket which was the first major tournament India won in colored clothing and established its dominance in cricket across the globe.Advertisement SPSN deep dives into the historical archives to revisit the victorious campaign of the 1985 B&H World Championship of Cricket in ‘The Blue Revolution’ and will showcase how India marked its dominance in cricket, ultimately giving rise to the term ‘Men in Blue. Cricket fans will relive the action-packed iconic performances from the 1985 Indian team as they paved their way towards reaffirming their status as world champions after a string of disappointing results since the 1983 World Cup win in England.Advertisement The series launches on 4th May 2020 and will be aired exclusively on SONY SIX and SONY SIX HD channels from 8:30 PM.As a part of the build-up to the marquee episodes and matches, SPSN has organized a series of live interactive chat sessions with some of the Indian cricket legends and heroes of the unbeaten class of ’85 – Ravi Shastri, Roger Binny, Madan Lal and Laxman Sivaramakrishnan. The sessions will be hosted by Rajdeep Sardesai and Joy Bhattacharya, and sports enthusiasts can watch them in conversation LIVE at @SonySportsIndia, the official Facebook page of Sony Pictures Sports Network.Advertisement The World Championship of Cricket was a ‘mini’ World Cup played between seven teams: India, Australia, England, Pakistan, New Zealand, Sri Lanka and West Indies. Before touching down in Australia in 1985, the Indian team had lost three series on the bounce and were one of the least favorites to win the tournament, even after the heroic 1983 World Cup finals win over West Indies. Led by the astute Sunil Gavaskar, the Indian team donned the Blue Jersey for the first time and went on to beat all teams in the series and eventually winning the finals against archrivals Pakistan. Since then, only one color has been associated with the Indian cricket team and this built the foundation for the ‘The Blue Revolution’.Watch the BLUE REVOLUTION starting from 4th May 2020 at 8:30 PM exclusively on SONY SIX and SONY SIX HD channels  Advertisementlast_img read more

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Monmouth Arts Continues to Paint a Colorful Picture

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first_imgTeresa Staub, the new executive director of Monmouth Arts, helps spread the news of the group’s work in the arts.By Mary Ann Bourbeau |RED BANK – Monmouth Arts, the county’s official arts agency, is dedicated to promoting a vibrant arts community that enhances the quality of life for all of its residents.Teresa Staub took over in February as executive director and she’s looking forward to getting the word out about the organization to both artists and residents alike. Staub worked as a fundraiser for the American Cancer Society for 11 years. Her daughter became involved with Phoenix Productions in Red Bank, and instead of waiting for her in the car, Staub started helping the theater group with props. Before she knew it, she was producing a show.“Once I got involved, I absolutely loved it,” she said.She was a fundraiser for New Jersey Repertory Company in Long Branch, the Algonquin Arts Theatre in Manasquan and the Axelrod Performing Arts Center in Deal before coming to Monmouth Arts.“I am so proud to be a part of a nonprofit that allows our arts community to flourish,” she said. “Through its many programs and services, Monmouth Arts sparks cultural growth as well as provides much-needed funds to arts organizations to create a thriving cultural environment.”Monmouth Arts’ programs are made possible through funding from the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders, the Monmouth County Historical Commission and the New Jersey State Council on the Arts/ Department of State, a partner agency of the National Endowment of the Arts. With an annual budget of $500,000 and a five-person staff, the organization supports artists and arts groups through a multitude of efforts such as networking events, workshops, art walks, grants and other resources. Some of the professional development opportunities include workshops on strategic planning, using social media and developing an artist statement. The organization also publicizes artist performances and exhibitions in e-blasts, through social media and on the website.Monmouth Arts was founded in 1971 after the Junior League of Monmouth County saw the need for a central agency to coordinate and assist all county artists and arts organizations. It began with seed money from the Junior League and the New Jersey State Council on the Arts. In 1973, an anonymous donor provided funds to purchase Walter Reade’s Carlton Theatre in Red Bank, later renamed the Count Basie Theatre in honor of Red Bank native William James “Count” Basie. Although they are both still located at the same Monmouth Street address, the two non- profits separated in 1999 so that each could better focus on its individual mission. “People should stop by to find out all we do,” said Staub.The Monmouth Arts community is made up of 75 nonprofit arts groups, 1,400 artists and 3,080 creative businesses such as art galleries, theater groups, bookstores, music and arts academies, dance schools, design, advertising, architecture and publishing businesses. It also has many individual arts supporters.“I always look at Monmouth Arts as the group behind the curtain,” said Staub.The Monmouth Teen Arts Festival, which takes place every March at Brookdale Community College, is one of its biggest events, attracting 2,000 middle and high school students each year. Sneak Peek Film and Reception events are held in conjunction with Bow Tie Cinemas, Sony Pictures Classics and area restaurants. The next one will take place on June 15 at Front Street Trattoria, followed by a screening of “Maudie” at Bow Tie Cinemas.The 2017 Monmouth County Senior Art Show will run from Aug. 4-30 at the Monmouth County Library headquarters in Manalapan, with a special reception on Aug. 16. First place winners in both professional and non-professional levels across 11 categories will advance to the state competition.“I think people would be surprised to see all we offer the community,” said Staub. For more information, visit www.monmoutharts.org.Arts and entertainment writer Mary Ann Bourbeau can be reached at mbourbeau@tworivertimes.com.This article was first published in the June 1-June 8, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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Public Invited To Weigh In On Managing Flood Risk

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first_imgResidents of Monmouth County will get to weigh in later this month on a federal government study looking at ways to “manage” flood risk in New Jersey and New York, two states that experienced significant damage during Super Storm Sandy more than six years ago. “No decision has been made about what features or measures could be recommended,” Embrich said. “All or none of the proposed measures could be considered environmentally acceptable, or economically feasible.” Part of the process is to hear from the public. Meetings have been scheduled in both states, in March and April, to give the community a chance to weigh in. The federal government would contribute 65 percent of the cost of any project, with the rest picked up by a “non-federal sponsor,” he said. Overall, that project would take 25 years to build and cost around $119 billion. By Philip Sean Curran In February, the Army Corps of Engineers released a 136-page interim report for its New York-New Jersey Harbor and Tributaries Coastal Storm Risk Management Feasibility Study. An option being considered is “a combination levee, berm and surge gate/barrier system” from Sandy Hook to Breezy Point, in Queens, New York, along with having a “similar surge barrier enclosure along the East River … ,” the report said in part. Another element would be to put surge gates and other measures in New York’s Pelham Bay. “We are still very early in the process of this study, which is not expected to conclude until 2022,” said Michael T. Embrich, a spokesman for the Army Corps of Engineers, in an email. “Ultimately, after an internal governmental process, Congress makes the final decision on any project the Corps would build.” “Devastation in the wake of Hurricane Sandy revealed a need to address the vulnerability of populations, infrastructure and resources at risk throughout the North Atlantic coastal region,” the report read in part. The first meeting in New Jersey is scheduled to start at 5 p.m. March 27 in the Middletown Arts Center, 36 Church St. A presentation by the study team will be held from 5:30 to 6 p.m. Audience question and answer session will be from 6 to 7 p.m. Monmouth County Freeholder Gerry P. Scharfenberger said natural dunes “were the most effective in keeping the floodwaters out of north Middletown.” “I would hope that would be a consideration, where we’d use sort of natural barriers like that as a means of flood control and flood prevention,” he said. This year will mark the seventh anniversary of Sandy, what the Army Corps of Engineers called “the largest storm of its kind to hit the U.S. East Coast.”last_img read more

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Fair Haven in No Rush to Crush Brush Processing

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first_imgSpitz called the processing center a “missed opportunity,” and a prime location for a dog park, or a community garden. “It is not an appropriate location any longer,” Spitz said. “The neighborhood has changed. It’s not fair to our lives. It’s not fair to our health.” “I don’t see any way to relocate the facility in the borough, so the only other choice would be to close it down,” Mayor Ben Lucarelli said. “Then we’re left with handling the disposable brush in a proper and environmentally conscious way.” Since it’s been a mutually beneficial partnership for both parties, Spitz wondered if the borough could pursue a similar interlocal agreement to take brush processing outside the municipal border. Lucarelli said closing the facility would probably mean adding two more employees to the Department of Public Works and purchasing a $400,000 rear loader vehicle, like a garbage truck. Additional transportation costs would also come into play. To avoid transport during peak school hours, early morning drop-off and afternoon pickup, the grinding can begin as early as 7 a.m. Fair Haven Police Chief Joseph McGovern told residents Monday the operation’s early start time is protected by ordinance. “You’re talking about adding millions of dollars to the budget in order to accomplish this,” Lucarelli said. In an interview, borough administrator Teresa Casagrande said the location of the site – between William Street and several baseball fields, basketball courts and a soccer pitch at Fair Haven Fields – is a pre-existing condition of the neighborhood that dates back to the 1950s. In return, maintenance of Fair Haven parks and municipal grounds, as well as street-sweeping and storm-water catch-basin cleaning falls under the purview of Rumson. Fair Haven and Rumson entered into a shared service agreement in April 2012, trading key maintenance services to collectively cut costs. Lucarelli said it’s something he has explored, but the borough’s Fair Haven Fields Natural Area Advisory Committee quickly squashed. Under the terms, Fair Haven handles the collection and processing of both boroughs’ brush, as well as offering engineering services from in-house professionals for small jobs. FAIR HAVEN – JenniferSpitz said the decorativemolding is rattling off thewalls of her home and anearby brush processingoperation is to blame. Resident Bob Donnelly questioned whether the site could be relocated deeper within the 73-acre Fair Haven Fields tract, possibly in the natural area. Spitz resides on William Street, in a neighborhood that backs up to a wooded area of Fair Haven Fields. At Monday’s borough council meeting she played a 45-second video filmed from the deck in her backyard. Sptiz said twice a year, for days and sometimes two to three weeks at a time, her home shakes, the backyard is unusable and her kids are unable to ride their bikes to school because of the operation. “We’ve worked to makethis as efficient a processas we can. We’ve gottenthe collection down to sixmonths out of the year,when it used to be nine.And now we only processtwice a year and try to havethe operation completed inless than a week, weatherpending,” Casagrande said,noting the job is completedbefore Fair Haven Day andin the late fall. The process includes 18-wheeler trucks transporting brush collected from Fair Haven and Rumson to the facility before it’s loaded into an industrial grinder. “They are quite defensive of that area and want to keep it natural. So I don’t see Fair Haven Fields as a viable option. Hypothetically, if we got approval of that committee, then we’d have to get approval from the county, followed by the state. And from what I understand that’s exceedingly difficult,” Lucarelli said. Casagrande told residents a cooperative county facility for peninsula towns at Fort Monmouth was another option investigated by the mayor, but “Fort Monmouth turned it down.” “I can’t accept ‘no’ any longer,” Sptiz said in a post-meeting interview. “I’m asking (the council) to represent us and find a better way to do this, whether that’s a partnership with another town or with the county. I’d like their help in figuring that out. I know they’re volunteers, which is why I’m willing to volunteer and do the legwork. I just need some direction. I’m pleading with them to help.” It wasn’t the woodland setting that was the focal point, but rather the video’s soundtrack, a constant chorus of industrial buzzing and grinding coming from beyond the trees at the borough’s designated processing site. The next Fair HavenFields Advisory CommitteeMeeting is scheduled forJuly 17.last_img read more

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Saints continue to build for next season, ink Arie Postmus of the Hawks

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first_imgThe Selkirk College Saints Men’s Hockey program has dug into the Beaver Valley Nitehawks program to score defenceman Fruitvale native Arie Postmus to the Saints beginning in the 2013/14 B.C. Intercollegiate Hockey League season. Postmus joins the Saints following three seasons with the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League’s Beaver Valley Nitehawks.He finished second on the Nitehawks in scoring by defencemen last season with 23 points in 50 games and added another six points in 13 playoff contests. Overall, Postmus suited up in 183 games for Beaver Valley, scoring 18 times while picking up 70 assists and 233 penalty minutes. The 21-year old also helped the Nitehawks to a KIJHL championship during the 2011/12 season. “Arie is a mobile, puck-moving defenceman who will fit in nicely with the style of game that we play,” says Saints head coach Jeff Dubois. “He’s been a key piece of a top-end program in the KIJHL and gone through the experience of being a leader and contributor to a championship team, which is important to us. I look forward to Arie developing into a productive and important player at the college level.” Postmus plans to enroll in Selkirk’s Business Administration program. “I’m excited to be able to play close to home and be a part of the team’s new winning tradition,” saidPostmus, who describes himself as a solid all-around defensemen who takes care of his defensive zone first and can play in all situations.”I’m going to focus on getting really good grades and working hard every day to help the team capture another championship.” Postmus is the third defenceman and seventh player overall to commit to the Saints for the 2013/14 season. He joins forwards Darnell Dyck (Langley, BCHL) and Garrett Kucher (Osoyoos, KIJHL), defencemen Stefan Gonzales (Aldergrove, PJHL) and Ryan Procyshyn (Delta, PJHL) and goaltenders Myles Hovdebo (LaRonge, SJHL) and Marcus Beesley (Nelson, KIJHL).last_img read more

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